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  • As the skies began to darken last week on the eve of the first heavy rain in months, Susan Wood was concerned.

  • The minimal world of Mary Ellen Bartley has been in evidence in group and solo shows around the country and closer to home at the Drawing Room in East Hampton and the Parrish Art Museum, but her first New York City solo exhibition featuring her “Paperbacks” series at Yancey Richardson Gallery is something of an event.

  • The Museum of Modern Art will present a survey of Robert Gober’s career, spanning four decades, beginning on Saturday.

    The artist, who has had a house in Peconic since 1990, is known for his enigmatic sculptures of everyday objects with a twist, large installations, and drawings and prints. The work is often minimal but charged with narrative and allusions to religion, politics, and sexuality.

  • Walking into Guild Hall in East Hampton these days is like walking into a Sistine Chapel composed of text. Barbara Kruger’s installation has so thoroughly transformed the architecture of the Moran Gallery that walls fade away and ceilings are obliterated with colossal sans serif white type against a glossy black background.

  • Every year there are at least one or two books that seek to capitalize on the “Hamptons style” whether it be food, art, architecture, environs, lifestyle, or decor. They can often be expensive and hollow affairs, produced chiefly for last-minute purchases at BookHampton for a host or hostess gift.

  • It is difficult to believe that we observe the centennial of Saul Steinberg’s birth this year. Born at the very start of World War I, he is an artist who has transcended his era in quieter and yet more influential ways than many of his peers whose centenaries we have also recently marked.

  • This past year, some of recent history’s more creative and flamboyant spirits have discovered and interacted with an eccentric and eclectic monument to the artistic pursuits of one of their own. That the artist was Barney Rosset, known primarily for his championing of literature and film, surprised most. But the artifact he created stunned all.

    What they saw was a 12-by-22-foot wall-spanning mural, as ambitious as it is idiosyncratic, and a true emblem of the 20th century, even though it was conceived during the 21st.

  • When Tracey Jackson and Paul Williams first met in the 1980s, the last thing either of them thought was that they might join up to address addictive behavior in a self-help recovery book.

  • It could not have been easy to be an American artist at the turn of the 20th century and the years to follow.

    Playing catch-up with the revolutionary movements of European modern art must have been discouraging at the very least to the young artists who tried. Those who did may have been dismissed by unsympathetic audiences or shunned entirely by fellow artists for not pursuing a more nativist vision.

  • If the precisely formed collage works of Glenn Fischer feel familiar, it is because they have visited the South Fork before, in group shows at the Sara Nightingale Gallery in Water Mill and at the Kathryn Markel Gallery in Bridgehampton. The Bronx-based artist is now flying solo at Nightingale, captivating passers-by looking in from the street and viewers within the gallery.

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