Author Information

Articles by this author:

  •     Those who thought the recent film version of “August: Osage County” was shrill might find the current production at the Southampton Cultural Center under Michael Disher’s direction more to their liking.

  •     Photographs typically need little introduction: what you see is what you see. With Herbert Matter, it is a different story.

  •     As a composer, Antonio Vivaldi rather owns spring through the popular co-opting of his violin concerto “La primavera.” So it is appropriate that the Choral Society of the Hamptons welcomes spring with “Viva Vivaldi!” — opting not to offer a cliched response to the arrival of the equinox, but to give a varied program of joyous music by the composer and others to awaken senses dulled and dormant from the long winter.

  • New housing and the preview of a Broadway play starring Marlo Thomas in the summer topped the news at the event.
  •     New York City’s art week has once again come to a close, and despite its perpetual sense of coal coming to Newcastle, the fairs and attendant events still packed them in, with long lines in many cases.

  • About 100 people showed up at the Avram Theater at Southampton College on Sunday night to discuss the college's closing and what might be done to save its undergraduate programs.
    Scott Carlin, a professor of environmental studies, moderated a panel that included Representative Tim Bishop, Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman, and Elizabeth Haile and Lance Gumbs of the Shinnecock Tribe.

    Mr. Gumbs noted that it was the first time that representatives of the Shinnecocks had been invited to enter discussions of the college's future.

  •     Many otherwise plugged-in cultural cog­noscenti of the South Fork might be surprised to learn that Philippe de Montebello is this year’s recipient of the Guild Hall Academy of the Arts Lifetime Achievement Award. It is not that the former and longtime Metropolitan Museum of Art director does not deserve it, but rather that few, if any, know he actually spends time here. He would like to keep it that way.

  •     After several years writing about art critically, it is often surprising what ends up being surprising. Is it just the setting that makes a group show of East End artists so striking in a Chelsea gallery or is it the art itself?

  •     Not every artist manages to continue refreshing his work into his 70s, but Keith Sonnier, through the aid of a new studio space in Bridgehampton, has managed to do just that. The evidence is on view at Pace Gallery in Chelsea through Feb. 22.

        The artist chose his most regular medium quite early in his career. Graduating from Rutgers University with an M.F.A. in 1966, it was only two years later that he began working in the neon gas lighting that has defined his sculpture ever since.

  •     Those who saw Jack Ceglic’s work at Ille Arts this summer would have been surprised by the most recent projects in his East Hampton studio last month. Although the familiar revealing and colorful portraits of friends and neighbors were well in evidence, hanging on the walls and most available surfaces were compositions expressed in the blackest of charcoal pastel.

Blogs by this author:

  • Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls will offer a night of "naughty one-acts" at the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Saturday night. Called "Taboo," the event is a benefit for "EVE," an original theatrical production the group is bringing to New York City in the fall.

  • Just like the buds on the trees and the first stirrings of crocuses and snowdrops this weekend, the winter hibernation of the South Fork art scene showed signs of abatement.

    At the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, three shows under the heading of "Perspectives," quick takes on artists who work or have worked on the East End, opened with receptions on Saturday and Sunday. The show features installations of three artists: Robert Dash, Jules Feiffer, and Joe Zucker.

  • Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton opened two shows this weekend, an artist-curated show in the Newtown Lane gallery and a single artist installation at the former residence and studio of Elaine de Kooning on Alewife Brook Road.

  • The Watermill Center hosted two open studios this weekend with Mary Ellen Bartley and Helene Patarot.

  • Julianne Moore, who played a woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in “Still Alice,” won the best actress Oscar for the role on Sunday night.

  • The Town of Southampton has asked residents to keep pets safe and warm indoors during these extreme weather conditions. Cold temperatures can be dangerous and even fatal to animals, which share a similar vulnerability to frostbite and hypothermia as humans. 

    Other dangers include salt and ice melting pellets, which can be toxic to animals, and automotive anti-freeze, which can cause renal failure and death. Most area stores carry products that melt ice, but are not toxic to pets.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center will celebrate Black History Month a bit early this year with a show dedicated to six regional and local artists opening on Saturday.

    Those exhibiting will include: Rosa Hanna Scott, a painter and photographer; John Pinderhughes, a photographer; Reynold Ruffins, an abstract artist; Tina Andrews, an abstract painter and sculptor; Sheril Antonio, a photographer; and Danny Simmons, an abstract artist.

  • The Southampton Cultural Center has added an additional audition for “A Chorus Line” on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Michael Disher will direct the Pulitzer-prize winning play with music by Marvin Hamlisch, who was a long-time Sag Harbor and Westhampton resident, with lyrics by Edward Kleban, and a book by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante.

    Although the starring roles of Zach and Cassie have been cast, there are still several roles, particularly male roles, that have not been filled.

  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.