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  • Land art can be challenging and, judging by Saskia Friedrich’s backyard last week, also all-encompassing. On Saturday, her “ENCOUNTER/LOVE” installation opened at the Art Barge, but the days leading up to it were full of dry runs, or wet ones.
  • This year, Guild Hall has decided to let the natural bounty of the South Fork’s private gardens and commercial farms be the star of its Garden as Art tour. The event will feature gardens that have vegetable components as well as a breakfast using local farm ingredients, a panel on edible landscapes, and special discounts at several farm stands in the area.
  • Last week, Ruth Appelhof told the board and staff she would retire as director of Guild Hall at the end of 2016, after 16 years of steering the East Hampton arts institution.
  • For those who like their iambic pentameter served alfresco while seated on lawn chairs or picnic blankets, this weekend should be a cause for celebration, with two free productions of Shakespeare plays to choose from and a new partnership that could offer more in the future.
  • I took a look at Ryan McGinness’s work at the Silas Marder Gallery, then I looked again, and then once more. No matter how familiar his world of idiosyncratic signs and symbols, there is always something new to see in their more-is-more layering.
  • The Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs will present “Elaine de Kooning Portrayed,” a show that will include portraits of the artist both by her hand and those of others beginning next Thursday.
  • Snow-capped mountains, a group of Turner paintings, and industrial shipping docks might not be the first thing one thinks of when visiting the South Fork, but the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill plans to give visitors a world tour of some unusual places in the guise of Andreas Gursky photographs beginning Sunday.
  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton has two shows of note currently on view, addressing the evolving nature of photography and mechanical reproduction. Bryan Graf balances nostalgia and critical distance in his examination of historical approaches and more abstract uses of the medium, while Ethan Greenbaum plays with familiar imagery and takes it to an abstracted realm, with vacuum-formed photographs and loose 3-D prints of common objects.
  • Sara Nightingale is an energetic free spirit who manages to be a savvy art dealer. She is not immune to trends, but finds unique angles and original ways to feature them in her Water Mill gallery. Mostly, she trusts her eyes and her ability to make her view of things appealing to an audience.
  • This year’s Hampton Designer Showhouse reflects a softening of both palettes and textures. Grasscloth is the preferred wall covering, and trend-watchers will note that decorative wall painting treatments, such as ragging and other techniques, are back as well.

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