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  •    With our first winter storm behind us, some South Fork denizens may find themselves hunkered down in front of the fire, Wii, DVR or DVD player, or all of the above. Kate Mueth has other ideas though, for her and for us, if we are so inclined.

  •    Necessity breeds invention and eventually, the disparate but common threads of the East Hampton artistic community were bound to find a way to reknit themselves into a haphazard whole.
        Cynthia Loewen, an artist who found herself longing for the company of her colleagues between too infrequent events, said last week that she decided that what was missing was a place to regularly gather and share ideas and problems, that they could truly call their own.

  • Madoo Benefit Photo Show
        Diana Frank will share her photography at Pierre’s restaurant in Bridgehampton beginning with a reception on Saturday afternoon from 3 to 6 p.m.

  • A rare, tall-case alarm clock made in East Hampton in 1798 by the Dominy family was sold at auction at Sotheby’s in New York on Saturday to an unidentified bidder. With a buyer’s premium — the surcharge an auction house attaches to sales — the final price was $110,500. The clock’s pre-sale estimate was $50,000 to $100,000.

  • Saturday will mark what would have been Jackson Pollock’s centennial birthday, and to inaugurate a year of events, the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs will screen “Pollock” at the Springs Presbyterian Church on Saturday at 6 p.m.

  • For Black History Month
        The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month with an exhibit titled “Visual Heritage III: 4 Contemporary Artists” opening on Wednesday in the center’s gallery on Pond Lane.

  • A rare, tall-case alarm clock made in East Hampton in 1798 by the Dominy family was sold at auction at Sotheby's in New York on Saturday to an unidentified bidder, who will pay $110,500.
  • Show Says Thanks
        Hampton Photo, Arts, and Framing of Bridgehampton will present “The Thank You Art Show” at Ashawagh Hall in Springs this weekend, beginning with a reception on Saturday evening from 5:30 to 11. It will be on view on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. as well. The theme is giving thanks to the shop’s friends and customers. More than 100 artists will participate in the mediums of painting, photography, sculpture, origami, and more.

  • Every small town has its traditions, lore, and characters that it takes for granted. What becomes fascinating is what happens when those same memes are refracted through an outsider’s lens. The latest East Hampton tradition to achieve a new life through this type of treatment is the town’s junior lifeguard and ocean rescue programs, the subjects of a documentary in progress. The film promises, like so many documentaries, to bring fresh insight and perhaps even fame to an institution old-timers here simply take for granted.

  •     A tall-case alarm clock made by Nathaniel Dominy IV in East Hampton in 1788 will be auctioned in a sale taking place at Sotheby’s tomorrow and Saturday. The clock is thought to be the first alarm clock that the artisan made and is rare for early American clockmakers, who often imported their clockworks from Europe instead of crafting them themselves.

Blogs by this author:

  • A gallery that has had a significant impact on Southampton Village's art scene is expanding to East Hampton.
  • Deeming it the "first unquestionably mainstream podcast," jurors said it was an "audio game-changer."
  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.