Author Information

Articles by this author:

  •    Claire Reed will celebrate the Feminist Press’s publication of her new memoir, “Toughing It Out: From Silver Slippers to Combat Boots,” with a reading and discussion at the Bluestockings Bookstore on the Lower East Side of Manhattan tomorrow from 7 to 9 p.m.
       Blanche Wiesen Cook of Springs, distinguished professor of history at John Jay College, will also participate, her biography of Eleanor Roosevelt in tow.

  • East Hampton Town

    Calling Wireless Companies
        Hoping to prompt wireless communications companies to expand their coverage, eliminating dead zones in East Hampton, as well as to raise revenue for the town, perhaps, by leasing public sites for antennas and other equipment, the East Hampton Town Board is developing a request for proposals from the industry. Councilwoman Theresa Quigley has been pushing the effort.

  • Amagansett

    Doreen Drohan, a food vendor who took over the old Dune Doggie spot at Indian Wells Beach, told police last week that the Dune Doggie sign had been stolen from her car, which was parked outside a house on Three Mile Harbor Road. The white sign is four feet wide, with “Dune Doggie” written on top and the menu written below.

    East Hampton

  • Hailing Student Art
        A reception for the first part of Guild Hall’s annual Student Art Festival, which opened over the weekend, will be held on Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m., giving students, families, and the public a chance to see work in the galleries and on the John Drew Theater stage by children in kindergarten through eighth grade from schools across the South Fork.

  •     Robert Harold Levenson, who was as famous for his taglines in the golden age of advertising as he was for his roses in East Hampton, died in New York City on Jan. 16. He was 83 and had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
        Mr. Levenson was eulogized in print and blogs in the last week by the advertising industry as a visionary and a generous mentor who told copywriters to imagine they were writing a letter and describing something to an intelligent friend who knew less about the product than they did.

  •     Robert Bruce Anderson Sr., a World War II veteran and descendant of one of East Hampton’s founding families, the Fithians, died on Friday at Southampton Hospital. He was 90 and had lived on Cooper Lane in East Hampton for most of his life.
        He was born on the family homestead on Indian Wells Highway in Amagansett on Jan. 9, 1923, one of 10 children of Herbert Keith Anderson and the former Sybil Rae Fithian. He attended grade school in Amagansett and graduated in East Hampton High School’s class of 1940.

  •     Ethyl C. Comerford, formerly of Noyac, a teacher at the Most Holy Trinity School in East Hampton for many years, died on Jan. 8 at the Fairview, a nursing home in Groton, Conn., where she had lived for the past nine months. Ms. Comerford was 92.

  •     Walter E. Ershow, who flew 23 missions over enemy territory during World War II, died on Jan. 9 at the age of 89. The cause was heart failure, his family said. A part-time resident of East Hampton, he had been in declining health since October.
        Born in Newark, N.J., on Sept. 14, 1923, to David J. Ershowsky and the former Minnie Reinfeld, he grew up in the Weequahic section of the city. He graduated from Weequahic High School and then attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

  •     James Albert Christensen of Laurel Trail in Sag Harbor, a 91-year old World War II Veteran, died at the Hamptons Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing in Southampton on Jan. 14, seven weeks after suffering a brain hemorrhage.
        Born on Sept. 25, 1921 in Carrollton, Mich. to the former Iva King and Albert Christensen, Mr. Christensen grew up in Saginaw, Mich., where he graduated from St. Andrew’s High School. While there, he served on the Eucharistic committee, English club, Sodality fellowship, and was a member of the football team.

  •     James H. O’Connell of Bayberry Lane on North Haven, who appeared in numerous community theater productions and was an active member of the Sag Harbor Knights of Columbus and  a lector at St. Andrew’s Catholic Church in Sag Harbor, died of pneumonia at Southampton Hospital on New Year’s Day. He was 99.
        Mr. O’Connell had retired from Met Life in 1978, where he had a 44-year career as an underwriter and in marketing.

Blogs by this author:

  • Friday is the final day of the WPPB spring pledge drive, and the sole National Public Radio-affiliated station based on Long Island has taken to YouTube to extend its pitch. Geir Magnusson, a videomaker and commercial photographer, prepared the short spot, which features a number of the WPPB hosts.

  • For the first time in 16 years, the Bridgehampton boys are heading back to Glens Falls for a chance at a state basketball championship. 

    The Bees easily won the New York State southeastern Class D regional game, pouncing on Livingston Manor, from Sullivan County, 60-39 Friday evening at Suffolk Community College in Selden. 

  • The annual Empty Bowls event benefiting the Springs Seedlings Project happens on Sunday from noon to 3 p.m. at the American Legion. Guests who have been invited to bring their own bowls, large or small, can sampele soups prepared by 28 chefs. Bowls will be provided by those arriving without one. Guests can take soups to go as well. 

    The event also includes raffles and baked goods. Admission is $12, $5 for children 13 and under. Kids under 5 will be admitted free. 

  • The annual fund-raiser for the Kendall Madison Foundation happens Friday night at 8 at the Stephen Talkhouse. The $20 donation funds the Kendall Madison Scholarship Fund, established in 1995 in memory of a popular student athlete who died that year at the age of 21. 

    In addition to the scholarship, the foundation provides financial assistance to those in need and helps to fund the Kendall Madison Fitness Center at East Hampton High School. 

  • With a winter storm warning in effect for the East End through Thursday evening, many are keeping their doors closed for the day.

  • The Bargain Box and Bargain Books, the thrift shops at the Ladies Village Improvement Society in East Hampton, will reopen on Tuesday at 10 a.m. after a monthlong hiatus. 

    The shops, all gussied up for spring, will celebrate the season ahead with a raffle this week. When a customer makes a purchase, he or she will be entered in a raffle for a $50 voucher for a future shopping spree at the L.V.I.S. The drawing will be on Saturday at 4 p.m.

  • Bridgehampton beat Stony Brook 54-36 in the county Class C-D championship game at William Floyd High School on Saturday afternoon.

    The Bees may have gone into the game a little overconfident, according to their coach, Carl Johnson, because two of Stony Brook's best players were benched, including the point guard, who sat out with an injury. Nevertheless, Stony Brook kept up with Bridgehampton in the first half, waiting until the last few seconds on the clock during each possession to get off a shot. The Bees led 19-14 at the half.

  • Harborfields High School defeated the East Hampton High School boys basketball team in the county Class A semifinal game on Friday.

    The second-seeded Tornadoes prevailed 73-58 at home against the third-seeded Bonackers to qualify for the championship game on Tuesday at Walt Whitman High School in Huntington Station. 

  • A fire chief responding to an automatic fire alarm call at a house in Bridgehampton on Sunday morning smelled smoke, called for engines to respond, and then discovered flames that firefighters were able to quickly extinguish.

    The Bridgehampton Fire Department was called to a house on Job’s Lane, near Pointe Mecox Lane, at about 9:50 a.m. Mark Balserus, the second assistant fire chief, reported a strong smell of smoke at the house and had dispatchers alert the rest of the department about a fire at about 10:10 a.m.

  • Valentine's Day is Saturday, and before you start with the excuse that there's nothing happening in the Hamptons in the dead of winter, take a look at these ideas for spending time with your valentine. Even if you are sans date this year, the weekend's line-up is sure to keep your heart happy.