Habitat

Finding collectibles was fun and serious at the same time
Bonnie Maslin, a clinical psychologist, relies on her sense of humor when she decides what to buy at yard sales and when she calls the collection the Museum of Low Taste.
The view of Gardiner’s Bay from Bonnie Maslin’s house in Springs, seen from the bathroom, offers respite from the intensity required to take in the countless ceramic figurines, lazy susans, and collectibles at the Museum of Low Taste, or MOLT. Even the bathroom is part of the museum.
The Museum of Low Taste contains commemorative ceramics, including some depicting President Kennedy and his family and Elvis Presley on a plate from an inn in Jerusalem.
Ceramic figurines and lazy susans are complemented by what Bonnie Maslin, the curator and tour guide, calls “church-lady handbags,” below.

A contemporary North Haven house departs from the norms
A sculpture of horses by Robert L. Hooke, an artist who lives in Sag Harbor, welcomes visitors to Susan Goldstein’s North Haven house. Her daughter is a professional equestrian. Durell Godfrey
A dramatic dining table was fashioned from two ancient cherry trees that were ready to fall. A glass wall of water creates soothing sounds and divides the living room into two seating areas.
The fixtures in a bathroom and its counter reflect distinctive taste. Custom-fabricated corner windows provide dramatic views while helping lower the cost of heating and cooling.Durell Godfrey photos
Projecting balconies and strong horizontal volumes bring Frank Lloyd Wright to mind. A dramatic, three-story rotunda is the axis of the house; the balcony leads to the bedrooms.Durell Godfrey photos
A fieldstone wall and tables using wood from the property’s cherry trees bring rusticity into the living room. The stair treads were also fabricated from the trees.Durell Godfey Photos

Did Anne Boleyn take shelter under these beams?
A birdhouse marks the view of the Tiedemanns’ house from the south.
Left, the “bones” of a 500-year-old barn come from the Boleyn family’s Hever Castle in England. Right, Georgica Pond in East Hampton can be seen from more than one side of the great room. Durell Godfrey Photos
The family enjoys the tranquil waters of Georgica Pond from one side of the house.
Dining in the sunroom, with its sweeping views of moors, Georgica Pond, and Georgica Beach, contrasts with meals at the formal dining room table, below left, which seems to await a feast for royalty.
Right: Books and a quirky folk art bicycle rider fill the center of the great room.
At left: Carl Tiedemann collected tools to make full use of the space between the beams. Right: A whimsical ladder is by the artist and studio furniture maker Tommy Simpson.
Tudor-style paneling geometrically complements a mantelpiece and its eclectic assortment.

A beach house dream realized in the ’50s
The house today is much the same as seen in these contemperaneous photos. David Allee Photos

Where an ugly duckling became a swan
The original 1970s Amagansett house was grandfathered in to become the Treehouse, circa 2015, allowing views from the third story. Matthew Carbone Photos
The living room of the Treehouse.
An indoor/outdoor bathroom experience.
The unobstructed view from the top.
A light-filled, architecturally pleasing staircase.
Andrew Catapano, the owner.

Mary Nimmo Moran's gardens here may have been inspired by American Impressionist paintings

Every May, the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons stages its own show house
Tamara Fraser wanted to create a serene environment for relaxing after a long day at the beach. To that end, she used mostly beige, gray, and taupe. Durell Godfrey
Iris Zonlight’s snug bedroom reflects her predilection for black and white. Jai, her former ARF dog, seems comfortable with her design choices. Durell Godfrey
Michael Murray and Tim Cronenberger put some final touches on the rooms in the barn for Rachel Ray Home.Durell Godfrey

By Cathie Ireys Gandel
Kyoto-style hibachi made of keyaki wood with a copper lining. Below, wood and bamboo utensils for the kitchen.
Left, a step tansu would be used for stairs and storage. Right, an elaborate merchant’s chest would impress customers.
A selection of blue-and-white dishes with traditional motifs
Black lacquer storage boxes are handmade.

The old dairy barn has history of its own
The plaque on the boulder, below, commemorates the Springs Fire Department’s first home — George Sid Miller Jr.’s dairy barn. An image of a Native American appears in one of its open doors. These assemblages of found objects testify to Thomas Whitehill’s particular alchemy.
Simple furniture cedes the limelight to collectibles on the living room walls.
The drip-painted bass, above, is among the complex objects and often witty constructions in the barn, below.
An old industrial fan, above, is embellished with Japanese fans, tassels, and what have you. Below, a fallen tree was decorated rather than carted away.
The artist Hedda Sterne built the house after making the barn her studio.
Mr. Whitehill is seen at right; he found one side of a fanlight window at the Sag Harbor dump.