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Articles by this author:

  • The gallerist Larry Gagosian has a long-running lawsuit against him brought by Ronald Perelman, a former friend and client.
  • While some of us were basking in the sun or sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic to get to the next much-hyped event, Enoc Perez was hard at work in his East Hampton studio on the pieces presented in “Summer Job” at Harper’s Books in East Hampton.
        The frothy riff touches on social media, appropriation, modern art, and, if you’re feeling academic in these lazy dog days, Lacanian notions and related theories of the subject and object of the gaze in art.

  • Late summer on the South Fork can sometimes seem like a mostly deflated balloon: paunchy, flaccid, and spent. A sense of scraping bottom often takes hold, and any new endeavor, show, or exhibition is met with suspicion or derision, often borne of the same contagious exhaustion.

  • The Box Art Auction benefit for East End Hospice will present a preview of the cigar box creations of area artists beloved locally and internationally on Wednesday from 5 to 7 p.m. at Hoie Hall of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in East Hampton Village. The boxes will remain on view next Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The auction itself will be held Sept. 6 at the Ross School.

  • New faces from the political world spiced up the annual event.
  • Lauren Bacall, one of the sirens of Hollywood’s golden age and a Tony-award winning actress for her work on Broadway, died Tuesday from what has been reported to be a massive stroke at home in New York.
  • If you can’t get enough Shakespeare and haven’t had enough of Propero so far this summer, “The Tempest” is being offered twice this weekend by the Bay Street Theater, although not at its home base. On Saturday, a free outdoor reading will take place at Mashashimuet Park in Sag Harbor. On Sunday, the actors will meet guests and present another reading of the play on Shelter Island. Both performances start at 7.

  • “Last Days in Vietnam,” the third film in the Hamptons International Film Festival’s SummerDocs series, will be screened on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at Guild Hall.

    This final film from Rory Kennedy, whose intimate biography of her mother in the film “Ethel” was screened in the SummerDocs series two years ago.

    Alec Baldwin will host the event and lead a discussion with Ms. Kennedy and Stuart Herrington, one of the subjects of the film.

  • For more than a half century, a group of writers and artists have met in East Hampton to duke it out for supremacy on a softball diamond. Some of the most vaunted names in American arts and letters have participated, making it an almost sacred ritual in some circles.

  • If a viewer did not know that Alisa Baremboym and Gregory Edwards were newlyweds, it would soon become obvious in seeing their show at the Fireplace Project in Springs. “Contact” is a dialogue between two artists whose lives and vision have become entwined, not literally but with enough feeling to create circuits and sparks throughout the gallery space.

Blogs by this author:

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."