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  • Every year there are at least one or two books that seek to capitalize on the “Hamptons style” whether it be food, art, architecture, environs, lifestyle, or decor. They can often be expensive and hollow affairs, produced chiefly for last-minute purchases at BookHampton for a host or hostess gift.

  • It is difficult to believe that we observe the centennial of Saul Steinberg’s birth this year. Born at the very start of World War I, he is an artist who has transcended his era in quieter and yet more influential ways than many of his peers whose centenaries we have also recently marked.

  • This past year, some of recent history’s more creative and flamboyant spirits have discovered and interacted with an eccentric and eclectic monument to the artistic pursuits of one of their own. That the artist was Barney Rosset, known primarily for his championing of literature and film, surprised most. But the artifact he created stunned all.

    What they saw was a 12-by-22-foot wall-spanning mural, as ambitious as it is idiosyncratic, and a true emblem of the 20th century, even though it was conceived during the 21st.

  • When Tracey Jackson and Paul Williams first met in the 1980s, the last thing either of them thought was that they might join up to address addictive behavior in a self-help recovery book.

  • It could not have been easy to be an American artist at the turn of the 20th century and the years to follow.

    Playing catch-up with the revolutionary movements of European modern art must have been discouraging at the very least to the young artists who tried. Those who did may have been dismissed by unsympathetic audiences or shunned entirely by fellow artists for not pursuing a more nativist vision.

  • If the precisely formed collage works of Glenn Fischer feel familiar, it is because they have visited the South Fork before, in group shows at the Sara Nightingale Gallery in Water Mill and at the Kathryn Markel Gallery in Bridgehampton. The Bronx-based artist is now flying solo at Nightingale, captivating passers-by looking in from the street and viewers within the gallery.

  • Sabina Streeter’s studio sits on Madison Street in Sag Harbor just across from Il Cappucino. It is a good perch to witness the mid-August street scene that was passing by during a recent interview, as well as the village’s ever-changing landscape over the 15 or so years she has lived and worked there.

  • The gallerist Larry Gagosian has a long-running lawsuit against him brought by Ronald Perelman, a former friend and client.
  • While some of us were basking in the sun or sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic to get to the next much-hyped event, Enoc Perez was hard at work in his East Hampton studio on the pieces presented in “Summer Job” at Harper’s Books in East Hampton.
        The frothy riff touches on social media, appropriation, modern art, and, if you’re feeling academic in these lazy dog days, Lacanian notions and related theories of the subject and object of the gaze in art.

  • Late summer on the South Fork can sometimes seem like a mostly deflated balloon: paunchy, flaccid, and spent. A sense of scraping bottom often takes hold, and any new endeavor, show, or exhibition is met with suspicion or derision, often borne of the same contagious exhaustion.

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