Author Information

Articles by this author:

  • Awhite, two-story house with a sailboat in the driveway on a quiet East Hampton street gives no clue to the artistry and craftsmanship of its inhabitants. Once inside, however, the creativity of its owners, Abigail and Paul Vogel, is visible everywhere.
  • Most interior designers meticulously arrange their clients’ houses before being photographed, spending hours fluffing pillows, folding towels, and filling each room with vases of freshly cut flowers. But when the camera recently turned on his own house, which is hexagonal and sits on stilts on the oceanfront in Amagansett, David Netto, an interior designer and writer, rearranged not a thing, leaving his bed partly unmade and the contents of his overnight bag strewn about.
  • Well-behaved ghosts haunt East Hampton if you know how to find them. The hand-hewn beams of the village’s oldest houses, for instance, dated by experts to the 1680s, can still be seen, emerging like spectral cartoon characters from white “sheets” of modern plaster.
  • Somewhere in East Hampton Town, in a patch of woods just off a residential road, the last blooming yellow-fringed orchid in New York State emerged last summer from a tangle of dead leaves and fallen branches.

  • Nick Martin is a man in perpetual motion. Before sitting down for a recent interview, Mr. Martin had already had four meetings, two conference calls, and signed a contract for his latest project — all before lunchtime.
  • The graceful, whitish curves of the small ceramic bowls and cups found a gentle illumination while sitting upon a sun-drenched shelf that ran across the windowpanes of the Clay Art Studios of the Hamptons on a recent Thursday afternoon.
  • The diminutive white frame house on Union Street in Sag Harbor is known both as the 1693 house and the “five-times-moved house.” Judith Auchincloss, who purchased it in 2010 from the tennis pro Guillermo Vilas, described it to a recent visitor as “sort of magical.” A real estate broker in New York City who has been a longtime summer resident here, she owned a house in Bridgehampton until 2002.
  • Well, it’s not a shoe box exactly. But Barbarajo Howard’s one-room Montauk condominium certainly is small — officially, 483 square feet, or 683 if you count the balcony deck that runs the entire width of her top-floor apartment in the 30-acre Rough Rider Landing development.
  • How do you live in a house that an architect built and eventually lived in for a time, particularly when the architect had a very specific aesthetic and was famous? According to David and Janellen Gerstein, you tread lightly and make adjustments carefully, leaving most of it intact, down to the furniture.
  • Seen from Cranberry Hole Road, it rears up from the dunescape like a boxy brown whale with peaked flippers. On closer inspection, the large, honey-colored wood box turns out to be part of an idiosyncratic modern house that takes advantage of its site on the edge of a nature preserve in Amagansett.

Blogs by this author: