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  • A Book Is Not an X
        John MacWhinnie and Glenn Horowitz will present new work by Tauba Auerbach at their East Hampton bookshop and gallery beginning tomorrow. Jeremy Sanders is the curator of the exhibit, “A Book Is Not an X.”

  •     This year’s Hamptons Designer Showhouse to benefit Southampton Hospital seemed to eschew some of the dourness of recent years in exchange for some blithe hopefulness that a rising tide on the South Fork will raise all the boats in the harbor, whatever their size.

  •     Bryan Hunt’s exhibit at Guild Hall is a study in contradictions and the subtleties of form, even when the sculptures top out at 12 feet tall and 600 pounds. The last chance to see the show is this weekend, and it would be a pity to miss the sculptures, which have come into being in his studios in East Hampton and New York City and are regularly shown nationally, but not as frequently here.

  • Kuntz in London
        Doug Kuntz, a photographer whose work has appeared many times in The Star, has photos on view in London through Oct. 2 in an exhibit called “H2O.”
        Mr. Kuntz’s images will be included with that of Ekkehard Altenburger, Crispin Chetwynd, Keith Collins, Richard Elliott, Stephen Farthing, David Ferry, Derek Jarman, Robin Jenkins, Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands, Shoko Maeda, Oborn & Reekie, Tim O’Riley, Emily Rubner, and Donald Smith.

  •     The 2011 Great Chefs Dinner to benefit Hayground School, now in its seventh year, will be held on Sunday with its usual roster of marquee chefs from near and far — plus the designer and television personality Isaac Mizrahi, who joins as a surprise guest cook.
        This year, the art auction that accompanies the culinary action is drawing as much buzz as the tastings and wine pairings.

  • For those paying attention, this summer will bring not one, but two new rock festivals to the South Fork.
  • By the end of 2009, it seemed all print media companies were on the verge of collapse. Bankruptcies and layoffs were the common headlines generated by activities happening in the very newsrooms reporting them
  •     Anyone who happened to be going through Bridgehampton recently may have noticed a bit of hoopla and some giant tents taking up prominent landscape — those of ArtHamptons two weeks ago and ArtMRKT Hamptons last weekend.

  • Studio Tour Weekend   
    The Artists Alliance of East Hampton will hold its 26th annual studio tour Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. South Fork artists from Ted Asnis to Athos Zacharias and 30 more in between will participate. A preview exhibit, allowing “tourists” to check the work of artists whose studios they may want to visit, will be held at Ashawagh Hall in Springs tomorrow from 5 to 8 p.m.

  • The Hamptons Institute will return to Guild Hall in its second iteration beginning tomorrow with “The Producers,” a panel discussion focused on the changing and differing roles of theater producers in the high-stakes real estate of Broadway.

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  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."