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  •     Tomorrow, Guild Hall will hold its Summer Gala in conjunction with the opening of the Chuck Close exhibition at the museum. A cocktail party at the show will be followed by drinks, dinner, and dancing at the Bridgehampton estate of Louise and Leonard Riggio. A live art auction will also be part of the festivities.
        Tickets begin at $500 for the exhibition preview and cocktails, and $1,200 for the entire evening and can be purchased through Guild Hall’s special events department.

  •    Sometimes it can be hard to tell when a project or company has reached a tipping point. So often things can appear just on the brink of a breakthrough and then fall just short of the last leap.
        This is not the case with Art Intelligence, a relatively recent start-up that takes the best of old school art historical research and marries it to the latest in app technology to create a seamless narrative devoted to some of the more inventive and cross-cultural artists of the past few decades.

  • Hanging Art to Dry
        Guild Hall’s annual Clothesline Art Sale happens on Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The annual event, which dates from 1946, features the work of nearly 400 artists and always attracts mobs of interested browsers and beginning collectors.
        Prices range from $50 to $2,000, with all proceeds split evenly between the artist and Guild Hall. The event is free.

    New at the Fireplace

  • Art Southampton is back in its second edition at the Elks Lodge in a tent that boasts 100,000 running feet of exhibition space.
  • Feeling Jazzy
        The East Hampton Historical Society will hold an opening reception for its new exhibition, “Jazz Age East Hampton (1919-1933): Clothes, Clubs, and Contraband,” from 5 to 7 p.m. tomorrow. It will open to the public on Saturday and be up through Oct. 13.

  • Dorothy Lichtenstein has given the Stony Brook Southampton Graduate Arts programs a $1 million gift at a crucial time in their development, the school announced this week
  •     It wasn’t necessary to go to the jammed opening-night festivities at ArtHamptons and artMRKT Hamptons to grasp that the fairs may have finally “arrived,” despite the continued lack of attention from A-list galleries and dealers.

  •     Although absent from the Main Street scene of Southampton Village for some time, Stephan Keszler is back at the old power plant on North Sea Road, where he presented the street artist Banksy in 2011.
        Back then, the property was extremely raw and reminiscent of the untouched gallery spaces in old warehouses and facilities in Manhattan’s West Chelsea. It has been cleaned up a lot as the new Keszler Annex, but the interior retains the industrial feel that made it an ideal backdrop for the gritty and controversial wall pieces of Banksy.

  • Two New on View
    At Halsey Mckay
        Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton is showing “Mornings, Sentimental, Wonder & Acoustic Shadows,” works by Patrick Brennan, and “Two Wholes” by Brie Ruais through July 31.

  • A Guild Hall exhibition is a snapshot of what has occupied the self-effacing artist most recently. Almost all of the paintings were completed in 2012 and 2013, some practically drying on the walls.

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  •      Elizabeth Dow, whose wall coverings and fabrics have been installed in the White House and in the private homes of Paul Simon, Harrison Ford, and Bill Gates to name a few, actually got her start as a painter and she continues in that medium to this day. Many of her recent works went on view at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday in a show called "Heaven" and will stay there until May 19.

  •      LongHouse Reserve offered a preview to both a sale of textiles from the collection of Jack Lenor Larsen and to what patrons will see on Saturday when the gardens open to the public for the season.

  •      If you look up Sammy’s Beach on the Internet, you are given maps, a lot of real estate listings, and a few photographs of a bay beach, typically with a lot of tire ruts. On Instagram it’s different, more arty shots of wind blown waves on a rocky shore, abstract amalgamations of jingle shells and seaweed, dramatic sunsets, and the like.

  •      The Spring Fling at the Parrish Art Museum may have been causing delays on the highway in front of its Water Mill headquarters, but over in East Hampton several gallery exhibitions opening on Saturday night, kept many residents close to home.

  •      If you think the tabs on pop top cans are mundane subject matter,  Alice Hope will likely change your mind with a show at  the Ricco Maresca Gallery in Chelsea. There, viewers will find a range of tab-inspired artworks that either incorporate the small metal pieces of  flotsam, elevate the form to sizable hanging sculpture, or come up with other interpretations wholly unique to the artist.

  •      Shigeru Ban, an architect known for both high-end and humanitarian projects using environmentally sensitive and recycled materials, has won this year's Pritzker Architecture Prize it was announced Monday.

  •      I had not planned on going to the Art Dealers Association of America show at the Park Avenue Armory so late. Initially, it was on my schedule for Thursday as my first drop in of the weekend, but I got in later than I thought, other plans arose, and the next thing I knew it was Sunday and it was quiet.

  •      Despite a reported increase in "fair fatigue" among dealers and collectors and a warm sunny day outside, the Armory Show packed the piers on Saturday with long lines to get in and crowded aisles and booths all afternoon. There were 205 exhibitors spread among two piers with 146 in the contemporary section and 59 in the modern section.
         While few dealers in the contemporary section featured East End artists, the modern selection had a good representation, both past and present.

  •      Seeming oddly out of the way in Soho, once the nexus of the contemporary art world, Volta NY offered a mostly focused presentation at its annual satellite fair during Armory art week in New York City.
         It was also the only fair in the city this week that attracted South Fork dealers: Halsey Mckay Gallery from East Hampton and Sara Nightingale Gallery from Water Mill. The fair was invitational and restricted to solo shows. 

  •      The Bruce High Quality Foundation's final Brucennial, a biannual event timed to the Whitney Museum of American Art's Biennial exhibition, is devoted only to women, this year in its final iteration. 
         Although there were rumors that some men submitted under female names, there was enough sheer quantity to earn the anonymous group a record for the largest female exhibition.