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  • Thomas Moran Celebrated
        A Victorian garden party hosted by the East Hampton Historical Society will kick off the society’s exhibition “Moran: A Family Celebration of Home and Place,” on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. 
        Chilled tea, lavender lemonade, pound cake with rose petals, sugared violets, and even Victorian children’s games will be part of the festivities, which will be in the garden behind Clinton Academy. All are welcome and there is no charge for the exhibition or the garden party.

  •    Erudite and warm, droll but unaffected, Margery and Sheldon Harnick are like many successful couples who call the South Fork their second home. Their faces may not be immediately recognizable to hoi polloi, but they are secure in their accomplishments and here to relax, saving their socializing for theater events in the city.

  • Erica Jong was angry at times on Saturday night when she spoke at BookHampton’s East Hampton store. 

  •    The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons will open its thrift store doors on Saturday night for a preview cocktail party to showcase the work of several prominent New York designers who will transform its inventory of gently used treasures into rooms worthy of a style doyenne.

  •     The Bay Street Theatre’s first play of the summer season is Geraldine Aron’s “My Brilliant Divorce,” starring Polly Draper. This will be the American premiere of the play, which will start in previews on Tuesday and run through June 24.
        The production is directed by Matt McGrath, one of Bay Street’s artistic associates.

  • Warhol Back in Town
        Glenn Horowitz Bookseller will celebrate its return to East Hampton this summer, in a new space at 87 Newtown Lane, by offering “Andy Warhol: Montauk Photos from the Hedges Collection,” opening on Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • Lichtenstein Retrospective
        The Art Institute of Chicago on Tuesday will open the largest exhibition to date of Roy Lichtenstein’s work —  more than 160 works, including drawings, paintings, and sculpture, from more than three decades, some of which have never been seen publicly.

  •     Those who might be tired of the same old East Hampton houses can have a taste of Southampton living this weekend with the Insider’s View of Southampton Homes tour offered by the Southampton Historical Museum on Saturday from 1 to 4:30 p.m.

  •    July will be full of creative exploration at the Stony Brook Southampton campus. As part of a long-term vision of transforming the campus into a graduate-level facility for the study of various art disciplines, the school will continue and expand upon its summer offerings this year, redesigned and redesignated as Southampton Arts Summer.

  •    There are certain prolific artists whose works always turn up at art fairs or secondary-market galleries. They may be widely popular, but with so much output they risk not always being seen in the best light. Even the best artists have their bad days, or at least their mediocre ones.

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  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.