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  • Those who think they are starting to see Colin Goldberg everywhere are probably right. Work by the recent Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant recipient is currently on view at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton and at the Southampton Cultural Center, and he was part of a group show at the Southampton Arts Center this summer.

  • The simple yet elegant presentation of works by Hiroshi Sugimoto at the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton begins at the entrance to the gallery. Like the restrained, masterly crafted boxes he makes for his glass sculptures, the gallery has been turned into discreet packaging for the jewels within its walls.

  • It is difficult to believe that we observe the centennial of Saul Steinberg’s birth this year. Born at the very start of World War I, he is an artist who has transcended his era in quieter and yet more influential ways than many of his peers whose centenaries we have also recently marked.

  • As the skies began to darken last week on the eve of the first heavy rain in months, Susan Wood was concerned.

  • The minimal world of Mary Ellen Bartley has been in evidence in group and solo shows around the country and closer to home at the Drawing Room in East Hampton and the Parrish Art Museum, but her first New York City solo exhibition featuring her “Paperbacks” series at Yancey Richardson Gallery is something of an event.

  • The Museum of Modern Art will present a survey of Robert Gober’s career, spanning four decades, beginning on Saturday.

    The artist, who has had a house in Peconic since 1990, is known for his enigmatic sculptures of everyday objects with a twist, large installations, and drawings and prints. The work is often minimal but charged with narrative and allusions to religion, politics, and sexuality.

  • Walking into Guild Hall in East Hampton these days is like walking into a Sistine Chapel composed of text. Barbara Kruger’s installation has so thoroughly transformed the architecture of the Moran Gallery that walls fade away and ceilings are obliterated with colossal sans serif white type against a glossy black background.

  • Every year there are at least one or two books that seek to capitalize on the “Hamptons style” whether it be food, art, architecture, environs, lifestyle, or decor. They can often be expensive and hollow affairs, produced chiefly for last-minute purchases at BookHampton for a host or hostess gift.

  • It is difficult to believe that we observe the centennial of Saul Steinberg’s birth this year. Born at the very start of World War I, he is an artist who has transcended his era in quieter and yet more influential ways than many of his peers whose centenaries we have also recently marked.

  • This past year, some of recent history’s more creative and flamboyant spirits have discovered and interacted with an eccentric and eclectic monument to the artistic pursuits of one of their own. That the artist was Barney Rosset, known primarily for his championing of literature and film, surprised most. But the artifact he created stunned all.

    What they saw was a 12-by-22-foot wall-spanning mural, as ambitious as it is idiosyncratic, and a true emblem of the 20th century, even though it was conceived during the 21st.

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  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.