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  • Tree Lighting and Treats

    Food will be a part of holiday festivities at two local restaurants this weekend.

    Tomorrow at 7:30 p.m., the Topping Rose House in Bridgehamtpon will serve hot chocolate, hot toddies, mulled wine, and Christmas cookies during a tree-lighting ceremony. Children from the Our Lady of the Hamptons school will sing carols.

    On Sunday, after a tree-lighting event at c/o the Maidstone inn in East Hampton, the Living Room restaurant there will offer a Swedish holiday dinner menu for $42 per person.

  • The process of gaining town approval to put up an agricultural building on farmland would be simplified under a proposed revision to the East Hampton Town code that will be the subject of a hearing before the town board next Thursday.

    At present, the law requires review by the town planning and agricultural review boards, as well as approval of the town board for buildings or other structures on farmland over which the town holds development rights.

    Under the proposed change, town board approval would not be required.

  • East Hampton Town

    Accolades for Financial Reporting

    East Hampton Town has received an award from the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada for the quality of its annual financial report.

  • The town board voted last Thursday to move ahead with three property purchases using the community preservation fund, following hearings on the deals.

    Three lots on Cranberry Hole Road in Amagansett totaling 2.6 acres will be purchased for $2.2 million. They are owned by Helen S. Rattray, the Star’s publisher, the Sky and Ray Family Trust, and Indian Pot L.L.C.

  • Members of East Hampton Town’s litter and energy sustainability committees supported the town board’s proposed ban on plastic shopping bags at a hearing last week, citing the resources used in their manufacture and the bags’ persistence in the environment.
  • The state issued an initial finding this week that no further review would be required, but is accepting public comment.
  • Holidays at Harbor Grill

    The Harbor Grill in East Hampton is once again offering a deal for those who purchase restaurant gift cards for the holidays. For every $50 gift card, the purchaser will receive an additional card worth $10; for every $200 gift card, a $50 gift card will be issued as well. The offer will be good until Jan. 1.

    Book on Sweets

  • Wreaths - circles of wintertime greens with their sharp, bright balsam smells, or vines wound into circles and braided with flowers or herbs - are symbolic of the circle of the year, the turn from darkness to light, the strength of life overcoming the forces of winter, of victory and celebration.

    While once worn as crowns, wreaths evolved to become hangings for doors — used in Europe, reportedly, to identify particular houses, like house numbers do today - and as decorations marking the harvest and holiday seasons.

  • Two East Hampton residents who gathered more than 500 signatures of support for restrictions at the East Hampton Airport to reduce aircraft noise have drafted a list of recommended airport rules for presentation to the public and the town board, and have hired their own prominent law firm to bolster their case.
  • East Hampton Town’s community housing opportunity fund committee has assessed affordable housing needs here and recommended housing initiatives to the town board on Tuesday after presenting its report.

Blogs by this author:

  • A hearing on the purchase of two parcels in Amagansett will be held at East Hampton Town Hall on Thursday night.
  • A ceremony to dedicate a dogwood tree and plaque commemorating Anna Mirabai Lytton, a 14-year old Springs girl who died three years ago after being struck by a car, took place on Wednesday in East Hampton Village.
  • A New York State training program in “citizens’ preparedness,” designed to provide information and tools to help residents prepare for and respond to emergencies and to recover from them as quickly as possible, will be presented on March 22 at the East Hampton Village Emergency Services Building on Cedar Street, from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • Consultants who will help East Hampton Town develop plans for the nonresidential areas of each of the town's hamlets will hold meetings next week to hear the public's thoughts and concerns.
  • Plans for future energy generation on the East End to meet growing power needs are on the Long Island Power Authority's agenda, with key decisions to be made this spring, and renewable energy advocates are urging residents to speak out at a LIPA board of trustees meeting on Wednesday.
  • A group called Montauk Locals is urging concerned residents to gather at the Montauk Firehouse at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday to greet the East Hampton Town Board, which will be having a 10 a.m. meeting there.
  • The East Hampton Town Board voted unanimously on Tuesday night to enact an overnight curfew at East Hampton Airport, from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., and to extend that curfew from 8 p.m. to 9 a.m. for planes that fall into a "noisy aircraft" category.
  • An electric-vehicle charging station, newly installed at East Hampton Town Hall, will be unveiled at 9 a.m. Friday at an event sponsored by the town board and the Natural Resources Department. The public has been invited.

    The station is in front of the police annex at the town hall campus on Pantigo Road. It use will be demonstrated, using electric vehicles provided by Buzz Chew Chevrolet and Tesla Motors, whose representatives will be on hand to answer technical questions.

  • East Hampton Town will provide trash bags and gloves to volunteers pitching in on Saturday for the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup Day.

    Individuals and groups have been invited to collect trash on any beach. Participants will be asked to fill out an Ocean Conservancy data collection form, which the town will provide, to record the type of debris found. The information will be used by the organization to identify debris “hotspots” and issues, raise awareness, and help communities adopt policies that will contribute to cleaner oceans.

  •      A dynamic trio of East End songstresses, Nancy Atlas, Caroline Doctorow, and Inda Eaton, rocked a sold-out Bay Street Theatre on Saturday night for "Way Out East," the East Coast precursor to an upcoming mini-tour out west.