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  • When Robert and Jeanette Schwagerl purchased the house on Quail Hill in Amagansett in 1989, it had been for the most part abandoned. “I was going to tear it down,” Mr. Schwagerl said during a recent tour. Within a year, he had designed a new house and hired Ed Hollander, a landscape architect, to plan the grounds.

  • It’s not every day that a single four-bedroom house will reflect the history of a village, especially not a village with as multifarious a background as Sag Harbor’s.

    Yet consider the Hampton Street residence of Carl Hribar and Ki Hackney. For starters, there’s the best-guess date of its construction, 1790, when Sag Harbor was a bustling port and an important New York, well, almost-city.

  • Richard Udice uses only red ornaments. A designer who loves Christmas, Mr. Udice decorates C. Whitmore’s Gardens every year and helps the shop’s clients choose flowers, accessories, and even clothing for the holidays.

  • Wreaths - circles of wintertime greens with their sharp, bright balsam smells, or vines wound into circles and braided with flowers or herbs - are symbolic of the circle of the year, the turn from darkness to light, the strength of life overcoming the forces of winter, of victory and celebration.

    While once worn as crowns, wreaths evolved to become hangings for doors — used in Europe, reportedly, to identify particular houses, like house numbers do today - and as decorations marking the harvest and holiday seasons.

  • On my very first Christmas out of my parents' house, I decided to have my own, live, Christmas tree. I had been collecting ornaments over the years, mainly on trips, so I actually had a small box of them set aside for the small spruce I eventually lugged home.

    My grandmother, who lived on Shelter Island, believed in tradition. She didn't like Christmas trees with nothing but new ornaments, like the ones I had bought in Las Vegas and Toronto.

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    For those of a certain age — perhaps 12 and up — Christmas may be more about nostalgia than the anticipation of tearing colorful wrappings off what Santa delivered amidst a long winter’s nap. Homesick, wistful, reflective, melancholy —  emotions like these are common at this time of year in those who are no longer children.

  • At a highly anticipated estate sale in Sagaponack this weekend, bargain and memento hunters had a chance to buy items belonging to Peter Matthiessen, the prominent author and environmentalist, who died in April.
  • It can be a Herculean task to clear out a business after 33 years, but that is what Bebe and Warren Johnson did last week as they said goodbye to the Race Lane storefront of Pritam & Eames to begin a semi-retirement based online and in a new showroom on Mount Desert Island, Me.

  • Sag Harbor's Main Street turned into the Pumpkin Trail on Halloween, while children of all ages went store to store trick-or-treating.

  • Attendees at the East Hampton Town Senior Citizens Center got in on the fun.

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  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The East Hampton Fire Department kicked off Fire Prevention Week with an open house at its headquarters on Cedar Street on Sunday. Kids got a chance to check out some of the trucks and see what it's like to be firefighters.

    This weekend, several other fire departments will host the community as well.

    Amagansett's open house takes place on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • “White Hot + Blue” was the theme of this year’s LongHouse Reserve’s benefit in East Hampton on Saturday and the grounds and guests were done up just right.

  • Anyone traveling by the Schenck gas depot on Newtown Lane on Friday may have thought they were in Williamsburg for a moment as William Quigley, Ben Moon, and Alexander George McCue brought a very Brooklyn vibe to their “Mash-Up Society,” an art show and party held in Mr. Quigley’s studio space in a garage on the property. 

  • Those looking for a lovely spring stroll through some of the most exclusive private gardens in Southampton Village had a treat on Sunday during the garden tour portion of the Parrish Art Museum’s Landscape Pleasures weekend.

    On Saturday, guests heard talks by Chip Callaway, Martin Filler, and Arne Maynard.

  • The South Fork and, more specifically, East Hampton have a long history of inspiring innovation in arts and letters. As artists and writers visited and then stayed for the light, scenery, and bucolic calm, culinary artists were also attracted to the same features as well as the fresh produce and seafood that defined the region’s cuisine.

  •      Hopes and excitement ran even higher this year for the Guild Hall members show, an annual event that brings the South Fork artistic community together for one of the largest exhibitions in the region and the only non-juried show. More than 470 artists submitted work to be placed on the walls of Guild Hall’s three main galleries with the hope of being recognized by Robert Storr, a former curator at the Museum of Modern Art and the dean of the Yale School of Art.