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  • As the South Fork is enveloped in autumn’s abundant colors, a recently opened farm stand is offering the fruits of long labor in Bridgehampton’s fertile fields.
  • For as long as the water is warm enough, Priscilla Rattazzi and Chris Whittle keep a fleet of kayaks, paddleboards, and two small sailboats at the edge of Georgica Pond, ready for a jaunt around the pond or a trip across it to the ocean beach in the near distance.
  • Not every old house that gets snapped up on the South Fork is razed to make way for a bigger one. Especially not in Sag Harbor, and especially not the house Alex Matthiessen bought in 2002.
  • The third annual Springs Agricultural Fair at the Ashawagh Hall farmers market last Saturday drew human competitors in vegetable growing and flower arranging, while canines and poultry, aided by their human overseers, vied for recognition as most accomplished in tricks, and prettiest, respectively.

  • The work of Hans Hokanson, the Swedish-born sculptor who lived in East Hampton from 1961 until his death in 1997, is in many notable public and private collections, but a massive work that would be at home in a museum or a sculpture park such as the Storm King Art Center, where his other work is represented, has remained out of view in a secluded East Hampton house for 45 years.
  • It was 1977 when Jane Maynard and her husband, Walter Maynard, went looking for land on which to build a second home. They were shown a 10.7-acre site at the end of a long driveway just off Georgica Road, right in the heart of East Hampton.
  • Craig Socia, who has designed hundreds, if not thousands, of gardens — English country, stylish contemporary, Mediterranean, you name it — began imagining what he would like to do at his own property from the moment he arrived on Accabonac Road in East Hampton in 1999. In the following dozen years or so, he created a compound of three houses, each with an individual garden, while tending an eponymous landscape company.
  • Awhite, two-story house with a sailboat in the driveway on a quiet East Hampton street gives no clue to the artistry and craftsmanship of its inhabitants. Once inside, however, the creativity of its owners, Abigail and Paul Vogel, is visible everywhere.
  • Most interior designers meticulously arrange their clients’ houses before being photographed, spending hours fluffing pillows, folding towels, and filling each room with vases of freshly cut flowers. But when the camera recently turned on his own house, which is hexagonal and sits on stilts on the oceanfront in Amagansett, David Netto, an interior designer and writer, rearranged not a thing, leaving his bed partly unmade and the contents of his overnight bag strewn about.
  • Well-behaved ghosts haunt East Hampton if you know how to find them. The hand-hewn beams of the village’s oldest houses, for instance, dated by experts to the 1680s, can still be seen, emerging like spectral cartoon characters from white “sheets” of modern plaster.

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