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  •    On Saturday, the East Hampton Historical Society will present a daylong illustrated seminar on famous and infamous antiques fakes and forgeries with Charles F. Hummel.
       Mr. Hummel, an expert on antiques and American decorative arts, is the author of “With Hammer in Hand: The Dominy Craftsmen of East Hampton.” He has documented the Dominy family as well as the history of East Hampton and is the retired senior director of the Winterthur Museum in Delaware, one of the most important collections of American decorative arts.

  • Therapy in Numbers
        Beginning Saturday, Harper’s Books in East Hampton will present “Group Therapy,” an exhibition of paintings, photographs, and mixed-media works. The artists, who all work on eastern Long Island, include Linda K. Alpern, Mary Ellen Bartley, Philippe Cheng, Peter Dayton, David Diskin, Jameson Ellis, Sunny Khalsa, Laurie Lambrecht, Liliya Lifanova, Steve Miller, Peter Sabbeth, Bastienne Schmidt, Matt Satz, Michael Solomon, Kevin Teare, Ross Watts, and Nick Weber.

  •    The story of the building known as the E. and C. Bennett Blacksmith Shop at the South­ampton Historical Museum began and ended with a tree.
        The shop building, complete with a functioning forge, was originally built from local oaks in about 1790, moved to the museum from Hampton Road in the 1970s, and was restored in the 1990s. There it stood until Aug. 28

  •    The Parrish Art Museum will celebrate Anne Porter’s life and her contributions to the arts and letters of the East End on Saturday at 3 p.m.
       Ms. Porter, a poet who was a National Book Award finalist, was married to Fairfield Porter, an artist with whom she raised a family on South Main Street in Southampton. She died in October, just shy of her 100th birthday.

  •    Sometimes a play needs a grand vision. Sometimes it needs a minimal touch. But sometimes, it needs both. Josh Perl and Peter-Tolin Baker have brought both to bear on a late Tennessee Williams play “In the Bar of a Toyko Hotel,” which opens next Thursday in Bridgehampton.

  • Groovy in Springs
        Music and art will merge at Ashawagh Hall this weekend with the second annual presentation of “Art Groove,” an exhibition of work by 14 artists paired with music with a dance beat, including Motown, disco, and hip-hop styles.

  • New at the Monkey
        The Crazy Monkey Gallery in Amagansett will feature work by three members of its artists cooperative — Barbara Bilotta, Lance Corey, and Wilhelmina Howe — beginning tomorrow.
        Ms. Bilotta attended the fine arts program at the State University at Stony Brook. An “abstract impressionist,” she said she uses “the flow of colors and their relationship to trigger the imagination.”

  • “Rome”
    Robert Hughes
    Knopf, $35

  •    When one thinks of garden and landscape photography, it is often of color-saturated vistas and floral abundance. But when Leslie Rose Close gave a talk on Sunday afternoon about the history of garden photography, it was some time before the first color slide appeared, and the effect was jarring.

  •    Purists may sniff at giving up an entire museum show to a single private collector and — in the Parrish Art Museum’s case — putting art on the wall that is from an entirely different region of the country. Yet there is an argument to be made for the “EST-3: Southern California in New York-Los Angeles Art from the Beth Rudin DeWoody Collection” exhibition, and the museum and its curator have made it well.

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  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.

  • “White Hot + Blue” was the theme of this year’s LongHouse Reserve’s benefit in East Hampton on Saturday and the grounds and guests were done up just right.

  • Susan and Stanley Reifer will open their Bridgehampton garden on Saturday from 10 am to 3 pm. through the Garden Conservency.

    The garden was designed by Jian Guo Xu, Chinese artist who has incorporate Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism on the garden's five acres. The garden includes pavilions, bridges, and water features accessed by winding paths.

    The garden is at 5 Paumanok Road, Bridgehampton and  admission is $5.

  • The Parrish Art Museum’s sold-out Midsummer Party on Saturday night raised $1.25 million and attracted some 1,000 guests.

    The event honored Inga Maren Otto, a philanthropist, and Katharina Otto-Bernstein, a filmmaker and author.

  • Thursday night was the night to be in Bridgehampton. Long lines of cars snaked through the back roads and front roads around the Bridgehampton Museum and Nova's Ark where two annual art fairs have taken up residence for the next few days.

    It was the opening night for both ArtHamptons and Art Market Hamptons and even those with black cards, VIP passes, or other bells and whistles on their forms of entry had a tough time negotiating parking.

    Inside, however, all was lively and fun, as these photos of the Art Market Hamptons fair by Morgan McGivern demonstrate. 

  • An auction benefiting LongHouse Reserve is open for bidding now at Paddle 8. The sale is being held in conjunction with the East Hampton garden and art center’s annual benefit on July 19.

  • Filmmakers participating in the Stony Brook Southampton’s summer shorts 20-day intensive production workshop were given a warm welcome on Monday with an opening discussion with Todd Haynes, the director of “Far from Heaven,” “Velvet Goldmine,” “I’m Not There,” “Mildred Pierce,” “Safe,” and many other original and provocative films.