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  • New Shows at Halsey Mckay

    Halsey Mckay has opened two new shows at its East Hampton gallery space. One, “Inversion Spectrum,” is a solo show of works by Corey Escoto, who uses both analog and digital processes in photography to tease the viewer into figuring out which is which, where the origin of each image lies, and how photography has adapted to contain all of the available technology.

  • Although Lee Krasner spent much of her life in Springs, it would be a mistake to neglect the contribution of Norman Lewis to “From the Margins: Lee Krasner | Norman Lewis, 1945-1952,” now at the Jewish Museum in Manhattan. The exhibition so enmeshes their work that it is difficult to divide one from the other.

    Krasner, born in Brooklyn to Russian emigres, moved here in 1945 with her husband, Jackson Pollock, and helped form the colony of artists working here who would define midcentury Modern art.

  • When first confronted with the hodgepodge of artist names from the South Fork’s past and present on view at Peter Marcelle Project in Southampton, one cannot be faulted for assuming the exhibition might be a bit of a visual mess.

  • Those who think they are starting to see Colin Goldberg everywhere are probably right. Work by the recent Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant recipient is currently on view at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton and at the Southampton Cultural Center, and he was part of a group show at the Southampton Arts Center this summer.

  • The simple yet elegant presentation of works by Hiroshi Sugimoto at the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton begins at the entrance to the gallery. Like the restrained, masterly crafted boxes he makes for his glass sculptures, the gallery has been turned into discreet packaging for the jewels within its walls.

  • It is difficult to believe that we observe the centennial of Saul Steinberg’s birth this year. Born at the very start of World War I, he is an artist who has transcended his era in quieter and yet more influential ways than many of his peers whose centenaries we have also recently marked.

  • As the skies began to darken last week on the eve of the first heavy rain in months, Susan Wood was concerned.

  • The minimal world of Mary Ellen Bartley has been in evidence in group and solo shows around the country and closer to home at the Drawing Room in East Hampton and the Parrish Art Museum, but her first New York City solo exhibition featuring her “Paperbacks” series at Yancey Richardson Gallery is something of an event.

  • The Museum of Modern Art will present a survey of Robert Gober’s career, spanning four decades, beginning on Saturday.

    The artist, who has had a house in Peconic since 1990, is known for his enigmatic sculptures of everyday objects with a twist, large installations, and drawings and prints. The work is often minimal but charged with narrative and allusions to religion, politics, and sexuality.

  • Walking into Guild Hall in East Hampton these days is like walking into a Sistine Chapel composed of text. Barbara Kruger’s installation has so thoroughly transformed the architecture of the Moran Gallery that walls fade away and ceilings are obliterated with colossal sans serif white type against a glossy black background.

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