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Articles by this author:

  • New at Halsey Mckay
        An installation by Kysa Johnson and paintings by Annabelle Speer will go on view Saturday at the Halsey Mckay Gallery in East Hampton. Ms. Johnson’s paintings, drawings, and installations utilize as imagery what she terms “microscopic or macroscopic ‘landscapes,’ ” including maps of the universe and the molecular structure of pollutants.

  •        Lana Jokel, whose documentary “Larry Rivers Public and Private” won this year’s Filmmaker’s Choice Award from the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival, has enjoyed a long career as a film director and editor, but it’s not one her upbringing encouraged. One of three children of a wealthy Shanghai industrialist, she spent her early years in that city before the 1949 triumph of Mao Zedong’s army forced the family to move to Hong Kong.

  •       The Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival returns to Bay Street Theatre this weekend with a slate of 11 features and 11 shorts, including special programs devoted to D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus, pioneers of cinema verité, and Lana Jokel, this year’s Filmmaker’s Choice Award winner.

  • Meola’s “Born to Run” Photos

           Eric Meola, a photographer and Sagaponack resident who captured the iconic image of Bruce Springsteen and Clarence Clemons for the cover of the 1975 album “Born to Run,” is exhibiting a selection of photographs at the Tulla Booth Gallery in Sag Harbor from among the 700 taken during the two-hour photo shoot. While images from that session have been widely published in magazines, they have seldom been exhibited as large, archival prints, according to Ms. Booth.

  • The Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival returns to the Bay Street Theatre this weekend with 11 features, 11 shorts, and programs devoted to the cinema verité pioneers D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus and this year’s Filmmaker’s Choice Award winner, Lana Jokel. Faith Middleton will moderate a panel discussion.
  •     Hanukkah comes early this year, surprising almost everyone by coinciding with Thanksgiving — for the first time since 1888. The eight-day Jewish holiday takes place on the 25th day in the month of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar, falling on different days on the Gregorian calendar each year because the ancient Hebrew year (it is now 5774) has 354 rather than 365 days and even an extra month.

  •     Billy Rayner hasn’t been to China. Or Japan. But he’s been practically everywhere else during the past 50 years and kept diaries filled with watercolors, photographs, observations, historical information, and memorabilia. “Notes and Sketches: Travel Journals of William P. Rayner,” a two-volume set, has just been published by Glitterati Incorporated, allowing readers a view into a life fully lived.

  • Ruffins at John Jermain
        Reynold Ruffins, an award-winning painter, illustrator, and designer, will exhibit a selection his illustrations at the John Jermain Memorial Library in Sag Harbor from Wednesday through Jan. 18. Mr. Reynolds, who lives in Sag Harbor, graduated from Cooper Union and received its most prestigious honor, the Augustus Saint-Gaudens Award for outstanding professional achievement in arts.

  • Nature Times Two
        “East/West,” an exhibition of work by Annie Sessler and John Todaro, will be on view at Ashawagh Hall in Springs Saturday and Sunday. The title of the show reflects Ms. Sessler’s use of the Japanese craft tradition of Gyotaku, fish printing, and Mr. Todaro’s travels to the American West. Nature is subject and inspiration for both artists.

  •     I have a nose, but it doesn’t work. Actually, my nose works; it’s my brain that doesn’t. Nine years ago, visiting my sister-in-law in rural Pennsylvania, I fell down a flight of stone steps to the cement floor of her basement. A six-pack of Rolling Rock cushioned my fall. When I picture how it must have looked, I see a hilarious pratfall. But to my wife, son, in-laws, and nephews looking on, it wasn’t funny.

Blogs by this author:

  • Saturday's foul weather didn't deter filmmakers and filmgoers from a festive brunch at c/o the Maidstone, which serves as the headquarters for the Hamptons International Film Festival. Mimosas, bloody marys, and passed hors d'oeuvres helped warm up a happy crowd.

  • The Hamptons International Film Festival's official kickoff took place at Guild Hall Thursday night with a screening of Theodore Melfi's "St. Vincent" starring Melissa McCarthy as newly single mother who must leave her 12-year-old son (Jaeden Lieberher) in the care of her curmudgeonly new neighbor, played by Bill Murray, while she works.

  • "Charlie's Country" is the third collaboration between David Gulpilil, an Australian Aboriginal actor, and Rolf de Heer, a Dutch-born director who lives in Australia. Mr. Gulpilil plays the title character, who lives in a Northern Territory Aboriginal community where white laws have encroached and undermined the traditional ways of life.