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  • The East Hampton Town Trustees have faced the tensions of going it alone instead of cooperating with a number of other government agencies for a long time. The idea, still in currency among some members and residents, has been that since the trustees were given authority by royal decree in the 17th century, no entity can take it away.
  • Okay, so this winter has not been nearly as bad as the one that preceded it, but it nevertheless has been bleak, at times freezing cold, and, except for a bit of snow, lacking in seasonal diversions. How thankful we are, though, for the half-off sales. Retail, it seems, can give us something to do when there is little left other than binge-watching Netflix.
  • East Hampton High School has a drug problem. We know this because the administration has scheduled forums at which the use of the life-saving anti-opiate known as Narcan will be explained and kits made available for parents to take home. What we do not know is how big the problem is. School officials have not been forthcoming, saying only that there has been an “uptick” in drug-related incidents. Much more needs to be said.
  • The year 2100 might seem a long way off, but for East Hampton Town and much of the rest of the world’s coastal communities, it is a date that should be of genuine concern. According to a new study released on Monday, oceans could rise by as much as four feet by the end of the century.
  • A recently unveiled plan for a car wash on Springs-Fireplace Road in East Hampton should not be considered in a vacuum. But that is, unfortunately, the sense we get from some members of the town planning board, who appeared favorably inclined toward the proposal presented to them on Feb. 3. They are, perhaps, to be forgiven because this part of town has become a place for businesses not welcome elsewhere. Whether that kind of use should be perpetuated there is an good question.
  • There are plenty of reasons why the old notion of the East End breaking away to form its own Peconic County is next-to impossible, but a new issue — how to regulate taxis and ride-sharing services — points to the necessity of some regional cooperation.
  • In the face of what seems to be increasingly outsized pressure, the East Hampton Town and Village Zoning Boards of Appeal seem to be getting tough. That’s a good thing.
  • With the Springs Fire District commissioners’ decision to supplement its volunteer ambulance squad with professional responders, a last South Fork holdout has joined the ranks of those with paid emergency providers.
  • It has usually been predictable that winter weather will arrive on the South Fork at around the end of January. This year, like last, saw a relatively benign December and first three weeks of January. Then, on Jan. 22 and 23, snow arrived in a storm that set records as nearby as La Guardia Airport.
  • It was perhaps only in passing that East Hampton Town supervisor Larry Cantwell mused last summer about a program by which troublesome nightclubs that draw the transient party crowd could be eliminated. But relatively little has been done about the nightlife issue since a massive public outcry at a July meeting in Montauk