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  • The Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor will kick off its 25th summer season Saturday night with “How Long Has This Been Going On?” an evening of stories, songs, and laughs with Mario Cantone and Jerry Dixon, followed next week by the world premiere of “The Forgotten Woman,” a new comedy-drama by Jonathan Tolins.
  • Among the best-known benefits are the Parrish Art Museum’s Midsummer Party and the Bay Street Theater’s 25th Summer Gala, both of which are likely to sell out in advance despite being held the same evening. Art or theater, it’s your choice.
  • The Art Barge on Napeague will open for classes on June 6, featuring courses in studio painting and ceramics. The Springs Improvement Society will hold its 32nd annual members’ show from tomorrow through Monday at Ashawagh Hall.
  • The first-ever Sag Harbor Cultural Heritage Day will bring to the village a plethora of programs and events related to its history, culture, community, and music on Saturday starting at 10 a.m. and continuing throughout the day and evening.
  • “Water, water everywhere . . . but is it safe to drink?” If he were alive today, Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner might have told a different, less poetic story, perhaps as a speaker at “Tideland Sessions,” an all-day program of talks and performances organized in conjunction with the Parrish Art Museum’s current exhibition, “Radical Seafaring.”
  • Sitting in the living room of the Sag Harbor apartment-studio where he has lived for most of the past 30 years, surrounded by books, objects, sketchbooks, and dozens, if not hundreds, of paintings, David Slater apologized for the clutter, lit a stick of incense, and began to weave the threads of a life fully lived. Early on, he recalled, “My father was an artist. He would say things like ‘The life of art is so hard that I tied a brush to my son’s crib, and every time he would reach for it I would slap his hand.’ ” In Mr. Slater’s case, Pavlovian conditioning didn’t work.
  • The Watermill Center is shedding the relatively low profile it has maintained for the past few weeks with a weekend of open studios and rehearsals by resident artists, a guided tour of the facility, and the second installment of its spring International Brunch series.
  • The new gallery Art Space 98 will open Saturday at 98 Newtown Lane in East Hampton. The inaugural exhibition, “People and Lost Traces,” which will open Saturday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m., will include paintings by Thomas Buehler and clay assemblages by Rosemarie Schiller. Paton Miller, the Southampton artist whose work reflects his extensive travels and his admiration of such Spanish artists as Goya, Velazquez, and El Greco, will show new paintings at the Monika Olko Gallery in Sag Harbor from tomorrow through June 13.
  • The surprising thing about an exhibition of outdoor sculpture in the Springs Historic District is that it hasn’t happened before. The idea came to Loring Bolger two years ago, when she helped organize a show of Bill King’s work at Duck Creek Farm in the hamlet. Ms. Bolger is a board member of the Springs Improvement Society and one of the founders of the John Little Society.
  • The Drawing Room in East Hampton will open two new exhibitions tomorrow. A stoneware sculpture show by Toni Ross and a show by Irene Kopelman, Pat Pickett, and Alexis Rockman that finds inspiration in the direct contact of the artist with nature. Amy Kirwin has been appointed the new director of programs at the Southampton Arts Center.

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