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Articles by this author:

  • The last time Victoria Bond spoke with The Star, it was 1999 and she was working on an opera that would become “Mrs. President.” In the 15 years since, she has several more operas to her credit, as well as many other musical pieces for voice, individual instruments, chamber ensembles, and orchestras.

  • The Drawing Room and its partners, Emily Goldstein and Victoria Munroe, celebrate a decade in East Hampton with a surprisingly cohesive salon-style show in its always pleasant but somewhat small gallery space.

  • There is, no doubt, something scattershot about “Attitudes,” this year’s version of the Tripoli Gallery’s annual holiday collective. (It was officially dubbed the Thanksgiving Collective, but we are so far past that now, it seems confusing to hold on to that title, as the show has been extended though Jan. 25.)

  • Is it possible the holidays are finally over? Or worse, that the long nights of winter are now here? It used to be that the six weeks between New Year’s Day and Presidents Day were a dark lonely period of reflection and hibernation. Now, they’re an arts extravaganza, if not on par with the summer, then at least more accessible to the natives.

    Herewith, six weeks of activities to keep even the most astute aficionado of cultural events busy and sated.

  • “Law & Order,” a show in its last week at Harper’s Books in East Hampton, is perfectly appropriate for the milieu. Brad Phillips, a Canadian artist, makes visual art often using text as subject matter, and not just any text but deeply evocative, assertive, assaulting, and sometimes disturbing text.

  • It’s been quite a year for Sarah Koenig. The Sagaponack native and Sag Harbor summer resident has gone from being known among a small, quirky subset of brainy public radio listeners for “This American Life” to what might be called an international sensation among a larger, quirky set of brainy podcast listeners. All for “Serial,” which has set iTunes records for being the fastest podcast to reach more than 5 million downloads and streams.

  • The ground beneath the Hamptons art fairs is shifting this summer. For the past three years, Art Southampton held its fair at the Elks Lodge on County Road 39 in Southampton and opened two weeks after ArtHamptons and Art Market Hamptons. Nick Korniloff, director of Art Southampton, said last year he liked being on the highway and opening later. Yet he announced recently that his fair will be moving to Nova’s Ark on Millstone Road in Bridgehampton in 2015 and will run from July 9 through 13, two weeks earlier than last year.

  • One of the second wave of 20th-century artists who found their way to the South Fork and used the landscape as a chief source of inspiration, Jane Freilicher died on Dec. 9 at home in New York City of complications of pneumonia. She was 90.

  • Outside of some art-world friends who lived on the East End, Ray Johnson had a tenuous association here until his ultimate performance in Sag Harbor became the stuff of local and international legend and inextricably bound him to the area. Earnest young artists have made pilgrimages here to retrace his steps and delve for meaning in his use of the numeral 13 and its factors in his age, choice of date, and room number at Baron’s Cove Inn.

  • It is the time of year when galleries often scale their offerings down, not to include less, but to show more, albeit smaller, works at friendlier price points for gift giving. As much as the art world plays by different rules, size does matter, at least when determining value.

Blogs by this author:

  • A nod for Nivola and Comden & Green, but nothing for Albee, Balaban, Broderick, Danner, or Lane.
  • With so many pre-eminent American artists associated with the East End, it is not surprising that the Whitney Museum of American Art would feature many of them in the inaugural exhibition for its new home in New York City’s meatpacking district opening to the public on Friday.

  • A gallery that has had a significant impact on Southampton Village's art scene is expanding to East Hampton.
  • Deeming it the "first unquestionably mainstream podcast," jurors said it was an "audio game-changer."
  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.