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  • Building on their strong production of “Macbeth” two years ago, Morgan and Tristan Vaughan and their Roundtable Theatre Company will now tackle “Hamlet‚” beginning tomorrow at Guild Hall.

  • Every so often we need an exhibition of Jane Wilson’s paintings to remind us how spectacular an artist she truly is. Such an event is now occurring in New York City at DC Moore Gallery on the occasion of Ms. Wilson’s 90th year. “Jane Wilson at 90: East Village/East End” will be up through Saturday.

    A selective mini-retrospective, the show highlights earlier, more figurative paintings of New York City and her later South Fork-inspired abstractions, in which she aimed to capture atmosphere or the color of the air itself.

  • New Shows at Halsey Mckay

    Halsey Mckay has opened two new shows at its East Hampton gallery space. One, “Inversion Spectrum,” is a solo show of works by Corey Escoto, who uses both analog and digital processes in photography to tease the viewer into figuring out which is which, where the origin of each image lies, and how photography has adapted to contain all of the available technology.

  • Although Lee Krasner spent much of her life in Springs, it would be a mistake to neglect the contribution of Norman Lewis to “From the Margins: Lee Krasner | Norman Lewis, 1945-1952,” now at the Jewish Museum in Manhattan. The exhibition so enmeshes their work that it is difficult to divide one from the other.

    Krasner, born in Brooklyn to Russian emigres, moved here in 1945 with her husband, Jackson Pollock, and helped form the colony of artists working here who would define midcentury Modern art.

  • When first confronted with the hodgepodge of artist names from the South Fork’s past and present on view at Peter Marcelle Project in Southampton, one cannot be faulted for assuming the exhibition might be a bit of a visual mess.

  • Those who think they are starting to see Colin Goldberg everywhere are probably right. Work by the recent Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant recipient is currently on view at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton and at the Southampton Cultural Center, and he was part of a group show at the Southampton Arts Center this summer.

  • The simple yet elegant presentation of works by Hiroshi Sugimoto at the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton begins at the entrance to the gallery. Like the restrained, masterly crafted boxes he makes for his glass sculptures, the gallery has been turned into discreet packaging for the jewels within its walls.

  • It is difficult to believe that we observe the centennial of Saul Steinberg’s birth this year. Born at the very start of World War I, he is an artist who has transcended his era in quieter and yet more influential ways than many of his peers whose centenaries we have also recently marked.

  • As the skies began to darken last week on the eve of the first heavy rain in months, Susan Wood was concerned.

  • The minimal world of Mary Ellen Bartley has been in evidence in group and solo shows around the country and closer to home at the Drawing Room in East Hampton and the Parrish Art Museum, but her first New York City solo exhibition featuring her “Paperbacks” series at Yancey Richardson Gallery is something of an event.

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  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.