Author Information

Articles by this author:

  • “Men of Fire” Opens
        Today the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs opens “Men of Fire: Jose Clemente Orozco and Jackson Pollock,” an exhibition organized by Helen Harrison and Sarah Powers that examines how Orozco’s art influenced a young Pollock.

  •    After its second go-round on the grounds of the Bridgehampton Historical Society, the artMRKT fair announced steady sales and 7,000 visitors during its run from July 19 through 22.
       Max Fishko, who founded the fair with Jeffrey Wainhause in 2011, said in a release that this year’s event “once again proved that there is a need and a great opportunity for a contemporary fair like artMRKT.” He also let it be known that the pair would be planning another one for next year.

  •    As an art photographer, Mary Ellen Bartley may have had a long gestational period, but after finding her muse not all that long ago, her career has taken off on a steady upward trajectory.
        Her still-life images of books have been recognized five times in Guild Hall member shows, four years in a row for best photograph, and this year with top honors by Lilly Wei, a critic for Art in America and other publications. In return she will receive a solo show at Guild Hall in 2014.

  • Halsey Mckay Presents Three
        The Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton is presenting Ryan Travis Christian in “Something, Something, Black Something,” and “Friends,” a two-person show of new work by Sara Greenberger Rafferty and Andrew Kuo, through Aug. 7.

  •    Shades of coral, spring green, magenta, and the ever popular blue are some of the signature hues of this year’s Hampton Designer Showhouse in Water Mill.

  •    It was a Thursday afternoon, and Monica Banks was home listening to NPR. But it could have been any day, really, as long as she was at work in her East Hampton Village studio or in the workroom she keeps in her house.
        The fact that the artist works to the jumbled sounds of nations crumbling, world economies sputtering, talking heads debating health care reform, or, perhaps in lighter moments, the poignant oral histories of “Storycorps” resonates in her artistic output and seems to urge her along in her practice.

  • Fireplace Opens Koh
        A solo show by Terence Koh, “yes, pleased,” will open at the Fireplace Project in Springs tomorrow. In his first presentation at the gallery, Mr. Koh will offer a variety of mediums drawn from his work in drawing, sculpture, video, performance, and the Internet.

  •    Beginning this weekend a series of July art fairs will erect tents in a variety of fields from Bridgehampton to South­ampton, offering attendees a pleasant environment to see work from galleries from the East End to Europe and beyond under one roof while benefiting some local nonprofit organizations.
        First up is the oldest, ArtHamptons, which will begin its fifth iteration today at Nova’s Ark Project in Bridgehampton with two benefit previews for the LongHouse Reserve. It will remain open through Sunday.

  •    Stony Brook Southampton announced last week that Christine Vachon, an independent filmmaker, has joined its faculty to begin the process of establishing a graduate program in film on the campus.

  •    Guild Hall has a full lineup of films, concerts, and other events for this week that should appeal to everyone in one form or another.

Blogs by this author:

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.