It is colorful foliage, fruits, and berries that we look to for a stunning climax to the gardening year
Enkianthus perulatus J.L. Pennock Abby Jane Brody Photos
The fragrant flowers of false holly, Osmanthus hererophyllus
Coral bark maple
Kousa dogwood fruit

Bush clover, particularly in sun, begins to flower in mid-August and continues into October
White bush clover

The importance of protecting trees from the north and northwest with windbreaks
Hybrids named after Indian tribes, such as Hopi, are the crape myrtles most adaptable to the East End. Abby Jane Brody
The red crape myrtles are dramatic but do not fare well over our winters, as seen in the die-back in this one. Abby Jane Brody

The Garden Club of East Hampton has been playing with plants at the Mimi Meehan Native Plant Garden
A mosaic of butterfly weed, above, offers pops of orange and yellow in the grounds behind Clinton Academy. Below, a sea of Incrediball hydrangeas were another winner this year. Abby Jane Brody Photos
New hybrid coneflowers, Cheyenne Spirit. Abby Jane Brody Photos
Spikes of Scutellaria incana
Very late flowering plum leaf azalea

Selecting clematis is nearly as daunting as narrowing down which roses, hostas, or day lilies you want
Clematis is a resilient but easy plant that flowers for a long period and is pretty as well. Examples are the workhorse C. Etoile Violette, above, and, below, two versions of Clematis Prince Charles. Abby Jane Brody Photos

Word began leaking out that there were ever-blooming roses at the garden that were gorgeous, highly disease-resistant, and often fragrant
The pink climber Jasmina rose features “large cupped flowers and lots of them throughout the summer, with a light fruity scent.” Justin Spring

The beauty and flexibility of monochromatic plant combinations
Yellow gazania with wooly silver sage and dichondra Durell Godfrey

The LongHouse Reserve held its seventh “ON+OFF the ground” exhibit
LongHouse Reserve’s Planters On+ Off the Ground competition and exhibit had many entrants, including, above, “Excavated” by Toni Ross and Tony Piazza, which won a first-place ribbon; “The Healing Chest”, below, by Summerhill Landscapes in Sag Harbor, which won the people’s choice award. Britta Lokting Photos
“Kenny Keyser” by Cottage Gardens Landscaping.
“Splattered” from Unlimited Earthcare by Frederico Azevedo.

The annual garden sale and celebration, Much Ado About Madoo
Robert Dash’s untitled oil-and-gesso painting on lithograph from his “Sagg Main” series will be part of the Much Ado About Madoo live auction tomorrow night, carrying an estimate of $10,000. Gary Mamay

Last summer I was obsessing over the purple-leaved redbud Cercis canadensis Forest Pansy
Forest Pansy in mid-May Abby Jane Brody