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  • A beautiful waterfront house on a bluff in Springs may be an unlikely place for a museum, but suspend your disbelief. This is no archive of ancient artifacts nor a paean to priceless paintings. No, this is the Museum of Low Taste, or MOLT, a good-humored and astonishingly expansive assemblage of midcentury kitsch — ceramic figurines, lazy susans, and commemorative items, among other things — a proud and highly concentrated collection that numbers in the thousands.
  • An East Hampton house with views of Hook Pond from almost every room is nestled on a preserved 1.78-acre site with 328 feet of pond frontage. Designed by the dean of local architects, Alfred Scheffer, and reconfigured so that it now flows into four sections, the house was built in the mid-1950s for the Right Rev. Austin Pardue, the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh, and his wife, Dorothy Klotz Pardue, a former nationally ranked tennis player. The Bishop’s Cottage, a one-room building he used as a writing studio, is still there.
  • When Bryan Hunt was looking for somewhere to live on the East End in 1991, a friend suggested he call David Porter, an artist who also happened to be a real estate broker. The idea was that Porter would understand Mr. Hunt’s sensibility, and he did.
  • New developers purchased the dilapidated house at 6 Union Street for more than a million dollars than what it was purchased for at auction a year ago.
  • A kaleidoscope of color: white, yellow, salmon, orange, red, purple, and every shade of pink imaginable in an East Hampton garden.
  • The late Francis Fleetwood was on Forbes magazine’s 2001 list of leading architects, which called him “the architect for the A-list in the Hamptons.” He believed the shingle style was the truly indigenous architecture of the United States. Among the 200 shingled, sprawling houses he designed, one on Georgica Pond had 14 bathrooms within its 25,000 square feet. But he also renovated a tiny, felicitously situated, 500-square foot, artist’s studio for a friend.
  • It was the 1980s. America had an actor for a president, and in Japan the wartime emperor-god had morphed into a mild-mannered marine biologist. President Reagan promised it was “morning in America,” but the economic sun was really rising in the Far East. Japan enjoyed a booming economy, lifetime employment, and plenty of money. Sushi was routinely sprinkled with gold leaf, and a corner of land in Tokyo’s Ginza district was worth more than all of California.
  • Way out on Napeague, tucked in on the lee of a dune where the winds off the ocean have to make a U-turn to get at it, there’s a flowering oasis that has no business being there.
  • What might be called a museum of outsider art, hidden on Hog Creek Road in Springs, was once a dairy barn, an Abstract Expressionist’s studio, and the original home of the Springs Fire Department. The monument is easy to miss.

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