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  • Nina Capilets, who spent many summers living near Gardiner’s Bay in Amagansett, died shortly after a massive stroke on Dec. 20 in Naples, Fla. She was 89.
        One of her five daughters, Corrine Capilets of Amagansett, said yesterday that her mother held on after the stroke until all of her daughters arrived in Florida and gathered together with her, when she died peacefully.

  •     Richard I. Mark of East Hollow Road, East Hampton, and New York City died at home in Manhattan on Dec. 17 of congestive heart failure. He was 80.
        Mr. Mark had been a tax lawyer and partner, first at KPMG and later at First Manhattan Company, an investment advisory firm, both in New York City.

  •     Beate Sirota Gordon, the author of the key women’s rights aspects in the post-war Japanese Constitution, died of pancreatic cancer at home in Manhattan on Dec. 30. She was 89.
        Ms. Gordon, who had summered in Amagansett since about 1990, was attracted to the South Fork by its art scene. “She had dear friends in the arts community,” her grandson Sam Gordon said.

  •     Through her active roles in the Bridgehampton community and with riding and racing of horses and her charitable work, Lynn Dart Wesnofske touched the lives of many people. Ms. Wesnofske, of Brick Kiln Road in Bridgehampton, died on Dec. 26 at Stony Brook Hospital from complications from pneumonia. She was 71.

  •     Juana Maria Bahamondes-Castro of Queens Lane, East Hampton, died at Southampton Hospital on Dec. 11 after a yearlong illness. She was 77, having been born in Las Cabras, Chile, on June 12, 1935.
        Born to Abraham Castro and Rufina Donoso, Ms. Bahamondes-Castro was one of 12 children, all of whom immigrated to this country.
        She was married to Jose Bahamondes, who survives, and had enjoyed life as a parent and homemaker.

  •     Ruth Ratcliffe, who loved everything about the Sag Harbor area and never wanted to leave, her family said, died at home on North Haven on Dec. 23. She was 91 and had lived there for 56 years.
        Born in Brooklyn on April 22, 1921, to Henry and Rose Stampfl Bornkamp, she was very close to her only sibling, Robert Bornkamp, who died in 2011.
        She married Robert Ratcliffe in the fall of 1941. During World War II, Ms. Ratcliffe was a true Rosie the Riveter, working as an aircraft riveter.

  •     Elizabeth Marie Dragotta, a lifelong resident of Amagansett and East Hampton, died on Sunday while vacationing with her family in Palm Beach Shores, Fla. She was 74 and had been ill for some time.

  •     Louise Turissini, who lived in Noyac year-round from 1968 to 1995, died on Dec. 24 in Indianapolis. She was 96.
        Ms. Turissini began visiting Noyac in 1947 with her husband, Dan Turissini. In 1968, they became full-time residents. After he died, she lived there until 1995, when she went to live with family. While living in Noyac, she was a member of the Sag Harbor Columbiettes, a Catholic women’s organization.

  •     Irene Dynenson Steinman lived through one of the 20th century’s darkest times. The longtime resident of the Northwest area of East Hampton died on Nov. 30 in West Nyack, N.Y. She was 85.
        She was born in Lodz, Poland, in 1927. In 1941, her family fled the invading German army for Russian-controlled territory, where they obtained visas from Chiune Sugihara, Japanese diplomat to Lithuania. Sugihara is credited with saving the lives of thousands of Jews by way of the travel visas he issued.

  •     There will be a funeral service at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church for Sandra Cantey, a Wooded Oak Lane,  East Hampton, resident who died on Friday at Southampton Hospital.
        An obituary will appear in a future issue.

Blogs by this author:

  • Friday is the final day of the WPPB spring pledge drive, and the sole National Public Radio-affiliated station based on Long Island has taken to YouTube to extend its pitch. Geir Magnusson, a videomaker and commercial photographer, prepared the short spot, which features a number of the WPPB hosts.

  • For the first time in 16 years, the Bridgehampton boys are heading back to Glens Falls for a chance at a state basketball championship. 

    The Bees easily won the New York State southeastern Class D regional game, pouncing on Livingston Manor, from Sullivan County, 60-39 Friday evening at Suffolk Community College in Selden. 

  • The annual Empty Bowls event benefiting the Springs Seedlings Project happens on Sunday from noon to 3 p.m. at the American Legion. Guests who have been invited to bring their own bowls, large or small, can sampele soups prepared by 28 chefs. Bowls will be provided by those arriving without one. Guests can take soups to go as well. 

    The event also includes raffles and baked goods. Admission is $12, $5 for children 13 and under. Kids under 5 will be admitted free. 

  • The annual fund-raiser for the Kendall Madison Foundation happens Friday night at 8 at the Stephen Talkhouse. The $20 donation funds the Kendall Madison Scholarship Fund, established in 1995 in memory of a popular student athlete who died that year at the age of 21. 

    In addition to the scholarship, the foundation provides financial assistance to those in need and helps to fund the Kendall Madison Fitness Center at East Hampton High School. 

  • With a winter storm warning in effect for the East End through Thursday evening, many are keeping their doors closed for the day.

  • The Bargain Box and Bargain Books, the thrift shops at the Ladies Village Improvement Society in East Hampton, will reopen on Tuesday at 10 a.m. after a monthlong hiatus. 

    The shops, all gussied up for spring, will celebrate the season ahead with a raffle this week. When a customer makes a purchase, he or she will be entered in a raffle for a $50 voucher for a future shopping spree at the L.V.I.S. The drawing will be on Saturday at 4 p.m.

  • Bridgehampton beat Stony Brook 54-36 in the county Class C-D championship game at William Floyd High School on Saturday afternoon.

    The Bees may have gone into the game a little overconfident, according to their coach, Carl Johnson, because two of Stony Brook's best players were benched, including the point guard, who sat out with an injury. Nevertheless, Stony Brook kept up with Bridgehampton in the first half, waiting until the last few seconds on the clock during each possession to get off a shot. The Bees led 19-14 at the half.

  • Harborfields High School defeated the East Hampton High School boys basketball team in the county Class A semifinal game on Friday.

    The second-seeded Tornadoes prevailed 73-58 at home against the third-seeded Bonackers to qualify for the championship game on Tuesday at Walt Whitman High School in Huntington Station. 

  • A fire chief responding to an automatic fire alarm call at a house in Bridgehampton on Sunday morning smelled smoke, called for engines to respond, and then discovered flames that firefighters were able to quickly extinguish.

    The Bridgehampton Fire Department was called to a house on Job’s Lane, near Pointe Mecox Lane, at about 9:50 a.m. Mark Balserus, the second assistant fire chief, reported a strong smell of smoke at the house and had dispatchers alert the rest of the department about a fire at about 10:10 a.m.

  • Valentine's Day is Saturday, and before you start with the excuse that there's nothing happening in the Hamptons in the dead of winter, take a look at these ideas for spending time with your valentine. Even if you are sans date this year, the weekend's line-up is sure to keep your heart happy.