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Articles by this author:

  •    Although I constantly see art that I am moved to talk or write about that falls outside of my usual geographical constraints at The Star, few exhibits have challenged my actual perception of art, and particularly sculpture, as much as the current installation “Maurizio Cattelan: All” at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

  • New Year, New Art
        “Art in the New Year” is the next show at Ashawagh Hall this weekend. The show will feature work by Cynthia Loewen, Mary Milne, Stephanie Reit, and Lewis Zacks. Ms. Loewen has a long résumé of exhibits and memberships in numerous South Fork arts groups. A painting of hers was featured in the short film “The Sea Is All I Know,” which was shown at the Hamptons International Film Festival. She is also a curator.

  • By all accounts, the exhaustive and redefining Willem de Kooning retrospective on the Museum of Modern Art’s entire sixth floor is a blockbuster, and an opportunity to come to terms with the artist’s unique contribution to 20th-century art.

  • New Shows at Vered
        Vered Gallery in East Hampton has two shows on view in January. The gallery will continue the “Landscape/ Seascape” theme with works by Robert Dash, Wolf Kahn, Thomas Hart Benton, Balcomb Greene, Thomas Moran, and Milton Avery, among others. Mr. Kahn’s “Mammoth Vista,” a massive autumnal water view from 1992, is the centerpiece of that exhibit.

  • By all accounts, the exhaustive and redefining Willem de Kooning retrospective on the Museum of Modern Art’s entire sixth floor is a blockbuster, and an opportunity to come to terms with the artist’s unique contribution to 20th-century art.

  • New Shows at Vered
        Vered Gallery in East Hampton has two shows on view in January. The gallery will continue the “Landscape/ Seascape” theme with works by Robert Dash, Wolf Kahn, Thomas Hart Benton, Balcomb Greene, Thomas Moran, and Milton Avery, among others. Mr. Kahn’s “Mammoth Vista,” a massive autumnal water view from 1992, is the centerpiece of that exhibit.

  • Those who like their Shakespeare productions out in the cool summer night air will be heartened to hear that a new festival is taking root through the Hamptons Independent Theatre Festival, more familiarly known as HITFest.

  • Ashawagh’s Illuminators
        “East End Illuminations,” a group show at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, curated by Cynthia Sobel, will feature landscapes, abstract watercolors, prints, mixed-media works, and photographs.

  •     It may have been a hay barn at one time, but Tracy and David Gavant and their daughters call it the “happy house.” The Amagansett building, just off Main Street, dates to the early 19th century, but with expansion and some updating, it feels quirky, but modern.

  •     Elizabeth Taylor’s diamonds weren’t the only items attracting interest at New York City auction houses last week. On Dec. 13, many well-heeled city and East End art aficionados gathered on the top floor of Sotheby’s Upper East Side auction house to view a small but strong collection of Jackson Pollock works rarely seen outside of the houses of the private collectors who own them.

Blogs by this author:

  • "Serial," a podcast that has now been downloaded almost 60 million times, won a Peabody award this week from the University of Georgia. The award, considered the "Pulitzer Prize for broadcasting," was announced on Monday.  It is the first time since the awards started in 1941 that the board of jurors has chosen to give a Peabody to a podcast.

    The jurors called "Serial" an "audio game-changer" and "the first unquestionably mainstream podcast."

  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.