Habitat

A contemporary North Haven house departs from the norms
A sculpture of horses by Robert L. Hooke, an artist who lives in Sag Harbor, welcomes visitors to Susan Goldstein’s North Haven house. Her daughter is a professional equestrian. Durell Godfrey
A dramatic dining table was fashioned from two ancient cherry trees that were ready to fall. A glass wall of water creates soothing sounds and divides the living room into two seating areas.
The fixtures in a bathroom and its counter reflect distinctive taste. Custom-fabricated corner windows provide dramatic views while helping lower the cost of heating and cooling.Durell Godfrey photos
Projecting balconies and strong horizontal volumes bring Frank Lloyd Wright to mind. A dramatic, three-story rotunda is the axis of the house; the balcony leads to the bedrooms.Durell Godfrey photos
A fieldstone wall and tables using wood from the property’s cherry trees bring rusticity into the living room. The stair treads were also fabricated from the trees.Durell Godfey Photos

Did Anne Boleyn take shelter under these beams?
A birdhouse marks the view of the Tiedemanns’ house from the south.
Left, the “bones” of a 500-year-old barn come from the Boleyn family’s Hever Castle in England. Right, Georgica Pond in East Hampton can be seen from more than one side of the great room. Durell Godfrey Photos
The family enjoys the tranquil waters of Georgica Pond from one side of the house.
Dining in the sunroom, with its sweeping views of moors, Georgica Pond, and Georgica Beach, contrasts with meals at the formal dining room table, below left, which seems to await a feast for royalty.
Right: Books and a quirky folk art bicycle rider fill the center of the great room.
At left: Carl Tiedemann collected tools to make full use of the space between the beams. Right: A whimsical ladder is by the artist and studio furniture maker Tommy Simpson.
Tudor-style paneling geometrically complements a mantelpiece and its eclectic assortment.

Look closely as you go around town and you will see there is tremendous variation among kousas
“Chinese” Wilson introduced the kousa dogwood into the United States from seed he collected in China in the early years of the 20th century. Abby Jane Brody

Celebrating its 30th year, the tour will include five private gardens of note
The garden of Rosalind and Ken Landis in Wainscott overlooks Georgica Pond. Durell Godfrey
The view of Georgica PondDurell Godfrey
The covered porchDurell Godfrey
The poolDurell Godfrey
A planter by the poolDurell Godfrey
The Hughes house in Bridgehampton overlooks Sagg Pond.Durell Godfrey
A patio covered with greeneryDurell Godfrey
The view to Sagg PondDurell Godfrey
The pool and its plantingsDurell Godfrey
Garden benchDurell Godfrey

This past winter appears to have been more difficult for hydrangeas than the winter of 2014
Those who expect a lot of blooms from their hydrangeas will likely be disappointed. Jennifer Landes
Abby Jane Brody

The original house has been a residence for 336 years
Cherished in a recent renovation, adze-hewn ceiling timbers in the living room reveal the house’s pre-Revolutionary origins. The painting is by Hilary Holmes.
The original saltbox, festooned in ivy (insert), remains visible despite additions, to the left, of an upstairs bedroom and a vaguely Victorian sunporch.
Uncurtained panes and a bay window added by an earlier owner lighten the living room — and one of the house’s wooden Stave jigsaw puzzles, in foreground at left and below.
Large and small saltboxes were added.
The master bedroom is kept tidy for guests’ tours. Below, a gargoyle among many in the yard and one of many joints.
A copper-topped counter connects the kitchen and breakfast room.
Windsor chairs and a Bernard Buffet painting grace the dining room.

The designers are all animal lovers who donated their time and expertise for the sixth annual showhouse event
John Stedila, above, and Tim Button teamed up to design a room. Durell Godfrey

A below-ground “ruin” is surrounded by a new meadow leading to three roundels.
The roundel: A tranquil respite after a sunny meadow. Erika Shank
Notice the ruin at the right in the photo above.
In the meadow Salvia Oxford Blue, in foreground, provides a painterly effect.
Aralia cordata Sun King and Lavender Phenomenal in Ruin Garden. Abby Jane Brody Photos  

A seven-foot-high, two-foot-thick wall built by hand
“If I ever sell this place, I’m going to advertise an outdoor shower,” Craig Bernhardt said of his property in Northwest, East Hampton. Durell Godfrey Photos
A medieval fortification? No. A carving marks the midpoint of the wall’s construction. A hidden showerhead is just around the bend. Durell Godfrey Photos
The teak table on the patio awaits the season’s first dinner party.
Creeping foliage adds a sense of mystery as one approaches the wall.
The shower water arrives in hidden pipes.
The kitchen’s got its own rock wall.
Craig Bernhardt provided a photo of his labor of love nearing completion.