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  •     Were George Washington alive today, he wouldn’t have to apologize for cutting down the cherry tree: He would repurpose it. That’s what Susan Goldstein did with two cherry trees that were in decline on her North Haven property, one of which was more than 100 years old. Instead of letting the wood end up in a landfill, she challenged Will Paulson, a Mattituck cabinetmaker, to find uses for it. He turned out a massive dining room table, a living room cocktail table, stair treads, a bathroom counter, and several decorative pieces for the house.

  • The sculptor Paul Pavia grew up surrounded by art. His father, Philip Pavia, was a sculptor, and his mother, Natalie Edgar, is a painter. Starting in 1986 when he was 15 years old, their son spent 12 summers in Pietrasanta, Italy, a Tuscan town that has drawn artists for centuries to its marble studios and foundries. He learned figurative sculpture and helped his father, who taught carving there.
  • “Small Works (Part Two),” an exhibition organized by Folioeast, an online gallery founded by Coco Myers to showcase the work of East End artists, will take place at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts in Bridgehampton from Saturday through Jan. 30. An opening will be held Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m. The RJD Gallery, which will reopen in its new space on Main Street in Bridgehampton in March, has issued an open call to artists for submissions to the eighth annual Hamptons Juried Art Show to benefit the Retreat. The show will open at the gallery on April 22.
  • “The Money Shot,” a play by Neil LaBute, which Variety’s Scott Foundas called “an acid-tongued showbiz satire” when it premiered Off Broadway in 2014, will have a two-and-a-half week run at the Southampton Cultural Center starting next Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
  • For those whose taste in films includes the offbeat and independent, the East Hampton Library will present free screenings of six foreign films in its annual Winter International Film Festival, which will open on Sunday at 2 p.m. with “Antonia’s Line,” a Dutch production that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film in 1996. The festival continues on consecutive Sunday afternoons with the exception of Feb. 5. All films have English subtitles.
  • The RJD Gallery which was destroyed during the recent fire in Sag Harbor, will reopen in a new facility on Main Street in Bridgehampton. Richard Demato, the proprietor of RJD Gallery hopes to open in mid-March. ArtUNPRIMED, an online art gallery and consultation service specializing in emerging and mid-career artists from the East End, will mount three exhibitions at 7 Main Street in Sag Harbor, beginning Saturday with an opening reception for “Water,” a group show, from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • The Hamptons International Film Festival never sleeps. Just when you might think it is on a hiatus, along comes its annual Winter Classic screening.
  • “Farms, Water, and East End Scenes,” a show of work by Aubrey Grainger, a plein-air painter from Sagaponack, is on view at the Quogue Library’s art gallery through Jan. 29. The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will present the next iteration of “The Artists View,” an ongoing program of intimate gallery talks by artists from the exhibition “Artists Choose Artists,” tomorrow at 6 p.m.
  • Workers on the autism spectrum rise to the occasion at South Fork Bakery, opened by a licensed speech and language therapist and family coach who has always loved to bake.
  • Amid a flurry of holiday film releases and the inevitable handicapping of the races for Oscars and Golden Globes, “American Masters,” the award-winning PBS biography series, will launch its 31st season on Tuesday at 8 p.m. on PBS with the nationwide premiere of “By Sidney Lumet.”

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