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  • Vered Auction
        Vered Gallery in East Hampton will hold a reception for its 14th annual July Silent Art Auction on Saturday from 9 to 11 p.m. The auction will benefit Sheba Hospital’s post-traumatic stress disorder center.

  • Tria Giovan’s moody and restrained evocations of the Sagaponack shoreline, the subject of a new book and exhibition, were taken over the course of a decade.
  •     Two photography exhibitions at the Parrish Art Museum will open to the public on Sunday, following special previews and talks on Saturday. The shows are “Liminal Ground: Adam Bartos Long Island Photographs, 2009-2011” and “The Landmarks of New York,” which was organized by Barbaralee Diamondstein-Spielvogel.

  • Schoultz New at Firestone
        The Eric Firestone Gallery in East Hampton will bring the work of Andrew Schoultz, a San Francisco artist, to East Hampton beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.
        “Ex Uno Plura” — or from one, many — is the inverse of e pluribus unum (from many, one), a United States motto seen on our currency. The exhibition will include a mural and works reflecting on the American flag.

  •     In any other format or site, a container show is pretty much what you would expect it to be, a lovely but restrained affair. The LongHouse Reserve, however, is anything but typical. Its container show burst out of its confined format practically from the beginning.

  • Jean Kemper Hoffmann, one of the remaining figures of the mid-20th-century artists colony in Springs, died on June 4 in New York City.
        Ms. Hoffmann, a writer, poet, and political activist, began coming to Springs in 1949 with her second husband, Arnold Hoffmann Jr., an art director for The New York Times Magazine and an artist specializing in prints. They first visited a small summer cottage on Three Mile Harbor and fell in love with the place, she told The Star last year.

  •    Upon hearing that a Moran family show is opening in East Hampton, it is difficult not to prepare for disappointment. Despite the rich history the family has in this village and town, it seems that it is always the usual few things that are trotted out — a palette from the library here, some etchings there, a couple of paintings from Guild Hall. There is a decent representation to be had from the typical local vaults, but all items are a little too familiar at this point to be worth taking much notice of.

  •    With the first of the busy weekends of summer behind us, everyone could use a little peace and tranquillity in a well-tended garden. It would be even better to be in someone else’s Eden, where each little weed or withered blossom is not an invitation to get to work.

  • Markus at Ille
        Ille Arts in Amagansett will present Liz Markus, a New York City artist, in “11,” opening on Saturday evening at 6. For those who know the cult classic “This Is Spinal Tap,” the title indeed refers to the number the amplifiers go to. Just as in the movie, the paintings are intended to be “one louder.” There is little subtlety in the confident brush-strokes and saturated colors on unprimed canvases.

  •     Landscape Pleasures: Down the Garden Path, the Parrish Art Museum’s annual two-day horticultural event and fund-raiser, will be held this weekend.

Blogs by this author:

  • A nod for Nivola and Comden & Green, but nothing for Albee, Balaban, Broderick, Danner, or Lane.
  • With so many pre-eminent American artists associated with the East End, it is not surprising that the Whitney Museum of American Art would feature many of them in the inaugural exhibition for its new home in New York City’s meatpacking district opening to the public on Friday.

  • A gallery that has had a significant impact on Southampton Village's art scene is expanding to East Hampton.
  • Deeming it the "first unquestionably mainstream podcast," jurors said it was an "audio game-changer."
  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.