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  • Sciulli at Duck Creek Farm

    “Quiet Riot,” a site-specific installation by Christine Sciulli, will open today with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. in the John Little Barn at Duck Creek Farm in Springs and remain on view through Sept. 20.

    Ms. Sciulli, who lives in Amagansett and New York, uses projected light to explore the potential of simple geometry. The exhibition, which has been organized by the John Little Society and Jess Frost, will be open Fridays and Saturdays from 4 to 7 p.m. and by appointment.

  • Athos Zacharias’s house on Copeces Lane in Springs is unlike any other in the neighborhood. It is a two-story rectangular solid, constructed of whitewashed concrete block, flat-roofed, with large windows, an outdoor circular staircase, and an exterior block wall painted to resemble a Mondrian. The entrance is through the kitchen.

  • “ToasT,” a new play by the acclaimed spoken-word artist and Tony Award-winning writer Lemon Andersen and directed by Elise Thoron, will be given a staged reading at Guild Hall tonight at 8. A Public Theater commission first presented at the Public’s Under the Radar festival, “ToasT” weaves characters from black oral narratives into a drama about a group of inmates at Attica during the 1971 riots at the prison.

  • New at Halsey Mckay

    Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton is presenting two concurrent exhibitions through Aug. 24. “Waterworks” features Karl Haendel and Adam Helms, both of whom transform pre-existing images from pop culture, news media, the Internet, and other sources, in this case, water-related subjects.

  • “Robert Motherwell: The East Hampton Years, 1944-1952” will open Saturday at Guild Hall and remain on view through Oct. 13. The exhibition will include 22 works from important private and public collections that illuminate a portion of Motherwell’s work that is not well known or often exhibited.

  • “Summer Job” at Harper’s

    “Summer Job,” an exhibition of recent work by Enoc Perez, will open Saturday at Harper’s Books in East Hampton and remain on view through Oct. 14.

    The series, which includes collages, two sculptures, and a selection of repurposed three-dimensional objects, juxtaposes products of high and low culture and forms of high and low artistic media. Using found images, Mr. Perez investigates the changing nature of representation in the age of social media.

  • Arlene Slavin’s “Intersections” series, on view at Guild Hall through Oct. 13, consists of outdoor sculptures made up of interwoven, translucent, colored vinyl strips, and paintings whose bands of color make similar use of the grid and the diagonal. These new works, most of which were produced over the past two years, refer consciously to paintings Ms. Slavin was making during the early 1970s.

  • Philippe Petit, the French high-wire artist who captured the world’s imagination in 1973 with his walk between the two 110-story towers of the World Trade Center, will repeat his elevated stroll at LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton at 6 p.m. next Thursday, the 40th anniversary of his historic feat.

    Titled “Look Up,” his performance will use the same wire, tensioning device, and balancing pole and will cover the same distance, but at a height of 20 feet instead of almost 1,400.

  • The 47th annual Artists of the Springs Invitational Exhibit will open at Ashawagh Hall tomorrow and remain on view through Aug. 17. An opening reception will be held tomorrow from 5 to 8 p.m., and the exhibition’s curator, Sue Ferguson Gussow, will lead a tour of the show on Aug. 16 from 4 to 5 p.m.

  • Two at Drawing Room

    Concurrent shows of works on paper by Sue Heatley and sculpture by Adrian Nivola will be on view at the Drawing Room in East Hampton from tomorrow through Aug. 31.

    Ms. Heatley, who lives in East Hampton, was influenced by the intense color and visual stimuli she encountered while in India in 2012. Her new work expands on her longstanding interest in patterns and textures with a vibrant palette, sweeping lines, looping archways, and ornamental fields activating the picture plane.

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  • The annual Box Art Auction to benefit East End Hospice will take place Saturday from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the Ross School Center for Well-Being in East Hampton. Now in its 14th year, the event is the hospice’s only annual fund-raiser held in East Hampton.

    Each year, approximately 100 artists transform small cigar and wine boxes into works of portable art. Among this year’s participants are Jennifer Cross, Eric Fischl, Connie Fox, April Gornik, Priscilla Heine, William King, Rex Lau, Stephanie Brody-Lederman, and Frank Wimberly.

  • The Hamptons International Film Festival announced their annual awards Monday morning at the East Hampton Presbyterian Church.

    The festival’s Audience Awards went to Stephen Frears’s “Philomena,” a drama starring Dame Judi Dench, and “Desert Runners,” Jennifer Steinman’s documentary about the 4 Deserts Race Series of 150-mile ultramarathons. Irene Taylor Brodsky’s “One Last Hug (…And a Few Smooches): Three Days at Grief Camp” won the Audience Award for Best Short.

  •    Filmed in Bellport over a period of 18 days for $700,000, "The Maid's Room" has the look of an expensive Hollywood production. “We did everything we could to make a local film, but not a small film,” says Michael Walker, its director.