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Articles by this author:

  •     Robert W. Dash, a painter, poet, and extraordinary gardener, died after a long illness at Madoo, his home in Sagaponack, on Saturday. He was 82.

  • There is something spectral about the abandoned structure parked in the middle of Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton. Once erected in the woods in the no-man’s-land between Noyac and Bridgehampton, it was the temporary home of Adam Stennett in a self-created artist’s residency executed commando-style. Now, it is the centerpiece of an exhibition devoted to the work he produced there and the time he spent there called “Survival, Evasion and Escape (The Artist’s Studio).”

  • Figure Grounded
        Ille Arts in Amagansett will present “Figure and Ground” beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. The show will feature figurative work in multiple mediums organized by Vivien Bittencourt and Vincent Katz. The artists include Ms. Bittencourt, Rudy Burckhardt, Juan Gomez, Jan Henle, and Alex Katz.

     Mckay’s New Pairing
        East Hampton’s Halsey Mckay Gallery is showing works by Rachel Foullon and Ernesto Burgos through Oct. 6.

  • Printmaking Workshop
        Guild Hall is offering an open studio workshop with Dan Welden, with sessions on Friday, Sept. 20, from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 to 5 p.m. and on Sept. 21 at the same times.
        Participants will make an etching using the solar plate technique, which Mr. Welden has adopted and adapted to make greener and safer etchings without dangerous chemicals, according to his Web site. Images are set on a plate sensitized to light and developed using tap water.

  • On View at Horowitz
        Glenn Horowitz Bookseller is showing work by Almond Zigmund upstairs through Sept. 22 and will open a show of Adam Stennett’s work on Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • Optical Illusions
        The Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton is showing “Ether Scrims, Dark Rooms, and Calculative Planes,” work by Michael DeLucia, Bryan Graf, and Kate Shepherd. The three artists use “virtual and analog interventions in photography, painting, and sculpture” to explore geometry, pattern, and computation. The work is characterized by optical illusions resulting from placing multidimensional forms onto the flat planes of photography. The show is on view through Sept. 8.

  •    A documentary about junior golfers, the subject of the final film in the Hamptons International Film Festival’s SummerDocs series at Guild Hall tomorrow, wasn’t the first thing that came to mind for Josh Greenbaum when he was thinking about a new project.

  • QF Gallery’s Tete-a-Tete
        Mickalene Thomas will serve as curator for the next QF Gallery show, opening on Saturday in East Hampton. The show features work by Derrick Adams, Zachary Fabri, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Deana Lawson, Nicole Miller, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Hannah Price, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Malick Sidibe, Xaviera Simmons, Mickalene Thomas, and Hank Willis Thomas. It includes video and photography from Africa and the United States.

  •    Paula Poundstone will get to her performance at the Bay Street Theatre on Monday much the way she usually does. “I arrive on an airplane and I remember that it’s a long drive in from where I fly,” the comedian said, speaking from her home in Los Angeles. “I take a quick nap, eat dinner, take a shower, and go to work.”

  • Modernism at Vered
        Vered Gallery in East Hampton is currently recognizing the centenary of American Modernism with a show featuring the work of some of its earliest practioners. “Celebrating 100 Years of American Modernism 1913-2013” will be on view through Sept. 12.    

Blogs by this author:

  •      Elizabeth Dow, whose wall coverings and fabrics have been installed in the White House and in the private homes of Paul Simon, Harrison Ford, and Bill Gates to name a few, actually got her start as a painter and she continues in that medium to this day. Many of her recent works went on view at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday in a show called "Heaven" and will stay there until May 19.

  •      LongHouse Reserve offered a preview to both a sale of textiles from the collection of Jack Lenor Larsen and to what patrons will see on Saturday when the gardens open to the public for the season.

  •      If you look up Sammy’s Beach on the Internet, you are given maps, a lot of real estate listings, and a few photographs of a bay beach, typically with a lot of tire ruts. On Instagram it’s different, more arty shots of wind blown waves on a rocky shore, abstract amalgamations of jingle shells and seaweed, dramatic sunsets, and the like.

  •      The Spring Fling at the Parrish Art Museum may have been causing delays on the highway in front of its Water Mill headquarters, but over in East Hampton several gallery exhibitions opening on Saturday night, kept many residents close to home.

  •      If you think the tabs on pop top cans are mundane subject matter,  Alice Hope will likely change your mind with a show at  the Ricco Maresca Gallery in Chelsea. There, viewers will find a range of tab-inspired artworks that either incorporate the small metal pieces of  flotsam, elevate the form to sizable hanging sculpture, or come up with other interpretations wholly unique to the artist.

  •      Shigeru Ban, an architect known for both high-end and humanitarian projects using environmentally sensitive and recycled materials, has won this year's Pritzker Architecture Prize it was announced Monday.

  •      I had not planned on going to the Art Dealers Association of America show at the Park Avenue Armory so late. Initially, it was on my schedule for Thursday as my first drop in of the weekend, but I got in later than I thought, other plans arose, and the next thing I knew it was Sunday and it was quiet.

  •      Despite a reported increase in "fair fatigue" among dealers and collectors and a warm sunny day outside, the Armory Show packed the piers on Saturday with long lines to get in and crowded aisles and booths all afternoon. There were 205 exhibitors spread among two piers with 146 in the contemporary section and 59 in the modern section.
         While few dealers in the contemporary section featured East End artists, the modern selection had a good representation, both past and present.

  •      Seeming oddly out of the way in Soho, once the nexus of the contemporary art world, Volta NY offered a mostly focused presentation at its annual satellite fair during Armory art week in New York City.
         It was also the only fair in the city this week that attracted South Fork dealers: Halsey Mckay Gallery from East Hampton and Sara Nightingale Gallery from Water Mill. The fair was invitational and restricted to solo shows.