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Articles by this author:

  • Though clichés might suggest that neighbors are usually more at war than at peace, in a reversal of the Hatfield and McCoy paradigm, two neighbors in Montauk have joined forces to combine their properties and sell them as one
  •     The house is purple. Inside and out: painted cedar planks on the exterior and tongue-in-groove millwork in the interior. The overarching aesthetic is startling given the setting in tall white-pine woods in East Hampton’s Northwest — a setting that prompted the modernist architect Don Chappell to suggest vibrant color for dramatic contrast. At least that’s how it all used to be. Today, if you take a careful look you will find a recent addition that has a calming effect.

  • A loan shark used to be the go-to guy when you needed quick, easy money and were willing to pay through the nose in interest. These days “hard money loans” don’t carry such a stigma: The term “private equity consultant” sounds better than “loan shark.”
  • The South Fork is the ideal place to build your dream house, right? Well, yes, but there are restrictions up the kazoo about how to go about it
  • Though historic houses are a huge factor in what creates the aura of the Hamptons, buyers are few and far between.
  • Take a look at real estate ads and you will notice that the names of certain brokers keep cropping up on the ultra high-priced listings
  • Did you know that in the Town of East Hampton you are only permitted to rent your house out for fewer than 14 days twice in a six-month period? Otherwise it is considered a motel.
  • Houses on the low end of the market can be found but usually need a lot of work.
  • Even in the Hamptons, a price tag of $75 million for a 5-plus-acre property raises eyebrows.

Blogs by this author:

  • We've heard that sauvignon blanc pairs well with fish, but how about chardonnay mixed with prehistoric shark tooth jewelry?

    Lieb Cellars East Hampton, the wine tasting room on Park Place in the Reutershan parking lot, is featuring different local vendors on July weekends. The pop-up for July 4th weekend was Fin Jewelry, fine jewelry made of shark teeth and gold by Bella Ornaf, a Montauk shark wrangler, and Whalebone Creative, purveyors of handmade goods inspired by the original Montauk culture.

  • It made sense when Vineyard Vines, a shop known for preppy apparel, opened in Southampton, land of the Bathing Corp., Meadow Club, and assorted world class golf courses.  Having just opened a pop-up store on Main Street in East Hampton Village, the jury is still out on how well it will do in the burgh that is home more to Hollywood types and artists than socialites.

  • For visitors without cars, residents who want to help alleviate traffic, or those who want an affordable solution to drinking and getting around, the Hamptons Hopper has hit the road.

    Last week marked the maiden journey of the "retro chic" shuttle bus that bills itself as a mode of both “transportation and socialization.” The service, with a fleet of sea-green converted school buses, utilizes a mobile app for iPhone (and soon Android) to let riders see where the stops are and when to expect its arrival.

  • Another installment in our sampling of East Hampton shop prices this summer. Prices speak for themselves.

  • First West Elm, an edgy furnishings chain, opened this spring in Water Mill. Then ground was broken on land in Wainscott for a Home Goods branch, the discount home décor adjunct of T.J. Maxx.

  • Regina Kravitz, a veteran fashion designer, has partnered with Stitch, a Southampton boutique and tailor shop where her contemporary Hamptons line called ReginaKravitz for Stitch will be available.

  • We may pretend we don’t care, but, c’mon, don’t you want to know which Southampton house the Kardashian sisters rented this summer?

    Khloe, Kourtney, and presumably Kim, fresh from her betrothal to Kanye West, rented a storefront off Job’s Lane in Southampton and will be filming their reality TV series “Kourtney and Khloe Take the Hamptons,” this summer, based on their adventures. Now, since they will need somewhere to sleep after all their cavorting around town, they have leased digs in North Sea.

  • Each summer dozens of fitness studios come . . . and go at season’s end. That’s one reason to take notice of Elements Fitness Studio. Opened in July by Andrea Fornarola Hunsberger, a dancer, the bright space on East Hampton’s Newtown Lane with mirrored walls and ballet barres is here to stay year round. The other reason is its focused selection of challenging workouts.

  • Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, an East Hampton emporium dedicated to selling both rare publications and art, has partnered this summer with Grey Area, an art and design consultancy. With Kyle DeWoody at the helm, Grey Area defines its mission thus: "With art as a starting point, Grey Area seeks to push the limits of creative engagement and expression through collaboration, installation, and programming."

  • The crew at East Hampton Gourmet Food, an 18-year-old wholesale-retail catering company and bakery off Newtown Lane, are working day and night to prepare enough gluten-free crisp bread to wow some 300 judges. Their lentil-rice crisp bread with sesame pink salt has been nominated for the food industry’s prestigious SOFI Award, an acronym that stands for specialty outstanding food innovation. The awards honor members of the Specialty Food Association who “represent culinary innovation across America and around the globe,” according to its website.