Habitat

Finding collectibles was fun and serious at the same time
Bonnie Maslin, a clinical psychologist, relies on her sense of humor when she decides what to buy at yard sales and when she calls the collection the Museum of Low Taste.
The view of Gardiner’s Bay from Bonnie Maslin’s house in Springs, seen from the bathroom, offers respite from the intensity required to take in the countless ceramic figurines, lazy susans, and collectibles at the Museum of Low Taste, or MOLT. Even the bathroom is part of the museum.
The Museum of Low Taste contains commemorative ceramics, including some depicting President Kennedy and his family and Elvis Presley on a plate from an inn in Jerusalem.
Ceramic figurines and lazy susans are complemented by what Bonnie Maslin, the curator and tour guide, calls “church-lady handbags,” below.

A contemporary North Haven house departs from the norms
A sculpture of horses by Robert L. Hooke, an artist who lives in Sag Harbor, welcomes visitors to Susan Goldstein’s North Haven house. Her daughter is a professional equestrian. Durell Godfrey
A dramatic dining table was fashioned from two ancient cherry trees that were ready to fall. A glass wall of water creates soothing sounds and divides the living room into two seating areas.
The fixtures in a bathroom and its counter reflect distinctive taste. Custom-fabricated corner windows provide dramatic views while helping lower the cost of heating and cooling.Durell Godfrey photos
Projecting balconies and strong horizontal volumes bring Frank Lloyd Wright to mind. A dramatic, three-story rotunda is the axis of the house; the balcony leads to the bedrooms.Durell Godfrey photos
A fieldstone wall and tables using wood from the property’s cherry trees bring rusticity into the living room. The stair treads were also fabricated from the trees.Durell Godfey Photos

Did Anne Boleyn take shelter under these beams?
A birdhouse marks the view of the Tiedemanns’ house from the south.
Left, the “bones” of a 500-year-old barn come from the Boleyn family’s Hever Castle in England. Right, Georgica Pond in East Hampton can be seen from more than one side of the great room. Durell Godfrey Photos
The family enjoys the tranquil waters of Georgica Pond from one side of the house.
Dining in the sunroom, with its sweeping views of moors, Georgica Pond, and Georgica Beach, contrasts with meals at the formal dining room table, below left, which seems to await a feast for royalty.
Right: Books and a quirky folk art bicycle rider fill the center of the great room.
At left: Carl Tiedemann collected tools to make full use of the space between the beams. Right: A whimsical ladder is by the artist and studio furniture maker Tommy Simpson.
Tudor-style paneling geometrically complements a mantelpiece and its eclectic assortment.

The old dairy barn has history of its own
The plaque on the boulder, below, commemorates the Springs Fire Department’s first home — George Sid Miller Jr.’s dairy barn. An image of a Native American appears in one of its open doors. These assemblages of found objects testify to Thomas Whitehill’s particular alchemy.
Simple furniture cedes the limelight to collectibles on the living room walls.
The drip-painted bass, above, is among the complex objects and often witty constructions in the barn, below.
An old industrial fan, above, is embellished with Japanese fans, tassels, and what have you. Below, a fallen tree was decorated rather than carted away.
The artist Hedda Sterne built the house after making the barn her studio.
Mr. Whitehill is seen at right; he found one side of a fanlight window at the Sag Harbor dump.

It takes over a month to prepare my house
The table is set for last year’s Seder. The artichoke, orange, and banana on the second Seder plate are symbols of contemporary life, and a child’s death.
A craftsman opts for simplicity, using the minimum amount of materials
Santiago Campomar is still tinkering with his prototype mahogany deck chair, seen atop a Felder table saw in his Noyac workshop. Durell Godfrey
In a house on Shelter Island, above, a custom banquette, table, and chairs of knotty pine were inspired by the furniture of Donald Judd. Below, projects for a client in East Hampton involved a piece as functional as it is decorative, its high gloss achieved with four deep blue coats of paint carefully brushed. Anastassios Mentis
Durell Godfrey
Mr. Campomar built this locker closet for a private gym in a Bridgehampton house. Santiago Campomar

Dan Rizzie does much of the cooking in the new kitchen
Carrara marble counters, above, white subway tiles around large windows, and open shelves define the new kitchen. Below: Dark cabinets in the old kitchen made it feel even smaller. Durell Godfrey Photographs
Beans and lentils soak under a Randy Lerner artwork.
Dan Rizzie chose a versatile faucet for one of two sinks.
Mr. Rizzie traded a painting for the figure in the living room, found in a Sag Harbor antiques shop.
Susan Lazarus-Reimen, who like her husband is an artist, poses with him near his “Piccolo Fiore,” mixed media on paper.

A vicarious look at the new New York
Fifth Avenue tree beds are packed with Queen of the Night tulips.
Ornamental cabbages provide months of color and interest on Park Avenue.
Yellow and purple violas fill a built-in handrail at a townhouse.
Planted pots define a path through a plaza at the Flatiron Building.