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  • Andrew Geller’s uninhibited, angular houses of the 1950s and 1960s were cut from a playful mold. He was known as “the architect of happiness,” having designed the prefabricated Leisurama houses marketed for middle-income families by Macy’s, which came fully furnished. For as little as $590 down and $73 a month — or somewhat more if you splurged — you could take your toothbrush, buy groceries, and enjoy the summer, even at Montauk, where some 200 were built. To his detractors, Geller was an outsider, but it was a concept he relished.
  • “It was so special — a three-story house,” Viola Rouhani, the architect of what became the Treehouse in Amagansett, said. “We knew we had to preserve it and have it grandfathered in to keep that view.”
  • Accompanying 233 juniors from East Hampton High School, Michael Sarlo, the chief of police in East Hampton, returned to the site where almost 16 years ago he arrived with other police officers from the East End to help with the devastation of Sept. 11, which killed almost 3,000 people.
  • Over the last 20 years, the Springs School has accomplished what mainstream opera — in its 400 or so years of history — has been unable to do: engage a young audience.
  • Seventy-three East Hampton High School students were recognized at the school last week for outstanding achievement in Spanish, French, and Latin, under the umbrella of the World Languages Honor Society.
  • In local school board elections on Tuesday, five newcomers won seats, with a write-in candidate besting an incumbent in Amagansett and first-timers ousting incumbents in Sag Harbor.
  • Five short plays written and performed by East End middle school students will be presented at Stony Brook Southampton’s Avram Theater on Saturday at 7 p.m. as the culminating event of this year’s Young Artists and Writers Project middle school playwriting program.
  • A beloved Springs School fund-raiser, the annual Seedlings Project Plant Sale, will be back on Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Springs residents and officials reviewed the latest proposals for the long-sought expansion of the district’s school on Monday, hearing that taxpayers might be asked to approve between $14.7 million and $15.2 million next year in order for building to begin in 2019 and be completed by 2021.

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