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  • 1770 House Tavern
    143 Main Street
    East Hampton
    324-1770
    Dinner nightly

  • Turnip Gratin
        This recipe is from Richard Olney’s “Ten Vineyard Lunches.” He doesn’t really give detailed recipes. I would suggest two to four tablespoons butter for this.
        Serves four.

    2 lbs. small crisp turnips
    Salt
    Unsalted butter
    About 11/2 cups semi-fresh breadcrumbs
    About 1/4 cup heavy cream

  •     I know very little about food and wine pairing but am an eager student. I appreciate meals moistened with wine chosen by a friend in the know. But I also agree with Richard Olney’s philosophy that “it is a mistake to freeze such a variable and seductive landscape with rigid rules.”

  • Roasted Toast
        This recipe was invented by my genius cooking friend Tommy. I make it over and over, just so I can tell guests the name.
        Serves eight or more.
    1 loaf of Tuscan bread, or sourdough, or other round loaf
    4 oz. softened butter
    1/4 cup olive oil
    4 cloves garlic, minced
    2 Tbsp. Italian herb mixture (oregano, basil, thyme, whatever)
    1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1/2 tsp. red pepper flakes

  •     I have now had my little camp at Lazy Point for five years. Five years, long enough for the clams in my secret clam bed to mature and become sustenance. Long enough for me to learn what I need and don’t need to make time spent out there worthwhile, restorative, contemplative.

  •     These recipes are from Kevin West’s “Saving the Season.”

    Corn Relish
        Makes six pint jars.
    12 ears corn
    1 large red bell pepper, roasted, skinned, and seeded
    3 jalapenos, roasted and skinned
    1/2 lb. red onions
    2 fat cloves garlic
    2 tsp. cumin seeds
    1 tsp. coriander seeds
    31/2 cups apple cider vinegar, or more if needed
    1 cup water
    1 Tbsp. kosher salt
    3 Tbsp. sugar

  •    W­hy pickle, can, and preserve? The best reason is because of where we live. The bounty of fruits and vegetables available to us makes the effort worthwhile. It is also satisfying and economical. And the little jars of what you have made make swell gifts.

  •    Last year, my brothers and I sold our family home: a little 100-year-old pink stucco house at the end of a road, surrounded by a golf course and water. Exquisite. It was a painful time whose time had come. I was ready for a little “city living,” having neighbors close by, restaurants that stayed open year round, and no pop-up shops for twerking tweens. (Sorry, East Hampton Village, but you have become dismal in winter and downright silly in summer.) I made plans to move to Sag Harbor.

  • Pan-Seared Swordfsh With Black Olives and Cherry Tomatoes
        This recipe is just a guideline, feel free to play with it.
    Serves four.
    1 lb. thick-sliced swordfish, belly is good
    1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
    1/2 cup pitted and chopped kalamata olives
    1/2 cup each chopped fresh basil and parsley
    1 lemon, 1/2 cut into thin rings and seeded, the other half for squeezing juice at end of cooking
    2 Tbsp. olive oil
    Salt and pepper to taste

  •     Swordfish are found around the world in tropical, temperate, and sometimes cold waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. North Atlantic swordfish annually migrate thousands of miles along the eastern seaboard of the United States and Canada. They are one of the fastest and largest predators in the ocean, capable of swimming up to 50 miles per hour, thanks to their beautifully streamlined bodies.

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