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  • If you can’t get to today’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, a new book from Rizzoli that celebrates the event’s 90th anniversary might be the next best thing. “Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade: A New York Holiday Tradition,” includes archival photographs and an essay by Steven M. Silverman on its past and present, but what really brings the parade to life are the more than 100 color photographs by Matt Harnick, who divides his time between East Hampton and New York City.
  • Considering the issues it examines, the timing of this year’s African American Film Festival could not have been more fortuitous, according to Brenda Simmons, executive director of the Southampton African American Museum and organizer of the festival.
  • The plein air landscapes of the South Fork by the Australian artist, Ashley Frost will be shown at the Parasol Projects Pop-Up Gallery on Rivington Street in New York City through Monday. Roman Fine Art in East Hampton will present “Get With the Program II,” an exhibition of contemporary painting, photography, and sculpture, from Saturday through Jan. 8. A reception is set for Saturday from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • Minerva Perez is not an absolute newcomer to the OLA Latino Film Festival, having been involved in its setup in 2007, but this year’s, the 13th iteration presented by the Organizacion Latino Americana, is the first she has put together as that organization’s executive director, a post she assumed in February.
  • Between 1950 and 1990, the Eastman Kodak Company installed 565 color transparencies 18 feet tall and 60 feet long in New York City’s Grand Central Station. The images, known as Coloramas, portrayed a Norman Rockwell-like, predominantly white idealization of American life, while also advertising various products and activities.
  • Three East End artists — Alice Hope, Bastienne Schmidt, and Linda Stein will be in the show “Overlap: Life Tapestries,”in the A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn. A reception will be held next Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. Helen A. Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs, will be among the lecturers this weekend at the Royal Academy of Arts in London in connection with the exhibition “Abstract Expressionism: Expressions of Change.”
  • Many notable artists — among them Dan Flavin, Sol LeWitt, and Brice Marden — worked at museums early in their careers, usually as security guards, but few kept one foot in the studio and one in a museum for three decades. George Negroponte managed to do just that.
  • Written in 1850 and set two centuries earlier, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Scarlet Letter” is in some respects eerily relevant in an election year punctuated by the revelation and condemnation of sexual indiscretions by politicians and other public figures, with press coverage in effect serving the same function as Hester Prynne’s scarlet A.
  • The Amagansett Library, in association with the Art Barge, will offer free basic drawing and figure drawing classes on Saturdays in November and December, under the tutelage of Linda Capello. A memorial exhibition of the artwork of Francesco Bologna, the East Hampton artist, gallerist, and frame shop owner who died in August, will take place at Ashawagh Hall in Springs with a reception on Saturday from 4 to 7 p.m. Family members and collectors will be lending paintings and pastel works on paper.
  • Since their inauguration in 2009, the Parrish Art Museum’s biennial “Artists Choose Artists” exhibitions have demonstrated the enduring depth and diversity of the East End’s art community. The series’ fourth iteration, which will open Sunday and remain on view through Jan. 16, will again feature the work of seven distinguished jurors and the 14 artists they have selected from more than 200 submissions.

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