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  •     The life and achievements of David G. Rattray, a poet and translator who was born and grew up in East Hampton, will be celebrated in Manhattan next week with a day and evening of readings, film, and visual art on the 20th anniversary of his death.
        Mr. Rattray was the brother of Everett Rattray, the longtime editor and publisher of The East Hampton Star, and uncle to his son, David E. Rattray, the current editor.

  • To Fool the Eye
        Todd Norsten will be featured in the solo show “This Isn’t How It Looks” at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  •     She could have remained forever known as Richard Burton’s first wife, thrown over for Elizabeth Taylor after a slew of other affairs, but Sybil Williams Burton Christopher was not satisfied being a footnote in someone else’s biography.
        “I’m not famous,” she told The Star in 1994, “I’m notorious.” But she was resolute in not wanting “to talk about that nonsense” surrounding her first marriage, which lasted 14 years, despite the affairs.

  •    A furniture store, a trip to Cuba, a legend regarding four wolves — how does one tell and preserve the stories and history of a family aside from the oral tradition? For decades and even centuries, the answer for many households was through the assemblage of quilts.
        The Bennett family has donated two uniquely well-preserved examples of the medium to the East Hampton Historical Society, and they will be included in an exhibition of recent acquisitions planned for late spring and early summer of next year.

  • Docents Have Their Say
        Visitors to the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center may know them as interpreters and keepers of the legacy of two of the most influential artists of the 20th century who worked in our backyard. But those who know docents outside of that role, know they also like to express themselves in other ways. This weekend, for the first time, all of their creative endeavors will be brought together in a show at Ashawagh Hall that will demonstrate how much their artistic output is shaped by what they do in their day job.

  •    Pale of feature and hair and slender of form, Scott Bluedorn does not look like a ringleader or potent cultural force, but then looks can be deceiving. On a recent winter evening, he passed around a plastic container with the fruits of one of his latest projects — worm farming — as he projected slides describing its ideal conditions.

  • Time Has Come Again
        Guild Hall is now accepting entries for its annual Artist Members Exhibition, to be held from April 27 through June 1.
        This year’s awards judge is Elisabeth Sussman, the curator of photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Ms. Sussman was also a curator of the museum’s biennial exhibitions in 1993 and 2012.

  • Ille Returns to Line
        After a midwinter absence, Ille Arts in Amagansett will present “Working the Line,” an exhibition devoted to the role of line in composition and style, beginning Saturday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m.

  • The Strands of Satz
        Glenn Horowitz Bookseller will display works by Matthew Satz, an East Hampton-based artist, beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.
        “Matthew Satz: Strands” will focus on a series displaying the artist’s commitment to process and concept. According to the artist, he was inspired by both Jackson Pollock’s drip and Barnett Newman’s zip in making these minimal works, which reference both painting and sculpture.

  •    When artistic talent is just a footnote in someone’s life, strange and extraordinary things can happen. When someone’s life is already legendary, the effect can be exponential.

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