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  •     After a sojourn in Southampton last year, the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons’ garden tour, now in its 27th year, returns to East Hampton on June 15. The tour features six private gardens, complimentary admission to the Much Ado About Madoo garden market sale in Sagaponack, and a separate cocktail reception.
        Highlights include the gardens of two landscape designers, Craig James Socia’s Craigmoor property on Accabonac Road and that of Michael Derrig and his wife, Dwyer, on Buell Lane Extension.

  • Lights, Camera, Action
        QF Gallery in East Hampton will open Annika Connor’s show “The Hitchcock Kiss” on Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  •     In addition to the “Artists & Writers: They Played in the Game” exhibition, Guild Hall will open its summer season with two other new shows: works by John Alexander and Joel Perlman.
        Mr. Alexander is known for his Surrealist paintings of natural phenomena and the human form as well as his biting social commentary. In a solo show opening on Saturday he will present recent natural landscapes.

  •    The perils of being a fair-skinned beachgoer are legion, particularly at the beginning of the summer when no manner of sunscreen seems to protect one from the inevitable beach nap burn.
        It takes place every year on the first day at the beach when sunscreen is seemingly carefully applied to face and body and an umbrella adds extra protection. This time of year, unless you have a wetsuit, swimming is not the object of visiting the beach. The ocean’s calming sound and pretty majesty are the primary sources of its appeal now.

  • Four Women at Ille
        Ille Arts in Amagansett will show the artwork of Monica Banks, Suzanne Goldenberg, Janet Nolan, and Nicole Parcher in a show called “Four Women” beginning tomorrow with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • East End Photogs at 25
        The East End Photographers Group will observe its 25th anniversary with a show at Ashawagh Hall in Springs opening Saturday and running through June 9. This will be the first of a number of shows in the area this season to mark the milestone. The group has dedicated this one to the memory of Tim Lee and Vito Sisti, who both died this year.

  • “Bad Boy”
    Eric Fischl
    Crown, $26

       One of the lasting impressions I have of Eric Fischl was a night at the Parrish Art Museum, where he was in discussion with an adjunct curator about Fairfield Porter’s influences. The curator, who is no longer with the museum, had developed an elaborate theory regarding Diego Velasquez’s influence on Porter, an idea at which Mr. Fischl scoffed.

  •    On a searingly bright but breezy mid-spring day, Melville (Mickey) Straus stood on his patio wearing a purple sweater over a plaid shirt and cords with a conspiratorial twinkle in his eye. “My wife will be angry that I suggested we sit out here in the cold, but I just love being outside,” he said, grinning as he offered a warming cup of coffee. He seemed to appreciate that the panoramic view from the patio, overlooking his pool, Hook Pond, and the late afternoon golfers at the Maidstone Club, was worth a little chill in the air.

  •    Arthur Pinajian’s life and legacy combine to form one of those stories that should be made into a book or movie, and it was. Yet, it wasn’t about him specifically. Kurt Vonnegut’s novel “Bluebeard: The Autobiography of Rabo Karabekian” is about an eccentric Armenian-American painter who knew all the big boys of Abstract Expressionism but chose to paint his own art in obscurity and died unknown. This is also Pinajian’s story in brief, and the similarities in “Bluebeard” continue, but you get the idea.

  • Pots at Horowitz
        Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton will present “Jonas Wood and Shio Kusaka: Still Life With Pots” beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

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