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  •    Toby Haynes is a representational artist whose work ranges from portraits of animals to portraits of people and to seascapes and plein-air landscapes. A man who divides his time between East Hampton and Launceston, Cornwall — where he has lived since 1978 with sheep and cows grazing outside his window and, for 17 years, without electricity — it is not surprising that he is inspired by nature and by the light in both places, which are surrounded by water.

  • It was a roundabout route that would set one New Yorker down in the hamlet she came to love.
  •     Once the small group at the Amagansett Citizens Advisory Committee’s meeting on Monday evening had dispensed with minutes and reports from the committee’s zoning and planning board liaisons, summer 2012 seemed uppermost in everyone’s minds.

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        It may come as a surprise that a Dutch colonial house built in 1920 would epitomize an Italian minimalist style. But, after modest renovations, that is just how one would describe a Bridgehampton house today.
         East of the Bridgehampton School, between the Montauk Highway and fields farmed by the McCoy family, the property also has a barn and several outbuildings, including a guest house.

  •     The Pamela Williams gallery on Main Street in Amagansett will close its doors at the end of the month.
        Ms. Williams, who opened the gallery on Feb. 12, 2005, after being a director at Lizan Tops in East Hampton for 10 years, until it closed, was followed by many artists to her new space.

  • John Iversen, a jeweler and goldsmith, balks at being called an artist, but it’s impossible to look at the cuff-like bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and brooches he has made over the last 30 years and not see them as wearable sculptures. Apparently the curators of the Drawing Room agree, as they are showing his elegantly wrought jewelry and works on paper in the same gallery that has shown the artists Jennifer Bartlett, Robert Harms, and Costantino Nivola, among others.

  •    John Iversen, a jeweler and goldsmith, balks at being called an artist, but it’s impossible to look at the cuff-like bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and brooches he has made over the last 30 years and not see them as wearable sculptures. Apparently the curators of the Drawing Room agree, as they are showing his elegantly wrought jewelry and works on paper in the same gallery that has shown the artists Jennifer Bartlett, Robert Harms, and Costantino Nivola, among others.

  • Tuesday is the day when the Amagansett satellite of the East Hampton Food Pantry opens at 3 p.m. for pickups. Originally located at Scoville Hall, its temporary home now is St. Michael’s Lutheran Church, at least until the hall is repaired after a fall fire that destroyed a good part of it.

    A blood drive will be held on Monday from noon to 7:15 p.m. at the American Legion Hall, which is at the corner of Montauk Highway and Abraham’s Path. Anyone needing information can call 324-3842.

  • Hans Vandebovenkamp, who has fulfilled more than 100 commissions for his massive sculptures and had more than 50 one-man shows in different parts of the world, has executed perhaps his largest — living — sculpture to date in Sagaponack, where he and his late wife, Siv Cedering, set about transforming a former horse farm into a sculpture park, replete with chickens and golden pheasants.

  •     The Drawing Room gallery, which was opened by Emily Goldtein and Victoria Munroe in an allée off the north side of Newtown Lane in East Hampton Village in 2004, has moved to a temporary spot farther west on the same street, next to Mecox Gardens and across from Waldbaum’s.
        “We outgrew the space two or three years ago,” said Ms. Munroe recently. Between that and knowing a year ago that they would have to leave their nook, they had been looking around and feel lucky to have found the space at 66 Newtown Lane.