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  •       The “Willem de Kooning: Ten Paintings, 1983-1985” exhibition at the Gagosian gallery on Madison Avenue is grand in scale and vision. An expertly chosen sampling of the best works of the artist’s late period, the paintings sing together in a room that, while full of white space, seems barely able to contain them.

  •     At sea, it would be called a squall — gusty winds and torrential rain in a sudden onslaught on West 23rd Street that disappeared as quickly as it came — and Michael Light arrived recently at the Danziger Gallery in midst of it, poised but slightly dazed. It was an appropriately dramatic entrance for someone who describes his process of art making as “hurling myself into the landscape.” On that November morning, the cityscape was hurling something back at him.

  •     The walls are spare, painted black even, and the room would look like a tomb if the afternoon sun weren’t beaming in just so. It is what makes the show by Peter Sabbeth and Ross Watts at Sara Nightingale poetic and touching — trenchant, really, and not easy to forget.

  •        An artistic love child of Jackson Pollock and his mistress Ruth Kligman has garnered new legitimacy through the kind of police crime-lab science popularized in “CSI”-type television shows.

  •     Quite a long time ago and in a much different context, Ronald Reagan said “A tree’s a tree. How many more do you have to look at?” That observation may be misguided in a nature-loving sense, but it is also flawed in an artistic one.

  • A forensics investigator said "beyond reasonable doubt" that a painting Ruth Kligman claimed for years was Jackson Pollock's final work before his fatal car crash in 1956 was painted at the artist's house in Springs.
  •     With a fully reserved first performance of the “Water’s Edge Radio Hour” at Wolffer Estate Winery on Saturday, clearly an audience exists for a home-grown version of “A Prairie Home Companion,” the popular public radio staple.

  •     Marking the one-year anniversary of its Water Mill location, the Parrish Art Museum will have a weekend celebration for the community on Saturday and Sunday. Since last November, the museum has hosted 65,000 visitors and wants to encourage more through its temporary exhibitions, periodic reinstallations of the permanent collection, and regular concerts and special events.

  •     Guild Hall will open two exhibitions this week to inaugurate the museum’s fall season, each lively and provocative in its own way. In one gallery, Thomas Moran’s stylistic legacy and his preoccupation with European art movements will be examined in “Tracing Moran’s Romanticism and Symbolism.” In the other, Christa Maiwald will offer “Short Stories and Other Embroideries.” Ms. Maiwald was the winner of the 2011 members exhibition.

  •     It is funny, but I had to be reminded this week that Robert Dash wasn’t an abstract artist, not in the nonobjective sense anyway. The inveterate gardener, writer, and artist left us last month after a long illness, but his legacy in Madoo, his residence and conservancy, and his artwork, as well as a quite lengthy catalogue of columns he wrote for The Star over many years, will continue.

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