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  • Expressionism Part II
        The Pollock-Krasner House in Springs will have a discussion called “Expressionism in the 21st Century: Part 2” on Sunday from 4 to 6 p.m. Participants will include Sally Egbert, Connie Fox, Colin Goldberg, Carol Hunt, and Haim Mizrahi. Linda Hatofsky, the widow of Julius Hatofsky, a West Coast Expressionist, will discuss her late husband’s work.
        Contributions from the audience will be welcomed. Admission is free and no reservations are required.

  •    Victorian-era houses in Southampton Village are still prevalent, but many have lost their original style and flavor due to a modern preference for a cleaner, more open feeling. At least one Victorian in the village’s downtown, however, maintains its qualities both inside and out with a sensitive renovation that retains its character while accommodating a contemporary lifestyle.

  • Albertini Presents “Stuffed”
        Sydney Albertini will present “Stuff­ed and Other Feelings . . .” at Ille Arts in Amagansett beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

  •    Over several weeks last fall, late-season coastal storms and the Sandy Hook School shootings overwhelmed human emotional response. People who lost homes are still trying to put the pieces back together and those who lost loved ones will never be the same.

  •     Guild Hall’s 75th Members Show opened on Saturday and with it came the announcement of the winners selected by this year’s awards judge, Elisa­beth Sussman, curator of photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

  • Designed from the start to work in tandem with the museum, the grounds will evoke the rural features of the area and the museum structure, which the Swiss architects describe as an “agrarian vernacular shed.”
  • Scratching the Surface
        The Southampton Cultural Center is showing “Shaping the Surface” through May 20.
         Arlene Bujese organized the show, which features work with tactile or more three-dimensional surfaces. The artists include Bob Bachler, Jim Gemake, Margaret Kerr, Pope Noell, and Charles Waller, who employ such techniques as assemblage, collage, textural application, and modeling of forms using fired clay, found objects, clay bricks, thick paint, and paper/canvas collage.

  •    Behind a black curtain, a shaft of light fell from a vent in the eaves of the South Fork Natural History Museum barn, dimly illuminating video equipment and stacks of twigs and branches. To eyes grasping for a way to make sense of the space, it was a welcome sight. To Christine Sciulli, however, it was a challenge.

  •     On Saturday, LongHouse Reserve will open its grounds for the season with a riot of daffodils and some early cherry blossoms, among the other garden’s delights — some organic and some more structural.

  • Art Gets Its Groove Back
        This weekend at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, art and music will blend to form a show driven by a dance beat. “Art Groove,” in its third year, will present 14 contemporary artists with Motown, disco, and hip-hop music.

Blogs by this author:

  •      Elizabeth Dow, whose wall coverings and fabrics have been installed in the White House and in the private homes of Paul Simon, Harrison Ford, and Bill Gates to name a few, actually got her start as a painter and she continues in that medium to this day. Many of her recent works went on view at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday in a show called "Heaven" and will stay there until May 19.

  •      LongHouse Reserve offered a preview to both a sale of textiles from the collection of Jack Lenor Larsen and to what patrons will see on Saturday when the gardens open to the public for the season.

  •      If you look up Sammy’s Beach on the Internet, you are given maps, a lot of real estate listings, and a few photographs of a bay beach, typically with a lot of tire ruts. On Instagram it’s different, more arty shots of wind blown waves on a rocky shore, abstract amalgamations of jingle shells and seaweed, dramatic sunsets, and the like.

  •      The Spring Fling at the Parrish Art Museum may have been causing delays on the highway in front of its Water Mill headquarters, but over in East Hampton several gallery exhibitions opening on Saturday night, kept many residents close to home.

  •      If you think the tabs on pop top cans are mundane subject matter,  Alice Hope will likely change your mind with a show at  the Ricco Maresca Gallery in Chelsea. There, viewers will find a range of tab-inspired artworks that either incorporate the small metal pieces of  flotsam, elevate the form to sizable hanging sculpture, or come up with other interpretations wholly unique to the artist.

  •      Shigeru Ban, an architect known for both high-end and humanitarian projects using environmentally sensitive and recycled materials, has won this year's Pritzker Architecture Prize it was announced Monday.

  •      I had not planned on going to the Art Dealers Association of America show at the Park Avenue Armory so late. Initially, it was on my schedule for Thursday as my first drop in of the weekend, but I got in later than I thought, other plans arose, and the next thing I knew it was Sunday and it was quiet.

  •      Despite a reported increase in "fair fatigue" among dealers and collectors and a warm sunny day outside, the Armory Show packed the piers on Saturday with long lines to get in and crowded aisles and booths all afternoon. There were 205 exhibitors spread among two piers with 146 in the contemporary section and 59 in the modern section.
         While few dealers in the contemporary section featured East End artists, the modern selection had a good representation, both past and present.

  •      Seeming oddly out of the way in Soho, once the nexus of the contemporary art world, Volta NY offered a mostly focused presentation at its annual satellite fair during Armory art week in New York City.
         It was also the only fair in the city this week that attracted South Fork dealers: Halsey Mckay Gallery from East Hampton and Sara Nightingale Gallery from Water Mill. The fair was invitational and restricted to solo shows. 

  •      The Bruce High Quality Foundation's final Brucennial, a biannual event timed to the Whitney Museum of American Art's Biennial exhibition, is devoted only to women, this year in its final iteration. 
         Although there were rumors that some men submitted under female names, there was enough sheer quantity to earn the anonymous group a record for the largest female exhibition.