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  •     East Hampton Village police yesterday announced the arrest of a man alleged to have defaced public property with anti-Barack Obama graffiti over the last four months. Recently, the graffiti became overtly racial in nature. Lawrence G. Nickel, 63, of East Hampton was charged with one felony count of criminal mischief, 12 misdemeanor counts of making graffiti, and one misdemeanor count of petty larceny.

  •     Sag Harbor has been missing a village trustee since the August resignation of Timothy Culver, and Mayor Brian Gilbride does not plan to appoint someone to fill his seat, preferring that the public choose someone at the next election.
        At the board’s last meeting there were only three members present. Dr. Robby Stein was absent, having been injured in a bicycle accident on Suffolk Street.

  • Feeding Time at Sofo

  • Amagansett

    Chini Alarco of Whitmore’s Garden Shop and Nursery reported several items stolen from an outdoor display area, including an outdoor shower worth $600 and two duffel bags, valued at $99 each. Several smaller items were taken as well. That happened before Sept. 5, and last week two rare shrubs, valued at $500, were taken from the same nursery.

    East Hampton

  • Southampton Town

    Southampton Town Grants
        Applications are now available for certified 501(c)3 organizations to apply for annual grants from the Town of Southampton. Human services grants assist organizations that help people obtain employment, counseling, psychotherapy, health care, child care, and educational services. Cultural arts and recreational grants mainly assist organizations that encourage visual or performing arts and recreational programs.

  •     Luigi Pavia, who grew up on Squaw Road in East Hampton and attended the Springs School and East Hampton High School, died on Saturday in New York City. The cause had not been determined, his family said. He was 44.
        Mr. Pavia was a son of Natalie Edgar, a painter, who survives, and the late Philip Pavia, a sculptor who was a strong force in the midcentury avant-garde art scene in New York.

  •     Richard Michael Edelstein of East Hampton, 47, who managed several restaurants and other establishments on the South Fork over the past 20 years, died at Southampton Hospital on Sept. 7. A sister, Marcia Darrow of Pelham, N.Y., said he had had a heart attack at work.
        Mr. Edelstein was born in Manhattan on Dec. 15, 1964, to Harvey Edelstein and the former Ruth Salzberg. Two years later, they moved to Montauk full time. Mr. Edelstein graduated from the Montauk School and, in 1983, from East Hampton High School.

  •     Frances Taylor (Fran) Berg was a founding member of the Montauk Point Sun, Surf, and Wave Worshipers Association formed, tongue-in-cheek, in 1976. Members called themselves Pointers, and “worshipped” in the sandy cove east of Ditch Plain. According to their decree, “we shall consider anything else beside the Point.”

  •     Music was everything to Gregg Lee Rickards, an Amagansett resident who died on Aug. 29 of a recurrence of cancer that he had first been diagnosed with seven years earlier.
        Mr. Rickards played bass, both electric and stand-up, since his years at East Hampton High School, where he was in the orchestra and jazz band. He had discovered his love for playing after receiving a guitar as a Christmas present when he was in the eighth grade.

  •     Betty Nugent Cook, a former resident of East Hampton, where she was a member of the Ramblers, the Ladies Village Improvement Society, and the South Fork Country Club, died on Sept. 14 at Eastern Long Island Hospital in Greenport. She was 95.
        Ms. Cook had lived at Peconic Landing in Greenport since 2002, but enjoyed reunions with her friends from years past. She was active in the community in her younger years and belonged to the American Association of University Women as well as the East Hampton Presbyterian Church.

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  • With students heading back to school after a hiatus because of the storm, school sports are also getting back on track.

    Joseph Vasile-Cozzo, the athletic director at East Hampton School District, said the boys and girls basketball games originally scheduled for Thursday have been rescheduled for Monday. The varsity teams will play at the high school, with the girls slated to play at 5 p.m., and the boys playing at 6:15 p.m. The junior varsity teams will play at the middle school at the same start times. 

  • During the blizzard, East Hampton Town and Village officials are standing by to help, and here's a list of important phone numbers to keep handy. As you prepare for the storm, why not print this out?

    Emergency Numbers:

    The joint town and village Emergency Operations Center, which will field calls about storm-related issues, has two numbers, one for village residents and one for town residents. Village residents should call 631-907-9796, and town residents should call 631-907-9743. Emergency line remains 911. 

  • As the South Fork braces for the blizzard on Monday, we are beginning to learn of school cancellations and business closures. We will keep a running list below, but we'll need your help. Please email us announcements and information to TKV@ehstar.com to announce a meeting that has been canceled or to let your customers know you are closing early.

  • On Monday Martin Luther King's Birthday will be celebrated, and there are several observations planned on the South Fork this weekend and on Monday.

    Jack Hill, the dean of world languages and literature at the Ross School, will discuss the work of  Dr. King at Canio's Books in Sag Harbor on Saturday at 5 p.m. "The Legacy of Dr. King and Why King Still Matters" will cover his historical significance, his 1963 "Letter From Birmingham Jail," and the continuing importance of a nonviolent fight against injustice. 

  • The Ellen Hermanson Foundation, which has raised money for breast cancer research and education for two decades now, recently donated $295,000 to fund technology and patient support services for Southampton Hospital's Ellen Hermanson Breast Center.

  • As you're cleaning house after the holidays, not everything needs to be chucked.

    The East Hampton Library will take those holiday greeting cards that arrived via the postal service. Foldable cards will be used for a craft project on Jan. 24 at 3:30 p.m., when teenagers will make little boxes out of them, according Lisa Houston, a librarian. 

  • Hailing the Solstice
    All have been invited to a winter solstice celebration at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the South Fork meetinghouse on the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike Saturday at 7 p.m. The gathering will begin with a potluck supper, and those planning to share have been asked to prepare a dish with a generous six portions. A candlelight ceremony will follow, with drumming, dancing, and music.

    A suggested donation of $10 for each adult will go to local food pantries and also benefit the meetinghouse.

  • "Paintings of Hope," an exhibition of work by Haim Mizrahi, an East Hampton artist, will open at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday at 6 p.m. The evening will include a candle lighting and songs with Chabad of East Hampton in celebration of the fifth night of Hanukkah.

  • A holiday concert at Ashawagh Hall Thursday evening will feature Caroline Doctorow performing with Russ Seeger, and the Job Potter and Friends band, with musicians to include Gerry Giliberti, Sarah Greene, and Randy Parsons.

    In store are folk, blues, and country music, including original songs, as well as holiday classics. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free.

  • There's one more chance before the holiday season to give the gift of a blood donation.