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  • Art Gets Its Groove Back
        This weekend at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, art and music will blend to form a show driven by a dance beat. “Art Groove,” in its third year, will present 14 contemporary artists with Motown, disco, and hip-hop music.

  •     “Alice Aycock Drawings: Some Stories Are Worth Repeating,” will open this week at not one, but two venues — the Parrish Art Museum and the Grey Art Gallery at New York University.
        The show, presented in partnership with the two venues and organized by Jonathan Fineberg, an adjunct curator for the Parrish, will follow the artist’s creative process from 1971 to the present through the vital and early stages of her ideas and their development.

  •     Those who knew Marilyn Abel, and many here did through her work at the East Hampton Historical Society, book clubs, volunteer activities, and a range of other interests and passions, will remember her for her devoted friendship and dedication to social activism and the First Amendment.
        The long-time resident of East Hampton died on April 5 in Southampton Hospital after a brief illness. She was 74.

  • In an unheated beachfront cottage with a roaring fire, gourmet treats, and hot cider, Gary Ireland asked his neighbors and fellow villagers on Saturday to support his candidacy for Sagaponack Village's first mayor.

    Mr. Ireland, a lawyer who works primarily in New York but has an office in Bridgehampton, is running against Bill Tillotson, a full-time Sagaponack resident who owns a nursery and is co-chairman of the Sagaponack Citizens Advisory Committee.

  • Rolph Scarlett’s Geometrics
        Beginning next Thursday, Law­rence Fine Art in East Hampton will present a retrospective of the work of the American modernist painter Rolph Scarlett through May.
        Scarlett was a geometric abstractionist who shared affinities with Marsden Hartley, John Marin, and Joseph Stella. His varied stylistic career explored Cubism, Biomorphism, Abstract Expressionism, and Surrealism. According to the gallery, the artist worked with Jackson Pollock and also produced drip paintings.

  • A Polaroid image of Little Edie taken by Andy Warhol in 1976, a souvenir of the early post-film time, will be up for auction at Christie’s tomorrow. It is expected to sell for $5,000 to $7,000.
  • Putting It on Paper
        Arlene Bujese has returned to the Southampton Cultural Center to present “Paperwork” through April 22. A reception will take place on Saturday from 4 to 6 p.m.
        The exhibition, for which Ms. Bujese served as curator, will include collage, drawing, painting, and photography. The artists include Stephanie Brody-Lederman, Margery Harnick, Anne Sag­er, Roseann Schwab, Walter Schwab, Gail Miro, Mary Stubelek, Greg­ory Thorpe, E.E. Tucker, and Hans Van de Bovenkamp.

  •     A young girl glides through a museum that has some of the greatest works of art on display. In verse she finds herself reacting to the surroundings. Vincent van Gogh’s “Starry Night” makes her “twirly-whirly, twinkly, sparkly, super swirly.” Edvard Munch’s “Scream” makes her gasp, and a Degas dancer has her up on her tippy toes.

  •     The life and achievements of David G. Rattray, a poet and translator who was born and grew up in East Hampton, will be celebrated in Manhattan next week with a day and evening of readings, film, and visual art on the 20th anniversary of his death.
        Mr. Rattray was the brother of Everett Rattray, the longtime editor and publisher of The East Hampton Star, and uncle to his son, David E. Rattray, the current editor.

  • To Fool the Eye
        Todd Norsten will be featured in the solo show “This Isn’t How It Looks” at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton beginning Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

Blogs by this author:

  •      Elizabeth Dow, whose wall coverings and fabrics have been installed in the White House and in the private homes of Paul Simon, Harrison Ford, and Bill Gates to name a few, actually got her start as a painter and she continues in that medium to this day. Many of her recent works went on view at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday in a show called "Heaven" and will stay there until May 19.

  •      LongHouse Reserve offered a preview to both a sale of textiles from the collection of Jack Lenor Larsen and to what patrons will see on Saturday when the gardens open to the public for the season.

  •      If you look up Sammy’s Beach on the Internet, you are given maps, a lot of real estate listings, and a few photographs of a bay beach, typically with a lot of tire ruts. On Instagram it’s different, more arty shots of wind blown waves on a rocky shore, abstract amalgamations of jingle shells and seaweed, dramatic sunsets, and the like.

  •      The Spring Fling at the Parrish Art Museum may have been causing delays on the highway in front of its Water Mill headquarters, but over in East Hampton several gallery exhibitions opening on Saturday night, kept many residents close to home.

  •      If you think the tabs on pop top cans are mundane subject matter,  Alice Hope will likely change your mind with a show at  the Ricco Maresca Gallery in Chelsea. There, viewers will find a range of tab-inspired artworks that either incorporate the small metal pieces of  flotsam, elevate the form to sizable hanging sculpture, or come up with other interpretations wholly unique to the artist.

  •      Shigeru Ban, an architect known for both high-end and humanitarian projects using environmentally sensitive and recycled materials, has won this year's Pritzker Architecture Prize it was announced Monday.

  •      I had not planned on going to the Art Dealers Association of America show at the Park Avenue Armory so late. Initially, it was on my schedule for Thursday as my first drop in of the weekend, but I got in later than I thought, other plans arose, and the next thing I knew it was Sunday and it was quiet.

  •      Despite a reported increase in "fair fatigue" among dealers and collectors and a warm sunny day outside, the Armory Show packed the piers on Saturday with long lines to get in and crowded aisles and booths all afternoon. There were 205 exhibitors spread among two piers with 146 in the contemporary section and 59 in the modern section.
         While few dealers in the contemporary section featured East End artists, the modern selection had a good representation, both past and present.

  •      Seeming oddly out of the way in Soho, once the nexus of the contemporary art world, Volta NY offered a mostly focused presentation at its annual satellite fair during Armory art week in New York City.
         It was also the only fair in the city this week that attracted South Fork dealers: Halsey Mckay Gallery from East Hampton and Sara Nightingale Gallery from Water Mill. The fair was invitational and restricted to solo shows. 

  •      The Bruce High Quality Foundation's final Brucennial, a biannual event timed to the Whitney Museum of American Art's Biennial exhibition, is devoted only to women, this year in its final iteration. 
         Although there were rumors that some men submitted under female names, there was enough sheer quantity to earn the anonymous group a record for the largest female exhibition.