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  • Designed from the start to work in tandem with the museum, the grounds will evoke the rural features of the area and the museum structure, which the Swiss architects describe as an “agrarian vernacular shed.”
  • Scratching the Surface
        The Southampton Cultural Center is showing “Shaping the Surface” through May 20.
         Arlene Bujese organized the show, which features work with tactile or more three-dimensional surfaces. The artists include Bob Bachler, Jim Gemake, Margaret Kerr, Pope Noell, and Charles Waller, who employ such techniques as assemblage, collage, textural application, and modeling of forms using fired clay, found objects, clay bricks, thick paint, and paper/canvas collage.

  •    Behind a black curtain, a shaft of light fell from a vent in the eaves of the South Fork Natural History Museum barn, dimly illuminating video equipment and stacks of twigs and branches. To eyes grasping for a way to make sense of the space, it was a welcome sight. To Christine Sciulli, however, it was a challenge.

  •     On Saturday, LongHouse Reserve will open its grounds for the season with a riot of daffodils and some early cherry blossoms, among the other garden’s delights — some organic and some more structural.

  • Art Gets Its Groove Back
        This weekend at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, art and music will blend to form a show driven by a dance beat. “Art Groove,” in its third year, will present 14 contemporary artists with Motown, disco, and hip-hop music.

  •     “Alice Aycock Drawings: Some Stories Are Worth Repeating,” will open this week at not one, but two venues — the Parrish Art Museum and the Grey Art Gallery at New York University.
        The show, presented in partnership with the two venues and organized by Jonathan Fineberg, an adjunct curator for the Parrish, will follow the artist’s creative process from 1971 to the present through the vital and early stages of her ideas and their development.

  •     Those who knew Marilyn Abel, and many here did through her work at the East Hampton Historical Society, book clubs, volunteer activities, and a range of other interests and passions, will remember her for her devoted friendship and dedication to social activism and the First Amendment.
        The long-time resident of East Hampton died on April 5 in Southampton Hospital after a brief illness. She was 74.

  • In an unheated beachfront cottage with a roaring fire, gourmet treats, and hot cider, Gary Ireland asked his neighbors and fellow villagers on Saturday to support his candidacy for Sagaponack Village's first mayor.

    Mr. Ireland, a lawyer who works primarily in New York but has an office in Bridgehampton, is running against Bill Tillotson, a full-time Sagaponack resident who owns a nursery and is co-chairman of the Sagaponack Citizens Advisory Committee.

  • Rolph Scarlett’s Geometrics
        Beginning next Thursday, Law­rence Fine Art in East Hampton will present a retrospective of the work of the American modernist painter Rolph Scarlett through May.
        Scarlett was a geometric abstractionist who shared affinities with Marsden Hartley, John Marin, and Joseph Stella. His varied stylistic career explored Cubism, Biomorphism, Abstract Expressionism, and Surrealism. According to the gallery, the artist worked with Jackson Pollock and also produced drip paintings.

  • A Polaroid image of Little Edie taken by Andy Warhol in 1976, a souvenir of the early post-film time, will be up for auction at Christie’s tomorrow. It is expected to sell for $5,000 to $7,000.

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  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.