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  •    Initially, it might be difficult to reconcile Dan Flavin’s Expressionist tendencies with his use of the quite literally linear form of long, colored fluorescent lightbulbs to express himself for most of his creative life. Yet a new exhibition of his drawings at the Morgan Library demonstrates that his stylistic influences were varied and well outside of the Minimalist milieu with which he is primarily associated.

  •    On Saturday, the East Hampton Historical Society will present a daylong illustrated seminar on famous and infamous antiques fakes and forgeries with Charles F. Hummel.
       Mr. Hummel, an expert on antiques and American decorative arts, is the author of “With Hammer in Hand: The Dominy Craftsmen of East Hampton.” He has documented the Dominy family as well as the history of East Hampton and is the retired senior director of the Winterthur Museum in Delaware, one of the most important collections of American decorative arts.

  • Therapy in Numbers
        Beginning Saturday, Harper’s Books in East Hampton will present “Group Therapy,” an exhibition of paintings, photographs, and mixed-media works. The artists, who all work on eastern Long Island, include Linda K. Alpern, Mary Ellen Bartley, Philippe Cheng, Peter Dayton, David Diskin, Jameson Ellis, Sunny Khalsa, Laurie Lambrecht, Liliya Lifanova, Steve Miller, Peter Sabbeth, Bastienne Schmidt, Matt Satz, Michael Solomon, Kevin Teare, Ross Watts, and Nick Weber.

  •    The story of the building known as the E. and C. Bennett Blacksmith Shop at the South­ampton Historical Museum began and ended with a tree.
        The shop building, complete with a functioning forge, was originally built from local oaks in about 1790, moved to the museum from Hampton Road in the 1970s, and was restored in the 1990s. There it stood until Aug. 28

  •    The Parrish Art Museum will celebrate Anne Porter’s life and her contributions to the arts and letters of the East End on Saturday at 3 p.m.
       Ms. Porter, a poet who was a National Book Award finalist, was married to Fairfield Porter, an artist with whom she raised a family on South Main Street in Southampton. She died in October, just shy of her 100th birthday.

  •    Sometimes a play needs a grand vision. Sometimes it needs a minimal touch. But sometimes, it needs both. Josh Perl and Peter-Tolin Baker have brought both to bear on a late Tennessee Williams play “In the Bar of a Toyko Hotel,” which opens next Thursday in Bridgehampton.

  • Groovy in Springs
        Music and art will merge at Ashawagh Hall this weekend with the second annual presentation of “Art Groove,” an exhibition of work by 14 artists paired with music with a dance beat, including Motown, disco, and hip-hop styles.

  • New at the Monkey
        The Crazy Monkey Gallery in Amagansett will feature work by three members of its artists cooperative — Barbara Bilotta, Lance Corey, and Wilhelmina Howe — beginning tomorrow.
        Ms. Bilotta attended the fine arts program at the State University at Stony Brook. An “abstract impressionist,” she said she uses “the flow of colors and their relationship to trigger the imagination.”

  • “Rome”
    Robert Hughes
    Knopf, $35

  •    When one thinks of garden and landscape photography, it is often of color-saturated vistas and floral abundance. But when Leslie Rose Close gave a talk on Sunday afternoon about the history of garden photography, it was some time before the first color slide appeared, and the effect was jarring.

Blogs by this author:

  • A nod for Nivola and Comden & Green, but nothing for Albee, Balaban, Broderick, Danner, or Lane.
  • With so many pre-eminent American artists associated with the East End, it is not surprising that the Whitney Museum of American Art would feature many of them in the inaugural exhibition for its new home in New York City’s meatpacking district opening to the public on Friday.

  • A gallery that has had a significant impact on Southampton Village's art scene is expanding to East Hampton.
  • Deeming it the "first unquestionably mainstream podcast," jurors said it was an "audio game-changer."
  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.