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  • A humble cottage avoided the fate of many of the South Fork's vernacular buildings and was moved from Lumber Lane in Bridgehampton to a one-acre plot on the west side of Town Line Road in Sagaponack. Among its secrets: wine-cork traces of a tenant long gone.
  • In an era in which too much is never enough — as ostentatiously expressed in new and reconstructed residences built to the absolute maximum size allowed by zoning — a wooded one-acre-plus parcel in Springs is an oasis of playfulness.

  • In 2011, after looking at 125 houses — some, admittedly, online — Tracy Jamar, an artist, and Monty Silver, a retired talent agent whose agency represented Jon Voight, Roy Scheider, Celeste Holm, Laurence Fishburne, and others, received a call from a friend in real estate who exclaimed, “You’ve got to come quick. You’ve got to come quick.

  • “I’m a view person,” Susan Dusenberry said not long ago, and it’s true. She has four.

  • Nestled among houses just north of Montauk Highway in a neighborhood known as Ludlow Greens in Bridgehampton is a covered wooden bridge, which creates a bucolic vista and surprises those who come across it for the first time.

  • Down a long, narrow driveway running past the historic Thomas Halsey Homestead in Southampton, Leslie and George Biddle’s weekend and summer retreat is a rambling Victorian full of quirky and fanciful details in its many rooms, porches, and spaces.
  • It is possible, in undertaking a renovation of a house that dates to an earlier time, to respect its architecture and to also reflect the character of new owners.
  • Like all living things, plants are organized into natural units or families based on their genetic similarities. Understanding what family your favorite garden plant is a member of can help you better care and plan for it. For a botanist, looking at the flower (the reproductive structure) is usually all that’s needed to identify a plant's family.

  • In 1986, two Amagansett neighbors, Bill Shank, an architectural designer, and John Whitney, a garden designer and horticulturist, often found themselves having conversations over their common back fence about horticulture. They realized that they both thought it would be great for the East End horticultural community to be better connected.

  • Crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia) was virtually unknown in our area as recently as three decades ago. Two things changed that.

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