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  • Thomas Moran Celebrated
        A Victorian garden party hosted by the East Hampton Historical Society will kick off the society’s exhibition “Moran: A Family Celebration of Home and Place,” on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. 
        Chilled tea, lavender lemonade, pound cake with rose petals, sugared violets, and even Victorian children’s games will be part of the festivities, which will be in the garden behind Clinton Academy. All are welcome and there is no charge for the exhibition or the garden party.

  •    Erudite and warm, droll but unaffected, Margery and Sheldon Harnick are like many successful couples who call the South Fork their second home. Their faces may not be immediately recognizable to hoi polloi, but they are secure in their accomplishments and here to relax, saving their socializing for theater events in the city.

  • Erica Jong was angry at times on Saturday night when she spoke at BookHampton’s East Hampton store. 

  •    The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons will open its thrift store doors on Saturday night for a preview cocktail party to showcase the work of several prominent New York designers who will transform its inventory of gently used treasures into rooms worthy of a style doyenne.

  •     The Bay Street Theatre’s first play of the summer season is Geraldine Aron’s “My Brilliant Divorce,” starring Polly Draper. This will be the American premiere of the play, which will start in previews on Tuesday and run through June 24.
        The production is directed by Matt McGrath, one of Bay Street’s artistic associates.

  • Warhol Back in Town
        Glenn Horowitz Bookseller will celebrate its return to East Hampton this summer, in a new space at 87 Newtown Lane, by offering “Andy Warhol: Montauk Photos from the Hedges Collection,” opening on Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • Lichtenstein Retrospective
        The Art Institute of Chicago on Tuesday will open the largest exhibition to date of Roy Lichtenstein’s work —  more than 160 works, including drawings, paintings, and sculpture, from more than three decades, some of which have never been seen publicly.

  •     Those who might be tired of the same old East Hampton houses can have a taste of Southampton living this weekend with the Insider’s View of Southampton Homes tour offered by the Southampton Historical Museum on Saturday from 1 to 4:30 p.m.

  •    July will be full of creative exploration at the Stony Brook Southampton campus. As part of a long-term vision of transforming the campus into a graduate-level facility for the study of various art disciplines, the school will continue and expand upon its summer offerings this year, redesigned and redesignated as Southampton Arts Summer.

  •    There are certain prolific artists whose works always turn up at art fairs or secondary-market galleries. They may be widely popular, but with so much output they risk not always being seen in the best light. Even the best artists have their bad days, or at least their mediocre ones.

Blogs by this author:

  • A nod for Nivola and Comden & Green, but nothing for Albee, Balaban, Broderick, Danner, or Lane.
  • With so many pre-eminent American artists associated with the East End, it is not surprising that the Whitney Museum of American Art would feature many of them in the inaugural exhibition for its new home in New York City’s meatpacking district opening to the public on Friday.

  • A gallery that has had a significant impact on Southampton Village's art scene is expanding to East Hampton.
  • Deeming it the "first unquestionably mainstream podcast," jurors said it was an "audio game-changer."
  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.