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  •     Anthropologists and archaeologists often say that much can be learned about a culture by its trash. That may be less true today with recycling, or perhaps even more so.

  •     Hopes and excitement ran high this year for the Guild Hall artist-members show, an annual event that brings the South Fork artistic community together for one of the largest shows in the region. More than 470 artists, the most ever, submitted work to be placed on the walls of the three main galleries, everyone hoping to be recognized by Robert Storr, a former curator at the Museum of Modern Art and the dean of the Yale School of Art.

  • Melville Straus, a longtime champion of Guild Hall as its chairman and a distinguished and successful businessman, died after a long illness with brain cancer on Thursday in New York City.
  • Christina Strassfield discusses what it is like to install more than 400 unrelated art works in Guild Hall's main galleries in just a few days time.
  •     The Hamptons International Film Festival is known primarily for its annual four-day showcase event held in October. Yet for many years, the festival has spread out its calendar to include summer screenings of documentaries and narrative films, projects in the local schools, and a springtime screenwriters lab. The latter brings established professionals to East Hampton to work with writers early in their careers and bring scripts to fruition, with four in recent years making it to production and, in some cases, winning awards.

  •     The paintings of Matt Vega, on view at Ille Arts in Amagansett, mark a bit of a homecoming for the artist, who received an M.F.A. from Yale in photography, but began his studies in painting at Boston University.

  •     If you look up Sammy’s Beach on the Internet, you are given maps, a lot of real estate listings, and a few photographs of a bay beach, typically with a lot of tire ruts. On Instagram it’s different: arty shots of windblown waves on a rocky shore, abstract amalgamations of jingle shells and seaweed, dramatic sunsets and the like.

  • New at Dodds and Eder
        Dodds and Eder Home in Sag Harbor, now under new ownership and focused on the work of local artists, is presenting “Memories of Place: Land/Water/Sky,” now through May 10.

        Participating artists are Maria Schon, an abstract painter from Sagaponack; James DeMartis, an East Hampton-based sculptor and metalworker; Casey Dalene, from East Hampton, who creates designs on textiles and fabrics, and John Cino, a wood sculptor from Patchogue.

  •     Ross Bleckner has lived and worked part time on the Sagaponack property that was once Truman Capote’s writer’s retreat since 1990 and has been showing regularly since the 1970s. Yet, it has been four years since his last solo show in New York City at Mary Boone, his gallery for almost four decades.

  •     The exhibition of John Chamberlain’s metal paintings from the mid-1960s at the Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton has not exactly set the world on fire, but it is the kind of focused, well-considered presentation complementing the Flavin installation upstairs that the Dia Art Foundation, which owns the institute, turns out annually.

Blogs by this author:

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.