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  • A forensics investigator said "beyond reasonable doubt" that a painting Ruth Kligman claimed for years was Jackson Pollock's final work before his fatal car crash in 1956 was painted at the artist's house in Springs.
  •     With a fully reserved first performance of the “Water’s Edge Radio Hour” at Wolffer Estate Winery on Saturday, clearly an audience exists for a home-grown version of “A Prairie Home Companion,” the popular public radio staple.

  •     Marking the one-year anniversary of its Water Mill location, the Parrish Art Museum will have a weekend celebration for the community on Saturday and Sunday. Since last November, the museum has hosted 65,000 visitors and wants to encourage more through its temporary exhibitions, periodic reinstallations of the permanent collection, and regular concerts and special events.

  •     Guild Hall will open two exhibitions this week to inaugurate the museum’s fall season, each lively and provocative in its own way. In one gallery, Thomas Moran’s stylistic legacy and his preoccupation with European art movements will be examined in “Tracing Moran’s Romanticism and Symbolism.” In the other, Christa Maiwald will offer “Short Stories and Other Embroideries.” Ms. Maiwald was the winner of the 2011 members exhibition.

  •     It is funny, but I had to be reminded this week that Robert Dash wasn’t an abstract artist, not in the nonobjective sense anyway. The inveterate gardener, writer, and artist left us last month after a long illness, but his legacy in Madoo, his residence and conservancy, and his artwork, as well as a quite lengthy catalogue of columns he wrote for The Star over many years, will continue.

  •     She didn’t go to drama school, but Helen Bonham Carter did attend ape school — and singing school for that matter — she revealed during an extended discussion at Bay Street Theatre on Saturday.

  •     For someone who was a great proponent of automatic painting and then the kind of expressive abstract aesthetic that allowed American painters to break free of European Modernist precedent, Robert Motherwell never appeared to me to realize fully his own intentions. In fact, it was other artists from that period — Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, and Willem de Kooning in particular — who seemed more willing to take them to their farthest extremes.

  •    There is something about the fall season here that can be melancholy and a bit menacing. The sea takes on a gray cast and the wind and waves whip up out of nowhere. After a summer of crowds, nonstop noise and hubbub, one gray day you wake up, drive to work, and realize that even the main roads are empty and silent and you are finally alone.

  • The Moby Project, a multimedia exhibition and happening, opened Friday at Mulford Farm in East Hampton and in conjunction with “Moby-Dick,” a related exhibition at Neoteric Fine Art in Amagansett.
  •    Now is a wonderful time to go see the 1950s paintings by Charlotte Park on view at the Pollock-Krasner House in Springs. The show is at its best on the quieter days of autumn when there is less hustle and more time to contemplate the compositions and their place in the greater whole of the art of the era.

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