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Articles by this author:

  • Havens Beach in Sag Harbor has been inadvertently transformed into an active archaeological site following last November’s dredging of a section of the bay off Long Wharf. Along with the pumped sand came musket balls, an oil lamp, shards of pottery and porcelain, and coins that date as far back as 1875.
  • Members of the farming community were invited to a Sagaponack Village Board meeting on Monday to express their opinions on a proposed series of code changes to regulate deer fencing.
  • More "to go" items at Hooked and Art of Eating; Chefs and Champagne next weekend, and a talk about beer at East Hampton Library
  • $10.5 million in C.P.F. money approved for 1.25-acre park next to the bridge to North Haven.
  • Sen is back; oysters for everyone; bowling alley edibles, and a new cafe menu in Water Mill
  • A small procession of people, some wearing stickers that read “Protect the Long Pond Greenbelt,” voiced concern at a Sag Harbor Village Board public hearing on Tuesday evening about the board’s proposed use of a 24-acre site off the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike as an impound yard for vehicles seized by its Police Department.
  • As part of an effort to bring more business to East Hampton Village’s commercial district, the director of the East Hampton Chamber of Commerce had a plan for a weekly event. Officials refused to give him the go-ahead.
  • A pickup truck hit a railing on Sagg Bridge in Sagaponack on July 2, demolishing a small section of the structure.
  • A recent study of the impact of sea level rise on coastal communities in the continental United States predicted that, by the year 2045, billions of dollars of East End real estate will be at risk of severe flooding.
  • Rose Brown and Arthur Graham, who received the most votes in the June 19 election for two seats on the East Hampton Village Board, were sworn in at the board’s organizational meeting on Tuesday. Ms. Brown is a newcomer to the position, while Mr. Graham was re-elected after serving the final year of the late Elbert Edwards’s term.

Blogs by this author:

  • After spending decades looking after the beautification of East Hampton Village at large, the Ladies Village Improvement Society focused on a project even closer to home this winter, refurbishing its headquarters and thrift shops at 95 Main Street.
  • The South Fork Natural History Museum in Bridgehampton is heading out into the wild to do some species spotting. Tomorrow night at 7, Joe Giunta, a birding instructor for the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, will lead participants on an owl prowl. The evening starts off indoors with a slide show and an audio presentation of various owl calls and then ventures into the woods as Mr. Giunta attempts to call the nocturnal birds into viewing range. The museum says odds are good for spotting an eastern screech owl and possibly a great horned owl. Binoculars have been recommended.