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  •     Were George Washington alive today, he wouldn’t have to apologize for cutting down the cherry tree: He would repurpose it. That’s what Susan Goldstein did with two cherry trees that were in decline on her North Haven property, one of which was more than 100 years old. Instead of letting the wood end up in a landfill, she challenged Will Paulson, a Mattituck cabinetmaker, to find uses for it. He turned out a massive dining room table, a living room cocktail table, stair treads, a bathroom counter, and several decorative pieces for the house.

  • The diminutive white frame house on Union Street in Sag Harbor is known both as the 1693 house and the “five-times-moved house.” Judith Auchincloss, who purchased it in 2010 from the tennis pro Guillermo Vilas, described it to a recent visitor as “sort of magical.” A real estate broker in New York City who has been a longtime summer resident here, she owned a house in Bridgehampton until 2002.
  • Every year, South Fork artists garner new and increased attention at the various fairs and events that make up Miami’s Art Basel week. Whether in the grand booths of the Miami Beach Convention Center, in a funky satellite in Wynwood or North Beach, in a family museum in an old warehouse, in a pool cabana, or even in a hotel room, exhibitors from around the corner or around the world bring international exposure to our regional faves and allow us to see how they measure up to the giants of the current and historical marketplace.
  • ArtSolar will hold a reception and exhibition of work by nine East End artists on Saturday from 3 to 6 p.m. at 12 Koala Lane in East Hampton. Take a Thanksgiving ArtWalk on Saturday afternoon from 1 to 5. Twenty-five galleries from Southampton to Montauk will participate in the self-guided tour, and many will accept donations of food and/or money for local food pantries.
  • P­leasant Lane in East Hampton Village is an unassuming cul-de-sac off Newtown Lane between Mary’s Marvelous and the Suffolk County National Bank. Not the kind of street where you’d expect to find an alchemist at work in a studio hidden by dense privet, transforming molten beeswax, resin, and pigment into thickly painted surfaces from which she excavates an expansive range of swirling, mutating forms.
  • Artists and musicians are invited to bring their work down to the Woodbine Collection in Montauk on Saturday from noon to 5 p.m. The artwork will hang until Dec. 5. The Peter Marcelle Project in Southampton will open “Susan Ecker: Players, Places” with a reception on Saturday from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • The Springs Community Theater Company will present “The Wizard of Oz” in seven performances at Guild Hall over the next two weekends, starting tomorrow at 7 p.m. The production will feature the music and lyrics created for the original MGM motion picture by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg and the book by John Kane, adapted in 1987 for the Royal Shakespeare Company in London.
  • The circus came to the Watermill Center on Saturday. There were acrobatics, juggling, and feats of strength and balance, all of which left the audience awestruck. But because Sweden’s Cirkus Cirkor is a contemporary circus with roots in experimental dance, theater, film, music, and visual art, the group’s open rehearsal of a work in progress was a mesmerizing, haunting, and entertaining evening quite unlike the circus most of us grew up with.
  • Anne Seelbach will teach private watercolor classes at the Victor and Mabel D’Amico house in Lazy Point, Amagansett, starting Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to noon. The Sara Nightingale Gallery in Water Mill will open concurrent solo exhibitions of work by Cara Enteles and Stephanie Brody-Lederman with a reception on Saturday from 5 to 7 p.m.
  • On Saturday afternoon at 3, at Guild Hall, Christina Strassfield will interview Elizabeth Strong-Cuevas on the occasion of the publication by Abrams Books of “Strong-Cuevas Sculpture: Premonitions in Retrospect.” The Peter Marcelle Gallery in Southampton will show the work of Jim Gemake beginning Saturday, with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

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  • The graduate program is now accepting applications for next fall.
  • The Hamptons Film Festival presented a double feature in Sag Harbor on Sunday afternoon.

  • The subject is the increasing radicalization of German youth from the mid-1960s through the formation of the Red Army Faction a/k/a the Baader-Meinhof group in 1970.
  • Sag Harbor's HarborFest 2015 offers maritime fun all weekend long.
  • This year’s festival will include the world premiere of “The Champions,” a documentary by Darcy Dennett that follows the pit bulls rescued from the fighting ring of Michael Vick, the NFL quarterback, and the people who fought to save them despite pressure from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and the Humane Society to euthanize them.
  • Christmas Performances
    The Old Whalers Church will hold two Christmas celebrations this weekend. A radio play version of “A Christmas Carol” will be performed in the chapel of the church tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. The free, hourlong show will include members of the East End theater community, church members, friends, and sound effects.

  • Saturday's foul weather didn't deter filmmakers and filmgoers from a festive brunch at c/o the Maidstone, which serves as the headquarters for the Hamptons International Film Festival. Mimosas, bloody marys, and passed hors d'oeuvres helped warm up a happy crowd.

  • The Hamptons International Film Festival's official kickoff took place at Guild Hall Thursday night with a screening of Theodore Melfi's "St. Vincent" starring Melissa McCarthy as newly single mother who must leave her 12-year-old son (Jaeden Lieberher) in the care of her curmudgeonly new neighbor, played by Bill Murray, while she works.

  • "Charlie's Country" is the third collaboration between David Gulpilil, an Australian Aboriginal actor, and Rolf de Heer, a Dutch-born director who lives in Australia. Mr. Gulpilil plays the title character, who lives in a Northern Territory Aboriginal community where white laws have encroached and undermined the traditional ways of life.

  • The annual Box Art Auction to benefit East End Hospice will take place Saturday from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the Ross School Center for Well-Being in East Hampton. Now in its 14th year, the event is the hospice’s only annual fund-raiser held in East Hampton.

    Each year, approximately 100 artists transform small cigar and wine boxes into works of portable art. Among this year’s participants are Jennifer Cross, Eric Fischl, Connie Fox, April Gornik, Priscilla Heine, William King, Rex Lau, Stephanie Brody-Lederman, and Frank Wimberly.