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  • Frequent visitors to the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton are familiar with the work of Nico Yektai, even if they do not realize it. Anyone who has taken a rest on one of the commodious benches in the gallery has experienced it. The seats are remarkable in their perfect adaptation to the human form, even in their spare materials of wood, metal, and concrete.
  • It wasn’t just a dream. Music for Montauk is back again this year, and in the capable hands of Lilah Gosman and Milos Repicky, who rebooted the popular classical music series last year with some off-season events and a week of musical surprises in August. The future of the concerts had been uncertain after the death of the founder, Ruth Widder, in 2013.
  • For the past several decades, a movement has been taking shape under the radar of the art world and even the artists within it. That will change with the opening this weekend of the Parrish Art Museum’s “Radical Seafaring,” a pioneering exhibition and catalog produced by Andrea Grover that seeks to define “offshore art.”
  • Stephen Antonakos, a neon pioneer from the 1960s onward, discovered several different styles within that medium from that period until his death in 2013. From outlines of simple geometric shapes to complicated overlays on painted surfaces, and late work with neon-backlit painted wood assemblages, he found in the colorful gas tubing a visual language to explore relationships between two-dimensional and three-dimensional forms.
  • Yung Jake, an artist and rapper based in Los Angeles who grew up in Bridgehampton as Jake Patterson, will perform as part of the Museum of Modern Art’s “Slithering Screens: 10 Years of New Frontier at Sundance Institute” show tomorrow at 9 p.m. in Manhattan.
  • Jack Lenor Larsen is not someone to sit back with his feet up on his desk, head cradled in his hands, and tell you about the good old days. The designer, builder, collector, and gardener would rather talk about the pergola he recently finished or the shrub he just pruned, the book he is writing, or his plans for the future.

  • Volume, mass, negative space. These are the words that pop into your head at the Parrish Art Museum exhibition “Brian Gaman: Vanishing Point.” Whether sculptural objects or pigment prints, the works on view play with our perception.
  • Museum permanent collection shows can be confusing. Some are installed, well, permanently, and others are of the more ephemeral variety. The Museum of Modern Art’s “Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934-1954,” for example, has been up for a few months but will be a memory come May 1.
  • When considering street art, or graffiti, its transience would not be the first thing that comes to mind. Yet the elements are unkind to the type of paint preferred by those who paint al fresco (en plein air, if you like) on concrete, brick, aluminum, or other exterior surfaces.
  • There are at least two men named Andre Ethier of note: One is a baseball player and the other is a musician and artist. At the same time, Harper Levine now has two exhibition spaces bearing his name and curatorial vision, the Newtown Lane space he has occupied for many years and a new New York City space he has dubbed Harper’s Apartment.

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