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  • I like cold weather. I always have. But the wicked change in temperatures this past weekend was truly jarring for me. Just a few days prior to the freezing conditions, which were enhanced by the bitter northwesterly wind, I was walking around in shorts and a light T-shirt. I was reluctant to say goodbye to our warm weather.
  • The alarm was set to wake me up at 5 on Monday morning. But I was up well before dawn. In fact, I hardly slept at all that night. There was just too much anticipation running through my body to allow for a sound, deep sleep.
  • While I have always enjoyed fishing on my own boat, I truly appreciate joining some friends on a charter trip.
  • Culling through the pile was no easy chore. Many were well worn and encrusted with white, dried-out barnacles. But others were in good shape.
  • There were some decent reports of cod a week earlier, but the ever-present black sea bass could be a problem. While they are widely proclaimed to be one of the tastiest fish, sadly, we would not be able retain any, as the season for them in Rhode Island and federal waters (more than three miles offshore) remains closed until this coming Sunday.
  • Blackfish, or tautog or tog as they are also commonly referred to, will not win many underwater beauty contests. Compared to other fish like the exalted and highly prized striped bass, they’re just not the prettiest to admire from up close or from afar.
  • Those of us here on eastern Long Island are fortunate that we have not experienced a direct hit from a storm thus far. While we are finally past the peak of hurricane season in the Atlantic basin, we still have another two months to keep our guard up. May our good fortunes continue.
  • For those with a competitive spirit, the fall season is prime time in Montauk to take part in a number of fishing contests, especially if you are one to ply your skills from the beach.
  • If you are a fan of catching black sea bass, you have certainly been spoiled for a number of years by the increasingly large biomass of the fish. It seems they are everywhere, and now they are showing up in locations never seen before.
  • Our "On the Water" columnist enters the clam-shucking contest at Harborfest in Sag Harbor. At left, Peter Ambrose, top shucker.