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  • If the list of artists at East Hampton’s Drawing Room gallery seems like the usual mishmash of gallery standbys, think again. While many of the artists are familiar to the space, the always-brilliant installation skills of the gallery directors, Emily Goldstein and Victoria Munroe, make the artwork sing in ways that are surprising and delightful.

  • Stephan Keszler, who has had a presence here with galleries in several locations, is featured in a documentary on the anonymous street artist and provocateur who calls himself Banksy.
  • In “Loop Holes,” Louise Eastman’s homespun weavings and cast bricks look perfectly at home in the barn that houses the Silas Marder Gallery exhibition space in Bridgehampton. Yet they would look equally at home in some of the South Fork’s remaining untouched classic midcentury ranches, complete with linoleum floors and Formica countertops.

  • If you’ve ever wondered who sits in the big bay window on the second floor of The Star’s office building, that would be me. It is a great perch to witness the life of the village throughout the seasons. Up in the treetops there are leaves budding, blooming, changing, and falling, sparrows peeping in, and the occasional cardinal.

  • It can be a Herculean task to clear out a business after 33 years, but that is what Bebe and Warren Johnson did last week as they said goodbye to the Race Lane storefront of Pritam & Eames to begin a semi-retirement based online and in a new showroom on Mount Desert Island, Me.

  • Building on their strong production of “Macbeth” two years ago, Morgan and Tristan Vaughan and their Roundtable Theatre Company will now tackle “Hamlet‚” beginning tomorrow at Guild Hall.

  • Every so often we need an exhibition of Jane Wilson’s paintings to remind us how spectacular an artist she truly is. Such an event is now occurring in New York City at DC Moore Gallery on the occasion of Ms. Wilson’s 90th year. “Jane Wilson at 90: East Village/East End” will be up through Saturday.

    A selective mini-retrospective, the show highlights earlier, more figurative paintings of New York City and her later South Fork-inspired abstractions, in which she aimed to capture atmosphere or the color of the air itself.

  • New Shows at Halsey Mckay

    Halsey Mckay has opened two new shows at its East Hampton gallery space. One, “Inversion Spectrum,” is a solo show of works by Corey Escoto, who uses both analog and digital processes in photography to tease the viewer into figuring out which is which, where the origin of each image lies, and how photography has adapted to contain all of the available technology.

  • Although Lee Krasner spent much of her life in Springs, it would be a mistake to neglect the contribution of Norman Lewis to “From the Margins: Lee Krasner | Norman Lewis, 1945-1952,” now at the Jewish Museum in Manhattan. The exhibition so enmeshes their work that it is difficult to divide one from the other.

    Krasner, born in Brooklyn to Russian emigres, moved here in 1945 with her husband, Jackson Pollock, and helped form the colony of artists working here who would define midcentury Modern art.

  • When first confronted with the hodgepodge of artist names from the South Fork’s past and present on view at Peter Marcelle Project in Southampton, one cannot be faulted for assuming the exhibition might be a bit of a visual mess.

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  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.