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  •    How often does a true Hollywood ending happen in real life? Maybe more than immediately comes to mind, but still, not that often. The first film in the Hamptons International Film Festival and Guild Hall SummerDocs series, to be shown on Friday, July 6, has that Hollywood ending with an added surreal twist, and it is all a true story.

  • Vered Auction
        Vered Gallery in East Hampton will hold a reception for its 14th annual July Silent Art Auction on Saturday from 9 to 11 p.m. The auction will benefit Sheba Hospital’s post-traumatic stress disorder center.

  • Tria Giovan’s moody and restrained evocations of the Sagaponack shoreline, the subject of a new book and exhibition, were taken over the course of a decade.
  •     Two photography exhibitions at the Parrish Art Museum will open to the public on Sunday, following special previews and talks on Saturday. The shows are “Liminal Ground: Adam Bartos Long Island Photographs, 2009-2011” and “The Landmarks of New York,” which was organized by Barbaralee Diamondstein-Spielvogel.

  • Schoultz New at Firestone
        The Eric Firestone Gallery in East Hampton will bring the work of Andrew Schoultz, a San Francisco artist, to East Hampton beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.
        “Ex Uno Plura” — or from one, many — is the inverse of e pluribus unum (from many, one), a United States motto seen on our currency. The exhibition will include a mural and works reflecting on the American flag.

  •     In any other format or site, a container show is pretty much what you would expect it to be, a lovely but restrained affair. The LongHouse Reserve, however, is anything but typical. Its container show burst out of its confined format practically from the beginning.

  • Jean Kemper Hoffmann, one of the remaining figures of the mid-20th-century artists colony in Springs, died on June 4 in New York City.
        Ms. Hoffmann, a writer, poet, and political activist, began coming to Springs in 1949 with her second husband, Arnold Hoffmann Jr., an art director for The New York Times Magazine and an artist specializing in prints. They first visited a small summer cottage on Three Mile Harbor and fell in love with the place, she told The Star last year.

  •    Upon hearing that a Moran family show is opening in East Hampton, it is difficult not to prepare for disappointment. Despite the rich history the family has in this village and town, it seems that it is always the usual few things that are trotted out — a palette from the library here, some etchings there, a couple of paintings from Guild Hall. There is a decent representation to be had from the typical local vaults, but all items are a little too familiar at this point to be worth taking much notice of.

  •    With the first of the busy weekends of summer behind us, everyone could use a little peace and tranquillity in a well-tended garden. It would be even better to be in someone else’s Eden, where each little weed or withered blossom is not an invitation to get to work.

  • Markus at Ille
        Ille Arts in Amagansett will present Liz Markus, a New York City artist, in “11,” opening on Saturday evening at 6. For those who know the cult classic “This Is Spinal Tap,” the title indeed refers to the number the amplifiers go to. Just as in the movie, the paintings are intended to be “one louder.” There is little subtlety in the confident brush-strokes and saturated colors on unprimed canvases.

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