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  •     Guild Hall’s 75th Members Show opened on Saturday and with it came the announcement of the winners selected by this year’s awards judge, Elisa­beth Sussman, curator of photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

  • Designed from the start to work in tandem with the museum, the grounds will evoke the rural features of the area and the museum structure, which the Swiss architects describe as an “agrarian vernacular shed.”
  • Scratching the Surface
        The Southampton Cultural Center is showing “Shaping the Surface” through May 20.
         Arlene Bujese organized the show, which features work with tactile or more three-dimensional surfaces. The artists include Bob Bachler, Jim Gemake, Margaret Kerr, Pope Noell, and Charles Waller, who employ such techniques as assemblage, collage, textural application, and modeling of forms using fired clay, found objects, clay bricks, thick paint, and paper/canvas collage.

  •    Behind a black curtain, a shaft of light fell from a vent in the eaves of the South Fork Natural History Museum barn, dimly illuminating video equipment and stacks of twigs and branches. To eyes grasping for a way to make sense of the space, it was a welcome sight. To Christine Sciulli, however, it was a challenge.

  •     On Saturday, LongHouse Reserve will open its grounds for the season with a riot of daffodils and some early cherry blossoms, among the other garden’s delights — some organic and some more structural.

  • Art Gets Its Groove Back
        This weekend at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, art and music will blend to form a show driven by a dance beat. “Art Groove,” in its third year, will present 14 contemporary artists with Motown, disco, and hip-hop music.

  •     “Alice Aycock Drawings: Some Stories Are Worth Repeating,” will open this week at not one, but two venues — the Parrish Art Museum and the Grey Art Gallery at New York University.
        The show, presented in partnership with the two venues and organized by Jonathan Fineberg, an adjunct curator for the Parrish, will follow the artist’s creative process from 1971 to the present through the vital and early stages of her ideas and their development.

  •     Those who knew Marilyn Abel, and many here did through her work at the East Hampton Historical Society, book clubs, volunteer activities, and a range of other interests and passions, will remember her for her devoted friendship and dedication to social activism and the First Amendment.
        The long-time resident of East Hampton died on April 5 in Southampton Hospital after a brief illness. She was 74.

  • In an unheated beachfront cottage with a roaring fire, gourmet treats, and hot cider, Gary Ireland asked his neighbors and fellow villagers on Saturday to support his candidacy for Sagaponack Village's first mayor.

    Mr. Ireland, a lawyer who works primarily in New York but has an office in Bridgehampton, is running against Bill Tillotson, a full-time Sagaponack resident who owns a nursery and is co-chairman of the Sagaponack Citizens Advisory Committee.

  • Rolph Scarlett’s Geometrics
        Beginning next Thursday, Law­rence Fine Art in East Hampton will present a retrospective of the work of the American modernist painter Rolph Scarlett through May.
        Scarlett was a geometric abstractionist who shared affinities with Marsden Hartley, John Marin, and Joseph Stella. His varied stylistic career explored Cubism, Biomorphism, Abstract Expressionism, and Surrealism. According to the gallery, the artist worked with Jackson Pollock and also produced drip paintings.

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  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.

  • “White Hot + Blue” was the theme of this year’s LongHouse Reserve’s benefit in East Hampton on Saturday and the grounds and guests were done up just right.

  • Susan and Stanley Reifer will open their Bridgehampton garden on Saturday from 10 am to 3 pm. through the Garden Conservency.

    The garden was designed by Jian Guo Xu, Chinese artist who has incorporate Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism on the garden's five acres. The garden includes pavilions, bridges, and water features accessed by winding paths.

    The garden is at 5 Paumanok Road, Bridgehampton and  admission is $5.

  • The Parrish Art Museum’s sold-out Midsummer Party on Saturday night raised $1.25 million and attracted some 1,000 guests.

    The event honored Inga Maren Otto, a philanthropist, and Katharina Otto-Bernstein, a filmmaker and author.