Author Information

Articles by this author:

  •    I got the best present ever for Christmas this year. It came a little early but I already love it.
        It’s a brand new titanium knee, given to me by Dr. Eugene Krauss of the Krauss Center for Joint Replacement in Riverhead. He was the fifth orthopedic surgeon that I saw and the first to find that I had tibial plateau necrosis, a dead bone.

  •     John Jilnicki, the East Hampton Town attorney, told the members of the Montauk Citizens Advisory Committee and quite a few guests on Tuesday evening that the town is in the process of overhauling several provisions of the town code to make them specific to the hamlet, including the law on mass gathering permits and noise violations. “The legislation we have now is difficult for most people to understand,” he said. The committee, concerned about whether summonses have been issued for code violations, had been trying for some time to get Mr.

  •    Sweet ’Tauk, a brand already known for its many flavored lemonades that were sold in farmers markets and in two dozen retail shops from Montauk to Bridgehampton last summer, has leased a shop in Montauk and expanded its inventory for the holidays to include the work of local artisans.

  •     The day before a female goat was scheduled to be slaughtered for her meat, she dropped a big surprise — two babies born on Sept. 27, an unusual time for a goat to give birth, since they often deliver in the spring, rarely in the fall.
        Jeremy Vannoy of Delaware, who raises and sells livestock for their meat, had no idea she was pregnant. So, of course, he canceled the slaughtering.
        “He’s a livestock agent with a heart,” Kelley Foster said.

  •     If there is one person in Montauk to be thankful for, especially for parents of young children, it’s Maureen Rutkowski. But don’t tell her that, because she’ll only rebuff the statement and make sure everyone else involved gets kudos.
        “I’m just the face of a great group of people,” she said from her lakefront house, which is scattered with kids’ paraphernalia — balls, lacrosse sticks, jackets, and other stuff her two children, Alexandra, 13, and John, 9, collect and throw about.

  •    The story goes that when I was a little girl of about 4 or 5 I went next door to a neighbor’s house and asked if she would sell me two pieces of bread for a nickel. The woman of the house was worried that we had no food and my mother was mortified. I think I was just practicing my future yard sale skills. Although I would never insult anyone by asking them if they would take a nickel for Grandma’s old serving dish.

  •     With changing weather patterns and violent storms becoming more frequent, Montauk residents are confused and concerned about where the hamlet’s emergency shelters are located. There were no shelters open in the easternmost hamlet during either Hurricane Sandy or the northeaster that followed a week later.

  •      Carl Darenberg knows Montauk, probably better than anyone else. He is at every party, event, festival, and fishing contest that’s held. And, on the following morning, he shares photos with the rest of the world in cyberspace, including Facebook.
        There’s no doubt that by Saturday morning, Montauk Chamber of Commerce’s end-of-season party tomorrow night honoring him as Person of the Year will be posted.

  •     The threat of Hurricane Sandy kept several politicians from joining the Concerned Citizens of Montauk’s annual Meet the Candidates forum‚ held at the Montauk Firehouse on Sunday. The afternoon event had half the audience it usually gets.
        Representative Tim Bishop, a Democrat from Southampton, was busy working in Yaphank with representatives from Suffolk County, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and local officials to coordinate storm planning across Long Island. He sent a representative to explain his absence.

  •     Mr. Sea Crest is a lovable feral cat who lived for at least eight years at Sea Crest on the Ocean, a resort on Napeague. That is, until he was hurt and did everything in his power to let the people taking care of him know that he needed help. He had a scratched eye that caused cloudiness and a bad limp that developed suddenly. It is thought he may have been hit by a car.

Blogs by this author:

  • A good-sized crowd turned out to support Rob Astorino, the Westchester County executive who is running for governor on the Republican and Conservative lines, at East by Northeast restaurant in Montauk on Thursday evening.

    Mr. Astorino, a former radio producer who lives in Mount Pleasant, N.Y.,  is making a bid against Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, in November. He announced his candidacy in March, and accepted the Republican nomination in May. He is in his second term as Westchester County executive.