Author Information

Articles by this author:

  • At an intimate party, money was raised for abused children and Katie Beers discussed her ordeal.
  • The East Hampton club won several blue ribbons across many categories, including floral design, horticulture, and photography.
  • Richmond Burton likes to paint big, unless he wants to paint small. He uses oil paints applied so thinly they appear matte, sometimes translucent, and a lot more like acrylic. He is a trained architect who prefers mark-making in a two-dimensional form, and he really likes color, but sometimes he does not. His work over the past two decades has shown a dance across the spectrum of rigid systems of grids and complete abandonment of that structure for more organic abstraction.

  • If there were any remaining questions as to whether the South Fork could support three art fairs, their continued return over the past few years should quell them.

    This week’s returnee is Art South­ampton, an offshoot of Nick Korniloff’s Art Miami empire, which includes that main fair, held each December during Art Basel Miami Beach week, and a variety of others he hosts, either in Miami or, now, in Silicon Valley.

  • Christina Lewis Halpern’s nonprofit offers intensive computer training and industry contacts for young men of color.
  • “Unstill Life”
    Gabrielle Selz
    W.W. Norton, $26.95


    Those looking for an absorbing beach read with substance will enjoy Gabrielle Selz’s memoir, “Unstill Life.” It is the story of Peter Selz and Thalia Cheronis Selz and their two daughters, Tanya and Gabrielle, who writes about art for The Huffington Post.

  • “Villa Diodati,” a film of a chamber opera by Bank Street Films and produced by Gabriel Nussbaum, will be previewed at the Montauk Library on Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

    The plot revolves around the fateful summer of 1816, when Mary Shelley penned “Frankenstein” while staying in Geneva at the Villa Diodati with Percy Shelley and Lord Byron. An American couple on a Swiss train find themselves thrown into the past and into the lakefront villa on a dreary summer day when Mary Shelley is creating her monster.

  • Those who wonder what Albert Pink­ham Ryder’s work might have looked like mashed up with the 20th century will enjoy “Color and Time: Paintings by Roy Newell 1956-2000” at the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center.

  • Anyone looking for crowds this weekend is sure to enjoy this week’s return of two art fairs that have succeeded in becoming a fixture in Bridgehampton in the second weekend in July.

    Once the young upstart, Art Market Hamptons will return now for a fourth year with a slightly different spelling of its name at its space at the Bridgehampton Museum on the grounds of Corwith House. ArtHamptons will return for a seventh year in the same space it occupied last year at Nova’s Ark on Millstone Road.

Blogs by this author: