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  • ArtHamptons and artMRKT opened on Thursday night to crowds happy to take in the art in the various gallery booths and other related performances and activities.
  •     Mid-July has become art fair season on the South Fork, with three fairs running in rapid succession, two this weekend in Bridgehampton and another beginning July 25 in Southampton.
        Both ArtHamptons and artMRKT Hamptons will open their doors tonight with previews and cocktail parties for their own exhibitors, sponsors, media partners, honorees, events, and beneficiaries.

  • More Aycock, Now
    In East Hampton

        The “Alice Aycock: New Works on Paper” exhibition will open on Saturday at the Drawing Room in East Hampton.
        Ms. Aycock came of age as an artist between the Modernist and Post-Modernist eras in the 1970s. She is known for her large-scale installations, public art projects, and outdoor sculptures. As the gallery notes, she is a conceptualist at heart and her drawings are driven by language, memory, fiction, and scientific and philosophical extremes.

  • “DNA & Dust”
        QF Gallery in East Hampton will present “DNA & Dust,” work by Heather Dewey-Hagborg and Paul Hazelton, beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • Essentially a retrospective in paper and maquettes, a major show of work by Alice Aycock is on view at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill and New York City though July 13.
  • Anne Chaisson has been director of the Hamptons International Film Festival since November, but she has been associated with the organization for more than a decade.
  • Art Weekend
        ArtWalk Hamptons will sponsor numerous art openings and events this weekend with proceeds at some participating galleries to benefit the Retreat. Certain galleries in East Hampton, Amagansett, Sag Harbor, Montauk, Bridgehampton, and Southampton will be open until 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and until 6 p.m. on Sunday.
        There will be talks, tours, and performances in addition to planned receptions. Complete details are available at artwalkhamptons.com.

    Yachts to Look At

  •    There is a lot of black and white in the paintings of Nicolas Carone, particularly in the works he painted in New York City. But in his East Hampton paintings from the 1950s, on view at the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs, he worked mainly in color.

  • Mannix at Hampton Hang
        In a new show opening tomorrow, Karyn Mannix is looking beyond the beloved South Fork medium of painting to find other artistic inspiration that falls outside that two-dimensional form.
        At Karyn Mannix at Hampton Hang, her summer exhibition space in Water Mill behind Suki Zuki, she has brought together four artists: Maria Bacardi, Charles McGill, Gabriele T. Raacke, and Claire Watson, who use unusual mediums to approach art from a more conceptual viewpoint.

  •     After a sojourn in Southampton last year, the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons’ garden tour, now in its 27th year, returns to East Hampton on June 15. The tour features six private gardens, complimentary admission to the Much Ado About Madoo garden market sale in Sagaponack, and a separate cocktail reception.
        Highlights include the gardens of two landscape designers, Craig James Socia’s Craigmoor property on Accabonac Road and that of Michael Derrig and his wife, Dwyer, on Buell Lane Extension.

Blogs by this author:

  •      Elizabeth Dow, whose wall coverings and fabrics have been installed in the White House and in the private homes of Paul Simon, Harrison Ford, and Bill Gates to name a few, actually got her start as a painter and she continues in that medium to this day. Many of her recent works went on view at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday in a show called "Heaven" and will stay there until May 19.

  •      LongHouse Reserve offered a preview to both a sale of textiles from the collection of Jack Lenor Larsen and to what patrons will see on Saturday when the gardens open to the public for the season.

  •      If you look up Sammy’s Beach on the Internet, you are given maps, a lot of real estate listings, and a few photographs of a bay beach, typically with a lot of tire ruts. On Instagram it’s different, more arty shots of wind blown waves on a rocky shore, abstract amalgamations of jingle shells and seaweed, dramatic sunsets, and the like.

  •      The Spring Fling at the Parrish Art Museum may have been causing delays on the highway in front of its Water Mill headquarters, but over in East Hampton several gallery exhibitions opening on Saturday night, kept many residents close to home.

  •      If you think the tabs on pop top cans are mundane subject matter,  Alice Hope will likely change your mind with a show at  the Ricco Maresca Gallery in Chelsea. There, viewers will find a range of tab-inspired artworks that either incorporate the small metal pieces of  flotsam, elevate the form to sizable hanging sculpture, or come up with other interpretations wholly unique to the artist.

  •      Shigeru Ban, an architect known for both high-end and humanitarian projects using environmentally sensitive and recycled materials, has won this year's Pritzker Architecture Prize it was announced Monday.

  •      I had not planned on going to the Art Dealers Association of America show at the Park Avenue Armory so late. Initially, it was on my schedule for Thursday as my first drop in of the weekend, but I got in later than I thought, other plans arose, and the next thing I knew it was Sunday and it was quiet.

  •      Despite a reported increase in "fair fatigue" among dealers and collectors and a warm sunny day outside, the Armory Show packed the piers on Saturday with long lines to get in and crowded aisles and booths all afternoon. There were 205 exhibitors spread among two piers with 146 in the contemporary section and 59 in the modern section.
         While few dealers in the contemporary section featured East End artists, the modern selection had a good representation, both past and present.

  •      Seeming oddly out of the way in Soho, once the nexus of the contemporary art world, Volta NY offered a mostly focused presentation at its annual satellite fair during Armory art week in New York City.
         It was also the only fair in the city this week that attracted South Fork dealers: Halsey Mckay Gallery from East Hampton and Sara Nightingale Gallery from Water Mill. The fair was invitational and restricted to solo shows. 

  •      The Bruce High Quality Foundation's final Brucennial, a biannual event timed to the Whitney Museum of American Art's Biennial exhibition, is devoted only to women, this year in its final iteration. 
         Although there were rumors that some men submitted under female names, there was enough sheer quantity to earn the anonymous group a record for the largest female exhibition.