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  • “Bad Boy”
    Eric Fischl
    Crown, $26

       One of the lasting impressions I have of Eric Fischl was a night at the Parrish Art Museum, where he was in discussion with an adjunct curator about Fairfield Porter’s influences. The curator, who is no longer with the museum, had developed an elaborate theory regarding Diego Velasquez’s influence on Porter, an idea at which Mr. Fischl scoffed.

  •    On a searingly bright but breezy mid-spring day, Melville (Mickey) Straus stood on his patio wearing a purple sweater over a plaid shirt and cords with a conspiratorial twinkle in his eye. “My wife will be angry that I suggested we sit out here in the cold, but I just love being outside,” he said, grinning as he offered a warming cup of coffee. He seemed to appreciate that the panoramic view from the patio, overlooking his pool, Hook Pond, and the late afternoon golfers at the Maidstone Club, was worth a little chill in the air.

  •    Arthur Pinajian’s life and legacy combine to form one of those stories that should be made into a book or movie, and it was. Yet, it wasn’t about him specifically. Kurt Vonnegut’s novel “Bluebeard: The Autobiography of Rabo Karabekian” is about an eccentric Armenian-American painter who knew all the big boys of Abstract Expressionism but chose to paint his own art in obscurity and died unknown. This is also Pinajian’s story in brief, and the similarities in “Bluebeard” continue, but you get the idea.

  • Pots at Horowitz
        Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton will present “Jonas Wood and Shio Kusaka: Still Life With Pots” beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  •    It may appear that it’s solely the new building that’s giving the Parrish Art Museum its current buzz and vigor, and it is certainly part of the equation. But the energy emanating from Water Mill also comes from within, particularly as the Parrish gears up for its first summer season.

  • Expressionism Part II
        The Pollock-Krasner House in Springs will have a discussion called “Expressionism in the 21st Century: Part 2” on Sunday from 4 to 6 p.m. Participants will include Sally Egbert, Connie Fox, Colin Goldberg, Carol Hunt, and Haim Mizrahi. Linda Hatofsky, the widow of Julius Hatofsky, a West Coast Expressionist, will discuss her late husband’s work.
        Contributions from the audience will be welcomed. Admission is free and no reservations are required.

  •    Victorian-era houses in Southampton Village are still prevalent, but many have lost their original style and flavor due to a modern preference for a cleaner, more open feeling. At least one Victorian in the village’s downtown, however, maintains its qualities both inside and out with a sensitive renovation that retains its character while accommodating a contemporary lifestyle.

  • Albertini Presents “Stuffed”
        Sydney Albertini will present “Stuff­ed and Other Feelings . . .” at Ille Arts in Amagansett beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  •    Over several weeks last fall, late-season coastal storms and the Sandy Hook School shootings overwhelmed human emotional response. People who lost homes are still trying to put the pieces back together and those who lost loved ones will never be the same.

  •     Guild Hall’s 75th Members Show opened on Saturday and with it came the announcement of the winners selected by this year’s awards judge, Elisa­beth Sussman, curator of photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Blogs by this author:

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.

  • “White Hot + Blue” was the theme of this year’s LongHouse Reserve’s benefit in East Hampton on Saturday and the grounds and guests were done up just right.

  • Susan and Stanley Reifer will open their Bridgehampton garden on Saturday from 10 am to 3 pm. through the Garden Conservency.

    The garden was designed by Jian Guo Xu, Chinese artist who has incorporate Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism on the garden's five acres. The garden includes pavilions, bridges, and water features accessed by winding paths.

    The garden is at 5 Paumanok Road, Bridgehampton and  admission is $5.

  • The Parrish Art Museum’s sold-out Midsummer Party on Saturday night raised $1.25 million and attracted some 1,000 guests.

    The event honored Inga Maren Otto, a philanthropist, and Katharina Otto-Bernstein, a filmmaker and author.

  • Thursday night was the night to be in Bridgehampton. Long lines of cars snaked through the back roads and front roads around the Bridgehampton Museum and Nova's Ark where two annual art fairs have taken up residence for the next few days.

    It was the opening night for both ArtHamptons and Art Market Hamptons and even those with black cards, VIP passes, or other bells and whistles on their forms of entry had a tough time negotiating parking.

    Inside, however, all was lively and fun, as these photos of the Art Market Hamptons fair by Morgan McGivern demonstrate.