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  •     An unlikely hero, Josh Grisetti has a face like a question mark. His raised eyebrows and nose are the curve and his often agape mouth forms the dot at its base. As the protagonist of “Enter Laughing,” he can mold that face like putty, looking doltish or debonair in the span of a second.

  •     The Parrish Art Museum will open “Artists Choose Artists,” its second juried exhibit, to the public on Sunday. The show will feature groupings of one “jury” artist who was selected by the museum to choose two other artists who seemed to share affinities or stylistic similarities. The exhibit will include displays of one of the juror’s works along side those artists chosen by the juror.

  • Pollock’s Politics
        Michael Leja will discuss Jackson Pollock’s political views on Sunday at the Fireplace Project, a gallery space across Springs-Fireplace  Road from the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs.

  •     It is not always clear where or how to look at the installation of Gerson Leiber’s recent drawings, titled “Drawings Drawings Drawings,” on view this summer at the Leiber Museum in Springs. Efforts to do so can be exciting and confounding at the same time.
        Calling it an installation rather than an exhibit is clarifying. The works tend to be around the same size, about 30 by 22 inches on average, and are hung by pushpin, stacked on top of each other and abutting their neighbors to create a kind of unified mural.

  •     It was a sunny and breezy summer afternoon on Aug. 3 as some 100 artists from Springs and its immediate environs pulled small canvases and sculptures out of their cars and trundled them up on the porch and into Ashawagh Hall.

  •     Escape to New York opened its weekend-long festival on Friday at the Shinnecock Indian Reservation in Southampton to scant crowds but a game line-up. By Saturday, as word spread that the Music to Know festival scheduled for this weekend in East Hampton had been canceled because of lax ticket sales, the crowds had grown significantly, and, on Sunday, although the final day of music was canceled due to bad weather, the Escape to New York organizers indicated that they would return next year.

  •     Guild Hall will open “Covering Pollock,” an exhibit by Richard Prince, on Saturday in both galleries.                    

  • A Book Is Not an X
        John MacWhinnie and Glenn Horowitz will present new work by Tauba Auerbach at their East Hampton bookshop and gallery beginning tomorrow. Jeremy Sanders is the curator of the exhibit, “A Book Is Not an X.”

  •     This year’s Hamptons Designer Showhouse to benefit Southampton Hospital seemed to eschew some of the dourness of recent years in exchange for some blithe hopefulness that a rising tide on the South Fork will raise all the boats in the harbor, whatever their size.

  •     Bryan Hunt’s exhibit at Guild Hall is a study in contradictions and the subtleties of form, even when the sculptures top out at 12 feet tall and 600 pounds. The last chance to see the show is this weekend, and it would be a pity to miss the sculptures, which have come into being in his studios in East Hampton and New York City and are regularly shown nationally, but not as frequently here.

Blogs by this author:

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.

  • “White Hot + Blue” was the theme of this year’s LongHouse Reserve’s benefit in East Hampton on Saturday and the grounds and guests were done up just right.

  • Susan and Stanley Reifer will open their Bridgehampton garden on Saturday from 10 am to 3 pm. through the Garden Conservency.

    The garden was designed by Jian Guo Xu, Chinese artist who has incorporate Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism on the garden's five acres. The garden includes pavilions, bridges, and water features accessed by winding paths.

    The garden is at 5 Paumanok Road, Bridgehampton and  admission is $5.

  • The Parrish Art Museum’s sold-out Midsummer Party on Saturday night raised $1.25 million and attracted some 1,000 guests.

    The event honored Inga Maren Otto, a philanthropist, and Katharina Otto-Bernstein, a filmmaker and author.

  • Thursday night was the night to be in Bridgehampton. Long lines of cars snaked through the back roads and front roads around the Bridgehampton Museum and Nova's Ark where two annual art fairs have taken up residence for the next few days.

    It was the opening night for both ArtHamptons and Art Market Hamptons and even those with black cards, VIP passes, or other bells and whistles on their forms of entry had a tough time negotiating parking.

    Inside, however, all was lively and fun, as these photos of the Art Market Hamptons fair by Morgan McGivern demonstrate. 

  • An auction benefiting LongHouse Reserve is open for bidding now at Paddle 8. The sale is being held in conjunction with the East Hampton garden and art center’s annual benefit on July 19.