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  •     Speaking to Lola Montes Schnabel is like taking a crash refresher course in art history. Within a five-minute span of conversation the young artist, whose mentors include the legendary art historian Leo Steinberg, might mention Alex Katz in one sentence, allude to Giorgio di Chirico’s use of paint in another, and bring up a pilgrimage to Malta to see a Caravaggio masterpiece in a Baroque cathedral.

  • Vered Stitches Time
        The Vered Gallery in East Hampton will show “A Stitch in Jewish Time” beginning Saturday with an opening at 9 p.m. The exhibit brings together a group of 20 contemporary artists, each of whom uses textiles “to address the issues of memory and reflection, interpretations of history and ritual, and links between the past and present relating to the Jewish experience.”

  •     A three-day preview of the East End Hospice’s annual Box Art Auction will begin on Wednesday, with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in East Hampton.
    Some 75 East End artists are participating, each of whom will decorate a box — often a cigar box — for the event. The boxes will be auctioned on Sept. 10 at the Ross School in East Hampton, to benefit the hospice. The evening includes wine and hors d’oeuvres for an admission fee of $60.

  •     Guild Hall’s Red Carpet Film Series is welcoming one of its own next Thursday with the presentation of the film “The Art of Getting By” by Gavin Wiesen. Not only was the script written in East Hampton, but the writer and director also chose the films for the 2008 to 2010 summer series.
         If the title sounds familiar, it is because the film had a limited release in June, garnering positive reviews. It was also a selection of this year’s Sundance Festival, although under another title, “Homework.”

  •     An unlikely hero, Josh Grisetti has a face like a question mark. His raised eyebrows and nose are the curve and his often agape mouth forms the dot at its base. As the protagonist of “Enter Laughing,” he can mold that face like putty, looking doltish or debonair in the span of a second.

  •     The Parrish Art Museum will open “Artists Choose Artists,” its second juried exhibit, to the public on Sunday. The show will feature groupings of one “jury” artist who was selected by the museum to choose two other artists who seemed to share affinities or stylistic similarities. The exhibit will include displays of one of the juror’s works along side those artists chosen by the juror.

  • Pollock’s Politics
        Michael Leja will discuss Jackson Pollock’s political views on Sunday at the Fireplace Project, a gallery space across Springs-Fireplace  Road from the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs.

  •     It is not always clear where or how to look at the installation of Gerson Leiber’s recent drawings, titled “Drawings Drawings Drawings,” on view this summer at the Leiber Museum in Springs. Efforts to do so can be exciting and confounding at the same time.
        Calling it an installation rather than an exhibit is clarifying. The works tend to be around the same size, about 30 by 22 inches on average, and are hung by pushpin, stacked on top of each other and abutting their neighbors to create a kind of unified mural.

  •     It was a sunny and breezy summer afternoon on Aug. 3 as some 100 artists from Springs and its immediate environs pulled small canvases and sculptures out of their cars and trundled them up on the porch and into Ashawagh Hall.

  •     Escape to New York opened its weekend-long festival on Friday at the Shinnecock Indian Reservation in Southampton to scant crowds but a game line-up. By Saturday, as word spread that the Music to Know festival scheduled for this weekend in East Hampton had been canceled because of lax ticket sales, the crowds had grown significantly, and, on Sunday, although the final day of music was canceled due to bad weather, the Escape to New York organizers indicated that they would return next year.

Blogs by this author:

  • "Serial," a podcast that has now been downloaded almost 60 million times, won a Peabody award this week from the University of Georgia. The award, considered the "Pulitzer Prize for broadcasting," was announced on Monday.  It is the first time since the awards started in 1941 that the board of jurors has chosen to give a Peabody to a podcast.

    The jurors called "Serial" an "audio game-changer" and "the first unquestionably mainstream podcast."

  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.