Author Information

Articles by this author:

  •     Not every artist manages to continue refreshing his work into his 70s, but Keith Sonnier, through the aid of a new studio space in Bridgehampton, has managed to do just that. The evidence is on view at Pace Gallery in Chelsea through Feb. 22.

        The artist chose his most regular medium quite early in his career. Graduating from Rutgers University with an M.F.A. in 1966, it was only two years later that he began working in the neon gas lighting that has defined his sculpture ever since.

  •     Those who saw Jack Ceglic’s work at Ille Arts this summer would have been surprised by the most recent projects in his East Hampton studio last month. Although the familiar revealing and colorful portraits of friends and neighbors were well in evidence, hanging on the walls and most available surfaces were compositions expressed in the blackest of charcoal pastel.

  •     A viewer doesn’t need to know Elizabeth Huey’s complicated relationship with psychology to sense something not quite right in the superficially sunny images on the walls at Harper’s Books in East Hampton.

  • Limited by World War II rationing, two photographers and antiques collectors made Montauk’s vistas their own.
  •     If it was anyone else, it might be considered a garage sale, a large collection of mostly unrelated objects put out on display perhaps because the owner is redecorating or raising money for another purpose.

  •     Now that the holiday season has drawn to a close, those stuck in their house from winter storms and a dislike of cold air may be looking for more serious diversions to lure them from their hibernation. Yet this time of year, the South Fork arts calendar typically contracts, leading to a sense of frustrated purpose.

        Fortunately, a few stout-hearted dealers have kept their venues and shows from last month open for the weeks through Martin Luther King Day, and Tripoli Gallery is one of them.

  • The museum continues to attract major gifts and acquisitions to its new state-of-the-art facility in Water Mill, but the 2,700 works in its holdings are not all created equal.
  •      Gail Levin has organized an exhibition of the work of Theresa Bernstein, now on view at the James Gallery at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

        Ms. Levin, who has a house in Bridgehampton, is distinguished professor of art history at the graduate center and Baruch College. She edited the exhibition catalog, with articles written by her, her students, and other scholars interested in Bernstein’s work.

  •     East Hampton may seem a long way from Michigan but for someone like Jill Lasersohn, who grew up on a farm near Lake Huron, the landscape looks remarkably like home. And like her childhood Christmases, Ms. Lasersohn transforms her house here every year from a summery retreat to a warm and inviting Yuletide setting, with wood crackling in the fireplaces, warm wool throws and lap blankets, crisp bows, and thoughtfully arranged evergreens.

  •     It was another good year in Miami for art dealers from the South Fork, who populated the satellite fairs to Art Basel Miami Beach in strong numbers and had brisk sales in their galleries.

Blogs by this author: