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  • There is something spectral about the abandoned structure parked in the middle of Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton. Once erected in the woods in the no-man’s-land between Noyac and Bridgehampton, it was the temporary home of Adam Stennett in a self-created artist’s residency executed commando-style. Now, it is the centerpiece of an exhibition devoted to the work he produced there and the time he spent there called “Survival, Evasion and Escape (The Artist’s Studio).”

  • Figure Grounded
        Ille Arts in Amagansett will present “Figure and Ground” beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. The show will feature figurative work in multiple mediums organized by Vivien Bittencourt and Vincent Katz. The artists include Ms. Bittencourt, Rudy Burckhardt, Juan Gomez, Jan Henle, and Alex Katz.

     Mckay’s New Pairing
        East Hampton’s Halsey Mckay Gallery is showing works by Rachel Foullon and Ernesto Burgos through Oct. 6.

  •    Cornelia Foss has a new self-published book, “Cornelia Foss: Ten Years of Paintings and Drawings, 2003-2013,” that has more illustrations and heft than many volumes coming out of traditional presses.
    The art book industry has always been a bit do-it-yourself. Color monographs and exhibition catalogs are expensive, and publishers typically charge the venue to produce them. So why not just take it upon yourself when you have sumptuous illustrations, an introduction by Barbara Novak, and an enlightening interview with William Benton?

  • Printmaking Workshop
        Guild Hall is offering an open studio workshop with Dan Welden, with sessions on Friday, Sept. 20, from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 to 5 p.m. and on Sept. 21 at the same times.
        Participants will make an etching using the solar plate technique, which Mr. Welden has adopted and adapted to make greener and safer etchings without dangerous chemicals, according to his Web site. Images are set on a plate sensitized to light and developed using tap water.

  • The past two years were a period of rediscovery for the artist as she worked on the exhibition, “Michelle Stuart: Drawn From Nature,” on view at the Parrish Art Museum through Oct. 27.
  • On View at Horowitz
        Glenn Horowitz Bookseller is showing work by Almond Zigmund upstairs through Sept. 22 and will open a show of Adam Stennett’s work on Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • The East Hampton Historical Society has put together another richly-illustrated and installed exhibit of artifacts and material culture related to how the town’s ancestors worked, played, and dressed at a specific moment in time.
  • Optical Illusions
        The Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton is showing “Ether Scrims, Dark Rooms, and Calculative Planes,” work by Michael DeLucia, Bryan Graf, and Kate Shepherd. The three artists use “virtual and analog interventions in photography, painting, and sculpture” to explore geometry, pattern, and computation. The work is characterized by optical illusions resulting from placing multidimensional forms onto the flat planes of photography. The show is on view through Sept. 8.

  •    A documentary about junior golfers, the subject of the final film in the Hamptons International Film Festival’s SummerDocs series at Guild Hall tomorrow, wasn’t the first thing that came to mind for Josh Greenbaum when he was thinking about a new project.

  • The Garden as Art, Guild Hall’s annual tour that takes visitors behind the hedges of houses with outstanding grounds, will take place on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.