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  • For Black History Month
        The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month with an exhibit titled “Visual Heritage III: 4 Contemporary Artists” opening on Wednesday in the center’s gallery on Pond Lane.

  • A rare, tall-case alarm clock made in East Hampton in 1798 by the Dominy family was sold at auction at Sotheby's in New York on Saturday to an unidentified bidder, who will pay $110,500.
  • Show Says Thanks
        Hampton Photo, Arts, and Framing of Bridgehampton will present “The Thank You Art Show” at Ashawagh Hall in Springs this weekend, beginning with a reception on Saturday evening from 5:30 to 11. It will be on view on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. as well. The theme is giving thanks to the shop’s friends and customers. More than 100 artists will participate in the mediums of painting, photography, sculpture, origami, and more.

  • Every small town has its traditions, lore, and characters that it takes for granted. What becomes fascinating is what happens when those same memes are refracted through an outsider’s lens. The latest East Hampton tradition to achieve a new life through this type of treatment is the town’s junior lifeguard and ocean rescue programs, the subjects of a documentary in progress. The film promises, like so many documentaries, to bring fresh insight and perhaps even fame to an institution old-timers here simply take for granted.

  •     A tall-case alarm clock made by Nathaniel Dominy IV in East Hampton in 1788 will be auctioned in a sale taking place at Sotheby’s tomorrow and Saturday. The clock is thought to be the first alarm clock that the artisan made and is rare for early American clockmakers, who often imported their clockworks from Europe instead of crafting them themselves.

  • John McWhinnie Jr., an art and rare book dealer known for his eclectic and inspired exhibits, both in East Hampton and New York City, died in a snorkeling accident on Friday
  •    Although I constantly see art that I am moved to talk or write about that falls outside of my usual geographical constraints at The Star, few exhibits have challenged my actual perception of art, and particularly sculpture, as much as the current installation “Maurizio Cattlelan: All” at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

  •    Although I constantly see art that I am moved to talk or write about that falls outside of my usual geographical constraints at The Star, few exhibits have challenged my actual perception of art, and particularly sculpture, as much as the current installation “Maurizio Cattelan: All” at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

  • New Year, New Art
        “Art in the New Year” is the next show at Ashawagh Hall this weekend. The show will feature work by Cynthia Loewen, Mary Milne, Stephanie Reit, and Lewis Zacks. Ms. Loewen has a long résumé of exhibits and memberships in numerous South Fork arts groups. A painting of hers was featured in the short film “The Sea Is All I Know,” which was shown at the Hamptons International Film Festival. She is also a curator.

  • By all accounts, the exhaustive and redefining Willem de Kooning retrospective on the Museum of Modern Art’s entire sixth floor is a blockbuster, and an opportunity to come to terms with the artist’s unique contribution to 20th-century art.

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