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Articles by this author:

  •     Since the New York and European media have outed Montauk as the “it” place to be, several new stores have opened and others are raising their visibility. One of those is Melet Mercantile. Owned by Bob Melet, it’s in a rambling warehouse on Shore Road. Although it is now entering its fourth year, not too many people knew about the shop — until now — and that’s only because Mr. Melet finally allowed an interview.

  •    Joseph A. Gaviola of Montauk has been appointed the chairman of the board of directors of Suffolk Bancorp, the parent company of Suffolk County National bank, the second largest independent bank on Long Island.
        “I am very proud to be entrusted with this position,” he said on Tuesday morning on his way to catch a flight to Chicago. A member of the board since 2004, Mr. Gaviola, who owns Gaviola’s Market in the harbor area, has risen through the ranks and was previously vice president of the board.

  •     The Concerned Citizens of Montauk has not only appointed Jeremy Samuelson as its new — and first — executive director of the 40-year-old environmental advocacy organization, but has also rented space for a walk-in office on South Elmwood Avenue, where the group hopes to establish a stronger presence in the hamlet. C.C.O.M.’s monthly meetings will now be held in the new space, whose walls will soon be hung with framed photo collages of days gone by and other artifacts.

  •     A full weekend of activities will commemorate Memorial Day in Montauk, starting on Saturday with a veteran’s fish and chips dinner at the Montauk Coast Guard Station on Star Island.
        The Montauk Memorial Committee has dedicated the weekend as one of remembrance in honor of all veterans, and has worked through the winter to make the event respectful and fitting to the occasion.

  •     If last weekend was any indication we’re going to have to set some ground rules here for the summer. The Montauk Music Festival brought a large crowd to the hamlet and it reminded me of summers past and the things that people do that I don’t like.

  •     In May, libraries celebrate National Flower Month, National Latino Book Month, National Family Wellness Month, National Backyard Games Month, and National Get Caught Reading Month, all of which are keeping Julie Anne Korpi, the Montauk Library’s new children’s librarian, very busy.
        “There are a lot of national months that people don’t know about,” Ms. Korpi said.

  •      Some Montauk residents say the dim lighting in the hamlet’s business district is unsafe, and they want the town to turn up the lights downtown.

  •     At the end of a Montauk School Board meeting on Tuesday that was attended by the school attorney, Bill Cullen, who is rarely at board meetings, a group of teachers remained in their seats after it was adjourned into an executive session. They stayed on to discuss a counterproposal that the teachers association presented to the board regarding teacher contract negotiations, which have been ongoing for more than a year. The teachers are now working under an existing contract.

  •    I often wonder when people pass away if they can still hover a few days and get a closer look at what’s happening down below on earth. Like our creator, can they see all? My mom passed away in April, and if she can see that I’m not wearing lipstick, allowing my animals on the furniture, and not always styling my hair, then I’m in big troubles, as one of my children used to say.

  •    This is the season of new Montauk restaurants, with more of them to choose from in the eastern hamlet than ever before. Several had soft openings last week and have been pretty busy ever since.
        The Coast on South Euclid Avenue, where Luigi’s used to be, had a crowd last Thursday, its first day. The bar, which in keeping with the coastal theme is called the Sandbar, was filled, the tables there and in the dining room were also filled, and a crowd of locals milled outside near the dock pilings, at slatted wood tables and chairs.

Blogs by this author:

  • A good-sized crowd turned out to support Rob Astorino, the Westchester County executive who is running for governor on the Republican and Conservative lines, at East by Northeast restaurant in Montauk on Thursday evening.

    Mr. Astorino, a former radio producer who lives in Mount Pleasant, N.Y.,  is making a bid against Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, in November. He announced his candidacy in March, and accepted the Republican nomination in May. He is in his second term as Westchester County executive.