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  • The museum continues to attract major gifts and acquisitions to its new state-of-the-art facility in Water Mill, but the 2,700 works in its holdings are not all created equal.
  •      Gail Levin has organized an exhibition of the work of Theresa Bernstein, now on view at the James Gallery at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

        Ms. Levin, who has a house in Bridgehampton, is distinguished professor of art history at the graduate center and Baruch College. She edited the exhibition catalog, with articles written by her, her students, and other scholars interested in Bernstein’s work.

  •     East Hampton may seem a long way from Michigan but for someone like Jill Lasersohn, who grew up on a farm near Lake Huron, the landscape looks remarkably like home. And like her childhood Christmases, Ms. Lasersohn transforms her house here every year from a summery retreat to a warm and inviting Yuletide setting, with wood crackling in the fireplaces, warm wool throws and lap blankets, crisp bows, and thoughtfully arranged evergreens.

  •     It was another good year in Miami for art dealers from the South Fork, who populated the satellite fairs to Art Basel Miami Beach in strong numbers and had brisk sales in their galleries.

  •       While many Americans had some memory of or reaction to the recent 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Christina Haag had a more personal investment than most in the tributes and recreations of the events that day.

           Only a child herself at the time, she would come to know, befriend, and then fall in love with the president’s only son, John F. Kennedy Jr., a story she recounted as part of her memoir, “Come to the Edge: A Love Story,” published by Spiegel and Grau in 2011.

  •       The “Willem de Kooning: Ten Paintings, 1983-1985” exhibition at the Gagosian gallery on Madison Avenue is grand in scale and vision. An expertly chosen sampling of the best works of the artist’s late period, the paintings sing together in a room that, while full of white space, seems barely able to contain them.

  •     At sea, it would be called a squall — gusty winds and torrential rain in a sudden onslaught on West 23rd Street that disappeared as quickly as it came — and Michael Light arrived recently at the Danziger Gallery in midst of it, poised but slightly dazed. It was an appropriately dramatic entrance for someone who describes his process of art making as “hurling myself into the landscape.” On that November morning, the cityscape was hurling something back at him.

  •     The walls are spare, painted black even, and the room would look like a tomb if the afternoon sun weren’t beaming in just so. It is what makes the show by Peter Sabbeth and Ross Watts at Sara Nightingale poetic and touching — trenchant, really, and not easy to forget.

  •        An artistic love child of Jackson Pollock and his mistress Ruth Kligman has garnered new legitimacy through the kind of police crime-lab science popularized in “CSI”-type television shows.

  •     Quite a long time ago and in a much different context, Ronald Reagan said “A tree’s a tree. How many more do you have to look at?” That observation may be misguided in a nature-loving sense, but it is also flawed in an artistic one.

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