Author Information

Articles by this author:

  • A beautiful waterfront house on a bluff in Springs may be an unlikely place for a museum, but suspend your disbelief. This is no archive of ancient artifacts nor a paean to priceless paintings. No, this is the Museum of Low Taste, or MOLT, a good-humored and astonishingly expansive assemblage of midcentury kitsch — ceramic figurines, lazy susans, and commemorative items, among other things — a proud and highly concentrated collection that numbers in the thousands.
  • Susan Wood Richardson, a photographer who has worked for magazines and movie companies all over the world, recently dropped anchor in Amagansett in a house that is large enough for the furniture she has collected at auctions and yard sales and antiques shops, including Balasses House, which used to be in Amagansett.
  • Born out of necessity, rather than in pursuit of any “reclaimed” aesthetic, is the house that Nick Cohen built.
  • When Barbara Toll, an art adviser and former gallery owner, sold her Sag Harbor house and moved into a two-bedroom condominium in the Watchcase factory in 2015, she was eager to give up the maintenance responsibilities that come with homeownership, but she wanted to retain some of the aspects of her former, beloved home.
  • Customers come from near and far and at this point the general manager of London Jewelers in East Hampton can often spot them the minute they walk in. They are almost always men, and when they look at the cases of glittering jewelry and watches and rings, they suddenly seem unsure they’re in the right place. Then, with a quick glance, they see “Humidor” in big letters on a glass door to the right and shelves of cigars inside a climate-controlled, walk-in room.
  • Party. To Party. What does it mean? What does it require? What elusive substance is it that marks the difference between attending a party and partying in the verb?
  • More than a decade before Jason Biondo was born, Macy’s, the department store, and Raymond Loewy, the prolific industrial designer, commissioned the renowned architect Andrew Geller to design about 200 prefabricated houses for Culloden Point, a peninsula less than three miles from Montauk’s downtown. It was 1963, and the Leisurama homes, as they were called, cost between $13,000 and $17,000.
  • Two years ago, when the old Federal-Italianate residence at 6 Union Street in Sag Harbor finally escaped the years-long grip of bank foreclosures and landed in the hands of real estate developers, it was in a state of near collapse. Its windows were boarded, the front porch was in danger of caving in, and there was a hole in the roof of an addition at the back. The building, which is thought to date to the 1760s, has long been called the Morpurgo house, named for Annselm and Helga Morpurgo, the sisters who had lived in it, fought over it, and let it disintegrate over decades.
  • What she could possibly give her husband as a 25th wedding anniversary present was on Yusi Gurrera’s mind about a year and a half ago when she came up with a perfect solution. She would ask a friend who is a sculptor, James Grashow, who lives in Connecticut, to create something that would epitomize her husband’s main interest — fish.
  • Do you ever dream of an old-fashioned beach house? A house with casual imperfection, simplicity, and no worry about sunscreen staining a custom sofa’s imported fabric? A house where you sit anywhere, put anything down wherever you want, sweep the floor with ease, and head to the beach? In East Hampton such a house, if you could find one, would be a rarity.

Blogs by this author: