Author Information

Articles by this author:

  •     New York City’s art week has once again come to a close, and despite its perpetual sense of coal coming to Newcastle, the fairs and attendant events still packed them in, with long lines in many cases.

  • About 100 people showed up at the Avram Theater at Southampton College on Sunday night to discuss the college's closing and what might be done to save its undergraduate programs.
    Scott Carlin, a professor of environmental studies, moderated a panel that included Representative Tim Bishop, Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman, and Elizabeth Haile and Lance Gumbs of the Shinnecock Tribe.

    Mr. Gumbs noted that it was the first time that representatives of the Shinnecocks had been invited to enter discussions of the college's future.

  •     Many otherwise plugged-in cultural cog­noscenti of the South Fork might be surprised to learn that Philippe de Montebello is this year’s recipient of the Guild Hall Academy of the Arts Lifetime Achievement Award. It is not that the former and longtime Metropolitan Museum of Art director does not deserve it, but rather that few, if any, know he actually spends time here. He would like to keep it that way.

  •     After several years writing about art critically, it is often surprising what ends up being surprising. Is it just the setting that makes a group show of East End artists so striking in a Chelsea gallery or is it the art itself?

  •     Not every artist manages to continue refreshing his work into his 70s, but Keith Sonnier, through the aid of a new studio space in Bridgehampton, has managed to do just that. The evidence is on view at Pace Gallery in Chelsea through Feb. 22.

        The artist chose his most regular medium quite early in his career. Graduating from Rutgers University with an M.F.A. in 1966, it was only two years later that he began working in the neon gas lighting that has defined his sculpture ever since.

  •     Those who saw Jack Ceglic’s work at Ille Arts this summer would have been surprised by the most recent projects in his East Hampton studio last month. Although the familiar revealing and colorful portraits of friends and neighbors were well in evidence, hanging on the walls and most available surfaces were compositions expressed in the blackest of charcoal pastel.

  •     A viewer doesn’t need to know Elizabeth Huey’s complicated relationship with psychology to sense something not quite right in the superficially sunny images on the walls at Harper’s Books in East Hampton.

  • Limited by World War II rationing, two photographers and antiques collectors made Montauk’s vistas their own.
  •     If it was anyone else, it might be considered a garage sale, a large collection of mostly unrelated objects put out on display perhaps because the owner is redecorating or raising money for another purpose.

  •     Now that the holiday season has drawn to a close, those stuck in their house from winter storms and a dislike of cold air may be looking for more serious diversions to lure them from their hibernation. Yet this time of year, the South Fork arts calendar typically contracts, leading to a sense of frustrated purpose.

        Fortunately, a few stout-hearted dealers have kept their venues and shows from last month open for the weeks through Martin Luther King Day, and Tripoli Gallery is one of them.

Blogs by this author: