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Articles by this author:

  •      It was November in Northwest Woods and Walter Weissman’s front lawn was blanketed in crunchy tobacco-colored leaves. The cottage on Atlantic Street, which he shares with Eunice Golden, a painter, gives her the bright and airy studio space she needs and him his own space to work on his photography as well as a basement to work on his sculpture of constructed and deconstructed objects.

  • Frank Wimberley And East End Artists

        Beginning today, Spanierman Modern is showing both new work by Frank Wimberley and “Artists of the East End II,” which highlights works created from the mid-20th century to the present.
        Mr. Wimberley’s paintings are thick impastos of palette-applied, high-keyed colorful acrylic paint. Sometimes monochromatic and sometimes with sections or stripes, they all have a dynamic feel and a rich depth to them.

  • Its glossy, heavy stock and appealing, even sexy, Hollywood set-worthy pictures may have some mistaking the Main Street Historic District Guide for a more commercial endeavor.

  • New Show at Firestone
        Beginning Saturday, the Eric Firestone Gallery in East Hampton will present “Vincent Longo: Selected Works, 1960s and 1970.” Mr. Longo is a painter and printmaker who has been making art for almost six decades.

        The exhibit will include early paintings and works on paper influenced by Wassily Kandinsky and Abstract Expressionism and grid works inspired by Piet Mondrian.

  •     The photographs in the Spanierman catalogue say it all. There she is with Hans Hofmann in his Provincetown, Mass., studio, then with Willem de Kooning in Springs, in a photo shoot with Ad Reinhardt, arm in arm with Lee Krasner, or standing confidently with her hand on her hip on an East Hampton beach with some of the greatest artists of the period in a 1962 Hans Namuth photograph.

  •     Cynthia Daniels has a voice meant for radio. Low in timbre, rich and melodic, it soothes the ears like warm buttered rum. Her radio shows, “MonkMusic Radio” and “On the Air at Crossroads,” showcase East End musicians playing and talking about their music.
        Tomorrow, those musicians will join her and her co-host Bonnie Grice at Guild Hall at a fund-raising event for it and WPPB 88.3FM, the Southampton public radio station that broadcasts her shows.

  • Holiday Show
        The Romany Kramoris Gallery has a holiday exhibit on view that includes the work of Shey Wolvek, Isabel Pavao, Jude Amsel, Christopher Engel, George Wazenegger, Laura Rozenberg, and Maria Orlova. It focuses on small works of art, and there will be special pricing on artists of the week. The show is up through Jan. 8 at the Sag Harbor gallery.

    “Painter of Long Island”

  •     Japan has an early start in commemorating next year’s centennial of Jackson Pollock’s birth. Its Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art in Nagoya has opened an exhibit of some 60 of his works.

  •     Beginning tomorrow at 4 p.m., East Enders will have an opportunity to experience a classic story in a bygone way when Peconic Public Broadcasting at 88.3 FM presents a radio play of “A Christmas Carol,” produced and performed by members of the community.

  •     The Studio Playhouse’s latest production is “Four,” a group of four one-act plays written by Long Island playwrights. It will be performed from next Thursday through Dec. 3 at LTV’s Studio 3 in Wainscott.
        The community group, which was formed earlier this year in collaboration with LTV, performed “Destry Rides Again” in June. This time they have plays by Frank Tangredi, Michelle Murphy, and Hortense Carpentier.

Blogs by this author:

  • "Serial," a podcast that has now been downloaded almost 60 million times, won a Peabody award this week from the University of Georgia. The award, considered the "Pulitzer Prize for broadcasting," was announced on Monday.  It is the first time since the awards started in 1941 that the board of jurors has chosen to give a Peabody to a podcast.

  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.