Habitat

Finding collectibles was fun and serious at the same time
Bonnie Maslin, a clinical psychologist, relies on her sense of humor when she decides what to buy at yard sales and when she calls the collection the Museum of Low Taste.
The view of Gardiner’s Bay from Bonnie Maslin’s house in Springs, seen from the bathroom, offers respite from the intensity required to take in the countless ceramic figurines, lazy susans, and collectibles at the Museum of Low Taste, or MOLT. Even the bathroom is part of the museum.
The Museum of Low Taste contains commemorative ceramics, including some depicting President Kennedy and his family and Elvis Presley on a plate from an inn in Jerusalem.
Ceramic figurines and lazy susans are complemented by what Bonnie Maslin, the curator and tour guide, calls “church-lady handbags,” below.

A contemporary North Haven house departs from the norms
A sculpture of horses by Robert L. Hooke, an artist who lives in Sag Harbor, welcomes visitors to Susan Goldstein’s North Haven house. Her daughter is a professional equestrian. Durell Godfrey
A dramatic dining table was fashioned from two ancient cherry trees that were ready to fall. A glass wall of water creates soothing sounds and divides the living room into two seating areas.
The fixtures in a bathroom and its counter reflect distinctive taste. Custom-fabricated corner windows provide dramatic views while helping lower the cost of heating and cooling.Durell Godfrey photos
Projecting balconies and strong horizontal volumes bring Frank Lloyd Wright to mind. A dramatic, three-story rotunda is the axis of the house; the balcony leads to the bedrooms.Durell Godfrey photos
A fieldstone wall and tables using wood from the property’s cherry trees bring rusticity into the living room. The stair treads were also fabricated from the trees.Durell Godfey Photos

Did Anne Boleyn take shelter under these beams?
A birdhouse marks the view of the Tiedemanns’ house from the south.
Left, the “bones” of a 500-year-old barn come from the Boleyn family’s Hever Castle in England. Right, Georgica Pond in East Hampton can be seen from more than one side of the great room. Durell Godfrey Photos
The family enjoys the tranquil waters of Georgica Pond from one side of the house.
Dining in the sunroom, with its sweeping views of moors, Georgica Pond, and Georgica Beach, contrasts with meals at the formal dining room table, below left, which seems to await a feast for royalty.
Right: Books and a quirky folk art bicycle rider fill the center of the great room.
At left: Carl Tiedemann collected tools to make full use of the space between the beams. Right: A whimsical ladder is by the artist and studio furniture maker Tommy Simpson.
Tudor-style paneling geometrically complements a mantelpiece and its eclectic assortment.

Beth Eckhardt, in her eclectic Amagansett shop, finds working with blooms creative and joyful.
Rebecca Jens helps Anastasia Casale of Sag Harbor Florist, far left, get it all together.
Amagansett Flowers by Beth has vintage vases, pots, and finds from nature at the ready.
Flowers create a fine tableau.
An elegant vase completes the floral picture.
Anastasia Casale enjoys flowers all year long.

Joe Nahem’s Amagansett retreat is filled with personality — and artwork
A two-story stone fireplace divides the living room. The art is by Dirk Skreber, left wall, George Condo, fireplace, and Herman Bas, right wall. The coffee table, left foreground, is by George Nakashima. Vintage American armchairs covered in linen, below, are beneath a Massimo Vitali photograph in the master bedroom.
Vintage reed armchairs, a Moroccan wool rug, a bench by the French designer Alexandre Loge, French floor lamps, and a painting by Aya Takano, a Japanese manga artist, also enliven the living room, as does Josie, a Jack Russell terrier.
The kitchen has its own den, left, with a Shaker wood-burning stove, vintage Scandinavian rug, and Milo Baughman tub chairs. The black walnut counter in the cooking area, right, was made by Mira Nakashima.

Technology has made decorating more versatile
Matthew Charron
Patricia Sales
Durell Godfrey Photos

Before the doors opened at 10 a.m. Friday, the line already stretched down the street. Durell Godfrey
Bundles of Grey Gardens stationeryDurell Godfrey
Would-be buyers peered through the windows at Grey Gardens as they waited for the doors to open on Friday morning.Durell Godfrey
Some went with purpose, others were merely there to shop. At left, Dyanna Nesbit held a parrot figurine, purchased for a friend who believed it had belonged to the Beales.Durell Godfey
People were asked to wear blue booties as they traipsed through the house.Durell Godfrey
A flock of early birds waited for the clock to strike 10.Durell Godfrey
Browsing the offeringsDurell Godfrey
A sign on a bedroom doorDurell Godfrey
The documentary and a photo reel played on a TV in one of the rooms.Durell Godfrey
"There's quite a bit of wicker," Susan Wexler of Behind the Hedges said earlier this week. Durell Godfrey

Featuring five houses ranging in style from traditional to modern
An East Hampton Village house on the tour combines French interior accents with an exterior reminiscent of an English cottage. Landscape Details

Rapid construction, locked-in price
Punit Chugh and Anjali Gupta display a model of a premade wall. Below, this modernist Davinci Haus was custom designed. Durell Godfrey
Aman Developers’ new office will be in a Davinci Haus to the east of the traditional building that is its office now. State-of-the-art technology will reduce the carbon footprint. Bill Chaleff of Chaleff and Rogers
The Eden Mountain Estate in the Swiss Alps is a Davinci Haus.