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  • Is it possible the holidays are finally over? Or worse, that the long nights of winter are now here? It used to be that the six weeks between New Year’s Day and Presidents Day were a dark lonely period of reflection and hibernation. Now, they’re an arts extravaganza, if not on par with the summer, then at least more accessible to the natives.

  • “Law & Order,” a show in its last week at Harper’s Books in East Hampton, is perfectly appropriate for the milieu. Brad Phillips, a Canadian artist, makes visual art often using text as subject matter, and not just any text but deeply evocative, assertive, assaulting, and sometimes disturbing text.

  • It’s been quite a year for Sarah Koenig. The Sagaponack native and Sag Harbor summer resident has gone from being known among a small, quirky subset of brainy public radio listeners for “This American Life” to what might be called an international sensation among a larger, quirky set of brainy podcast listeners.

  • The ground beneath the Hamptons art fairs is shifting this summer. For the past three years, Art Southampton held its fair at the Elks Lodge on County Road 39 in Southampton and opened two weeks after ArtHamptons and Art Market Hamptons. Nick Korniloff, director of Art Southampton, said last year he liked being on the highway and opening later. Yet he announced recently that his fair will be moving to Nova’s Ark on Millstone Road in Bridgehampton in 2015 and will run from July 9 through 13, two weeks earlier than last year.

  • One of the second wave of 20th-century artists who found their way to the South Fork and used the landscape as a chief source of inspiration, Jane Freilicher died on Dec. 9 at home in New York City of complications of pneumonia. She was 90.

  • Outside of some art-world friends who lived on the East End, Ray Johnson had a tenuous association here until his ultimate performance in Sag Harbor became the stuff of local and international legend and inextricably bound him to the area. Earnest young artists have made pilgrimages here to retrace his steps and delve for meaning in his use of the numeral 13 and its factors in his age, choice of date, and room number at Baron’s Cove Inn.

  • It is the time of year when galleries often scale their offerings down, not to include less, but to show more, albeit smaller, works at friendlier price points for gift giving. As much as the art world plays by different rules, size does matter, at least when determining value.

  • “The 50 Year Argument” by Martin Scorsese and David Tedeschi, screened at the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival, offers proof not just of the vitality of the documentary medium, but of the growing importance of the festival itself.

  • Although we may have become more jaded and immune to Robert Gober’s jarring dislocations of familiar objects and experiences, there is still something visceral and uncanny in the bringing together of many of them in one confined space.

    For the past few weeks, the Museum of Modern Art has had such an installation on its second floor. “The Heart Is Not a Metaphor” is an exhibition that not only takes over unusual spaces in the building but also disrupts them in service to the art.

  • Museum acquisition shows have an air of bridal and baby showers about them. A rather large group of gifts is assembled in one or several rooms while guests get to gawk at them and comment on their appropriateness or shortcomings. It’s rather fun.

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