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  •     Guild Hall will open “Covering Pollock,” an exhibit by Richard Prince, on Saturday in both galleries.                    

  • A Book Is Not an X
        John MacWhinnie and Glenn Horowitz will present new work by Tauba Auerbach at their East Hampton bookshop and gallery beginning tomorrow. Jeremy Sanders is the curator of the exhibit, “A Book Is Not an X.”

  •     This year’s Hamptons Designer Showhouse to benefit Southampton Hospital seemed to eschew some of the dourness of recent years in exchange for some blithe hopefulness that a rising tide on the South Fork will raise all the boats in the harbor, whatever their size.

  •     Bryan Hunt’s exhibit at Guild Hall is a study in contradictions and the subtleties of form, even when the sculptures top out at 12 feet tall and 600 pounds. The last chance to see the show is this weekend, and it would be a pity to miss the sculptures, which have come into being in his studios in East Hampton and New York City and are regularly shown nationally, but not as frequently here.

  • Kuntz in London
        Doug Kuntz, a photographer whose work has appeared many times in The Star, has photos on view in London through Oct. 2 in an exhibit called “H2O.”
        Mr. Kuntz’s images will be included with that of Ekkehard Altenburger, Crispin Chetwynd, Keith Collins, Richard Elliott, Stephen Farthing, David Ferry, Derek Jarman, Robin Jenkins, Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands, Shoko Maeda, Oborn & Reekie, Tim O’Riley, Emily Rubner, and Donald Smith.

  •     The 2011 Great Chefs Dinner to benefit Hayground School, now in its seventh year, will be held on Sunday with its usual roster of marquee chefs from near and far — plus the designer and television personality Isaac Mizrahi, who joins as a surprise guest cook.
        This year, the art auction that accompanies the culinary action is drawing as much buzz as the tastings and wine pairings.

  • For those paying attention, this summer will bring not one, but two new rock festivals to the South Fork.
  • By the end of 2009, it seemed all print media companies were on the verge of collapse. Bankruptcies and layoffs were the common headlines generated by activities happening in the very newsrooms reporting them
  •     Anyone who happened to be going through Bridgehampton recently may have noticed a bit of hoopla and some giant tents taking up prominent landscape — those of ArtHamptons two weeks ago and ArtMRKT Hamptons last weekend.

  • Studio Tour Weekend   
    The Artists Alliance of East Hampton will hold its 26th annual studio tour Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. South Fork artists from Ted Asnis to Athos Zacharias and 30 more in between will participate. A preview exhibit, allowing “tourists” to check the work of artists whose studios they may want to visit, will be held at Ashawagh Hall in Springs tomorrow from 5 to 8 p.m.

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  • A small, but excellently edited collection of Michael Halsband portraits are on display at the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park through April 25.

    Included in the mix that goes back to the mid 1980s are selections from Rolling Stones tours, images of artists and other musicians of the time, his nudes series, contemporary surfers and their culture across a few continents, and some recent formal portraits.

  • Art Groove opened Saturday night at Ashawagh Hall with 13 artists and the band Out East providing fusion rock and a dance party following with DJ G-Funk.

    The art was a mixture of color and movement with more restrained or slightly twisted offerings.

    The show is on view Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a screening of “Hans Van de Bovenkamp: In His Own Words,”  a documentary by John Jinks, who is also one of the artists in the show.

  • Laurie Anderson will serve as curator for the “Live Ideas” festival of New York Live Arts beginning Wednesday.

    Working with Bill T. Jones, the artistic director of New York Live Arts, they have developed a program of musical performances, lectures, dance works, panels, film screenings, and other events over a five-day period ending on Sunday.

  • On an otherwise quiet holiday weekend, the Watermill Center attracted crowds looking for something artful to do on Saturday afternoon.

    After a late morning puppet workshop with Julian Crouch and Saskia Lane that transformed ordinary objects into beautiful storytelling props, Kembra Pfahler led a rapt group in techniques taken from her East Village performance art school. Stream-of-consciousness writing and meditative activities were just some of the exercises in the session.

    In the early evening, a reception was held for a site-specific sculpture made by Daniel Arsham.

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.