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  • Almost one out of every six people over the age of 65 has fallen at least once in the past three months, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and both the John Jermain Library in Sag Harbor and the East Hampton Library are planning free fall-prevention classes for older adults to reduce that statistic.
  • The Star has received word of the sudden death of Geraldine B. Taylor of East Hampton, 78, while on vacation with her children in Ireland.
  • Lynda Marie Havens-Horn, a former resident of Sag Harbor, died in Salt Lake City on July 20 from metastatic breast cancer, at the home of her son, Father Justin Lawrence Havens, a Christian Orthodox priest.
  • Margaret Zukas, who immigrated to this country with her family when she was 2, died at home in East Hampton on Monday.
  • Linda Washburne Finney of East Hampton died of liver cancer on July 23 at Southampton Hospital.
  • Beatrice Loretta Neill, who grew up in a house on Louse Point Road in Springs and for many years worked in the Bulova watchcase factory in Sag Harbor, died of breast cancer on July 26 at home in Essex Junction, Vt., her family said. She was 72.
  • School's out, and there's no end of things to keep young people busy -- puppet shows for the youngest, theater camps, concerts, computer coding, dance parties, art workshops, magic shows, nature walks. With all that, no kid should ever have to say, "I'm bored."
  • Green Afternoon V, an annual interactive garden installation and performance by the Amanda Selwyn Dance Theatre, will take place Saturday afternoon at 5 p.m. at the residence of the architects Peter Gumpel and Marcia Previti at 230 Old Stone Highway in Springs.
  • Sweet Honey in the Rock, a Grammy-nominated a cappella ensemble rooted in African-American history and culture, will perform at Guild Hall on Saturday evening at 8.
  • Revel in Dimes will bring its original musical blend of rock, jazz, and blues to the terrace of the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill tomorrow evening at 6.

Blogs by this author:

  • While in transit to North Carolina on Sunday, the fishing vessel Rianda S. requested safe harbor in New York from rough seas generated by Hurricane Jose. State Department of Environmental Conservation law enforcement and marine resources staff granted the request, and the boat arrived in Montauk at 4:30 p.m. The vessel was carrying fish caught in federal waters, including an estimated 6,000 pounds of fluke, and requested to land the fish in New York.

    New York's commercial fluke fishery is currently closed, and the entire 6,000-pound landing would have had to be deducted from the state's remaining quota of 40,000 pounds.

  • Drivers on the East End are being asked to go car-free and use more sustainable travel choices on Friday.
  • David Bunn Martine, the director and curator of the Shinnecock Nation Cultural Center and Museum, will conduct four wigwam workshops on the front lawn of the Eastville Community Historical Society Heritage House in Sag Harbor beginning Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mr. Martine, using a combination of traditional and nontraditional materials, will discuss the use of wigwams and their importance to Native American history. The sessions, which will also take place on Sept. 30, Oct. 7, and Oct. 14, cost $10, $5 for children.

    Mr. Martine will also speak about and sign copies of his new book, “No Reservation: New York Contemporary Native American Art Movement,” on Sept. 30 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the heritage house.
     

  • The Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons has a busy Sunday planned. A self-guided shade-garden tour will kick off the day from 9 a.m. to noon. Check-in is at the Bridgehampton Community House’s main auditorium at 9:30 a.m.

    Then at 2 p.m., Ken Druse, the so-called “guru of natural gardening,” according to the The New York Times, and an award-winning author and photographer, will give a lecture for the Paul Karish Seminar on “Shade Gardening in the Age of Climate Change.”

  • Following Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the Jewish Center of the Hamptons has extended an invitation to anyone displaced from their homes in the affected areas to attend High Holy Days services here in East Hampton.
  • With Long Island under a tropical storm watch, several events scheduled over the next few days are being postponed.
  • The Montauk Chamber of Commerce is continuing its search for sponsors for the Fall Festival carousel, which costs $7,000 for two days.
  • The Old Whalers Church will hold its annual yard and bake sale on Saturday, Sept. 16, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Donated items can be dropped off at the church on Wednesday from 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Friday, Sept. 15, from 10 to noon.
  • The forecast is looking good for the East Hampton Fire Department’s annual fireworks display over Main Beach Saturday night. But even if the weather cooperates, the department still needs help to make it a success, as the all-volunteer organization relies on contributions to support its efforts.

    The fireworks will light up the sky around 8:30. In case rain does interfere, the display will go off on Sunday instead.

  • Wednesday is movie night at Indian Wells Beach in Amagansett, where "The Boss Baby" will be screened at 8 as a fund-raiser for the East Hampton Food Pantry.

    Admission is free, but donations would be appreciated. Food and beverages will be available for purchase.

    According to the Internet Movie Database, "The Boss Baby" is a tale of the impact of a new baby's arrival on a family, as told from the less than reliable point of view of Tim, his imaginative 7-year-old brother.