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  • A beautiful waterfront house on a bluff in Springs may be an unlikely place for a museum, but suspend your disbelief. This is no archive of ancient artifacts nor a paean to priceless paintings. No, this is the Museum of Low Taste, or MOLT, a good-humored and astonishingly expansive assemblage of midcentury kitsch — ceramic figurines, lazy susans, and commemorative items, among other things — a proud and highly concentrated collection that numbers in the thousands.
  • What might be called a museum of outsider art, hidden on Hog Creek Road in Springs, was once a dairy barn, an Abstract Expressionist’s studio, and the original home of the Springs Fire Department. The monument is easy to miss.
  • At a time when teardowns have become so ubiquitous here that everyone knows what is meant, it is a relief to find a sprawling carriage house and stable dating from 1902 that, aside from modest interior renovations and some exterior repairs over the years, is essentially unchanged.
  • As the South Fork is enveloped in autumn’s abundant colors, a recently opened farm stand is offering the fruits of long labor in Bridgehampton’s fertile fields.
  • For as long as the water is warm enough, Priscilla Rattazzi and Chris Whittle keep a fleet of kayaks, paddleboards, and two small sailboats at the edge of Georgica Pond, ready for a jaunt around the pond or a trip across it to the ocean beach in the near distance.
  • Not every old house that gets snapped up on the South Fork is razed to make way for a bigger one. Especially not in Sag Harbor, and especially not the house Alex Matthiessen bought in 2002.
  • The third annual Springs Agricultural Fair at the Ashawagh Hall farmers market last Saturday drew human competitors in vegetable growing and flower arranging, while canines and poultry, aided by their human overseers, vied for recognition as most accomplished in tricks, and prettiest, respectively.

  • The work of Hans Hokanson, the Swedish-born sculptor who lived in East Hampton from 1961 until his death in 1997, is in many notable public and private collections, but a massive work that would be at home in a museum or a sculpture park such as the Storm King Art Center, where his other work is represented, has remained out of view in a secluded East Hampton house for 45 years.
  • It was 1977 when Jane Maynard and her husband, Walter Maynard, went looking for land on which to build a second home. They were shown a 10.7-acre site at the end of a long driveway just off Georgica Road, right in the heart of East Hampton.
  • Craig Socia, who has designed hundreds, if not thousands, of gardens — English country, stylish contemporary, Mediterranean, you name it — began imagining what he would like to do at his own property from the moment he arrived on Accabonac Road in East Hampton in 1999. In the following dozen years or so, he created a compound of three houses, each with an individual garden, while tending an eponymous landscape company.

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