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  •       The “Willem de Kooning: Ten Paintings, 1983-1985” exhibition at the Gagosian gallery on Madison Avenue is grand in scale and vision. An expertly chosen sampling of the best works of the artist’s late period, the paintings sing together in a room that, while full of white space, seems barely able to contain them.

  •     At sea, it would be called a squall — gusty winds and torrential rain in a sudden onslaught on West 23rd Street that disappeared as quickly as it came — and Michael Light arrived recently at the Danziger Gallery in midst of it, poised but slightly dazed. It was an appropriately dramatic entrance for someone who describes his process of art making as “hurling myself into the landscape.” On that November morning, the cityscape was hurling something back at him.

  •     The walls are spare, painted black even, and the room would look like a tomb if the afternoon sun weren’t beaming in just so. It is what makes the show by Peter Sabbeth and Ross Watts at Sara Nightingale poetic and touching — trenchant, really, and not easy to forget.

  •        An artistic love child of Jackson Pollock and his mistress Ruth Kligman has garnered new legitimacy through the kind of police crime-lab science popularized in “CSI”-type television shows.

  •     Quite a long time ago and in a much different context, Ronald Reagan said “A tree’s a tree. How many more do you have to look at?” That observation may be misguided in a nature-loving sense, but it is also flawed in an artistic one.

  • A forensics investigator said "beyond reasonable doubt" that a painting Ruth Kligman claimed for years was Jackson Pollock's final work before his fatal car crash in 1956 was painted at the artist's house in Springs.
  •     With a fully reserved first performance of the “Water’s Edge Radio Hour” at Wolffer Estate Winery on Saturday, clearly an audience exists for a home-grown version of “A Prairie Home Companion,” the popular public radio staple.

  •     Marking the one-year anniversary of its Water Mill location, the Parrish Art Museum will have a weekend celebration for the community on Saturday and Sunday. Since last November, the museum has hosted 65,000 visitors and wants to encourage more through its temporary exhibitions, periodic reinstallations of the permanent collection, and regular concerts and special events.

  •     Guild Hall will open two exhibitions this week to inaugurate the museum’s fall season, each lively and provocative in its own way. In one gallery, Thomas Moran’s stylistic legacy and his preoccupation with European art movements will be examined in “Tracing Moran’s Romanticism and Symbolism.” In the other, Christa Maiwald will offer “Short Stories and Other Embroideries.” Ms. Maiwald was the winner of the 2011 members exhibition.

  •     It is funny, but I had to be reminded this week that Robert Dash wasn’t an abstract artist, not in the nonobjective sense anyway. The inveterate gardener, writer, and artist left us last month after a long illness, but his legacy in Madoo, his residence and conservancy, and his artwork, as well as a quite lengthy catalogue of columns he wrote for The Star over many years, will continue.

Blogs by this author:

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.

  • “White Hot + Blue” was the theme of this year’s LongHouse Reserve’s benefit in East Hampton on Saturday and the grounds and guests were done up just right.

  • Susan and Stanley Reifer will open their Bridgehampton garden on Saturday from 10 am to 3 pm. through the Garden Conservency.

    The garden was designed by Jian Guo Xu, Chinese artist who has incorporate Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism on the garden's five acres. The garden includes pavilions, bridges, and water features accessed by winding paths.

    The garden is at 5 Paumanok Road, Bridgehampton and  admission is $5.

  • The Parrish Art Museum’s sold-out Midsummer Party on Saturday night raised $1.25 million and attracted some 1,000 guests.

    The event honored Inga Maren Otto, a philanthropist, and Katharina Otto-Bernstein, a filmmaker and author.

  • Thursday night was the night to be in Bridgehampton. Long lines of cars snaked through the back roads and front roads around the Bridgehampton Museum and Nova's Ark where two annual art fairs have taken up residence for the next few days.

    It was the opening night for both ArtHamptons and Art Market Hamptons and even those with black cards, VIP passes, or other bells and whistles on their forms of entry had a tough time negotiating parking.

    Inside, however, all was lively and fun, as these photos of the Art Market Hamptons fair by Morgan McGivern demonstrate. 

  • An auction benefiting LongHouse Reserve is open for bidding now at Paddle 8. The sale is being held in conjunction with the East Hampton garden and art center’s annual benefit on July 19.

  • Filmmakers participating in the Stony Brook Southampton’s summer shorts 20-day intensive production workshop were given a warm welcome on Monday with an opening discussion with Todd Haynes, the director of “Far from Heaven,” “Velvet Goldmine,” “I’m Not There,” “Mildred Pierce,” “Safe,” and many other original and provocative films.