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  •     In the race for the best title of a collection of poems, the Street Press boys are neck and neck. Graham Everett, the founding editor of the press and of its accompanying magazine, has come out with a new one, “An Incomplete Dictionary of Disappearing Things.” One of the poets he publishes, Dan Giancola, The Star’s book reviewer this week, just released “Data Error,” but, better, also wrote “Part Mirth, Part Murder” and “Songs From the Army of the Working Stiffs” (Karma Dog Editions).

  • The Hunt is On
        Tomorrow at 3:30 p.m., children in grades K through 6 have been invited to a monster hunt at the Amagansett Library. The children’s search is sure to take them all through the shelves and many Dewey-decimal destinations.

  • East Hampton

    A 14-year-old East Hampton High School student told police that her brand new Apple iPhone 5, valued at $700, was stolen at the school from her bag on Oct. 9. She had left the bag beneath her locker, unattended, for a half hour.

    East Hampton Village

    Police received a call on Oct. 22 alerting them to the presence of two “protestors” near the Post Office. An officer found two people seated at a table, which had on it political literature. No action was taken.

  •     Howard John Brown, a lifelong resident of East Hampton Town and part of the team that established the Springs Ambulance Company, died at Southampton Hospital on Sept. 18 of complications from myelodysplastic syndrome, formerly known as preleukemia. He was 84 years old.

  •     Tara Loper-Mansir of Springs, a mother of four and the founder of Nana Cares, died on Sunday of cervical cancer. She was 43 years old.
        Born in Southampton on Feb. 24, 1969, to James H. Loper Jr. and the former Kattie R. O’Sullivan, Ms. Loper-Mansir graduated from East Hampton High School in 1988 and from the White Plains, N.Y., Berkeley Business School in 1990. She later attended the State University’s Empire College in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., studying psychology until she was too ill to stay in school.

  •     John Judge, 61, a longtime resident of Amagansett and friend of many in the community, died on Oct. 23 after being struck by a vehicle that did not stop. A story about the hit and run appeared in last week’s issue; police have the incident under investigation.  
        Mr. Judge was an electrician who worked for several people in the hamlet. He had just left Astro Pizza and was crossing the street when he was struck.

  •     Steven Lockier, a lifetime resident of the South Fork, died at Southampton Hospital last Thursday of complications relating to cancer. Mr. Lockier, who was 55, had been sick for four years.

  •     Frances Ferrari, an Italian cook and matriarch of a family that she nurtured not only with selfless care, her family said, but with holiday and everyday meals, died at home in East Hampton on Friday. She was 89.
        Born in Hackensack, N.J., on July 15, 1923, to Anthony Lucente and the former Rose Urato, she graduated from Hackensack High School in 1941.

  • Thursday, November 1
    BOYS SOCCER, first round county Class A tournament, Miller Place at East Hampton, 2:30 p.m.


    Friday, November 2
    GIRLS SWIMMING, East Hampton at League III championship meet, Hauppauge High School, 4:30 p.m.
    FOOTBALL, first round Division IV tournament, East Hampton at Babylon, 7 p.m.


    Saturday, November 3
    GIRLS VOLLEYBALL, county Class B semifinal, East Hampton High School, 10 a.m.

  • Golf Champs
        The following won championships recently at the Sag Harbor Golf Club: Tim Sweeney, men; Robin Corwith, women; Peter Donohue, senior men; Jean Thompson, senior women, and Ray Romano, first flight.
        In addition, Mark Weinhardt was the men’s low qualifier, and John Acquino and Liz Granitz were the president’s cup winners.

Blogs by this author:

  • Suffolk County is holding a photo contest, and County Executive Steve Bellone is asking residents to get involved. 

    All residents have to do is take a picture that depicts why they love calling Suffolk County home and load it to Facebook with the #SuffolkSnapshot. Suggestions include landmarks, tourist attractions, natural resources, and downtowns.

    The contest, Mr. Bellone said, "gives residents a chance to capture that uniqueness and beauty of Suffolk County and share it with their friends and neighbors through Facebook." 

  • School starts next week in East Hampton, but first students — and parents — have orientation meetings.

    On Tuesday night, all parents of East Hampton students in kindergarten through 12th grade are invited to a workshop on how to access online school resources. Two sessions, one in English in the high school library, and one in Spanish in the auditorium, start at 6 p.m.

    Incoming kindergarteners and their families will have an orientation at the John M. Marshall Elementary School on Wednesday at 10 a.m.

  • Saturday's weather means you may have to change your day's plans. 

    The Clamshell Foundation's annual Sandcastle Contest at Atlantic Avenue Beach in Amagansett was canceled for the first time in its 23-year history, according to the announcement posted on the foundation's Facebook page Saturday morning. No rain date was set, so sandcastle builders will have to wait until next year. T-shirts designed by Peter Spacek are still for sale, though. Visit the Clamshell Foundation's website for more information. 

  • This weekend will be the first time that it will be illegal to drink alcoholic beverages during the day at Indian Wells Beach in Amagansett. 

  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration honored Richard G. Hendrickson, a volunteer United States Cooperative weather observer since 1930, for his longstanding service on Sunday.

  • Three Mile Harbor in East Hampton will be temporarily closed to shellfishing from sunrise on Saturday through Wednesday, in anticipation of the annual fireworks show on Saturday, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced on Thursday.