Habitat

Purple works well on a small scale or in a large park-like setting

An eclectic house and garden have classic echoes
The roofline angles that lured Diane Blell, and the turret she added, overlook the all-green garden. Below, from left: An ormolu-framed mirror adds sparkle to a niche, and Planet the cat guards the entrance to the living room. Photos by Durell Godfrey
Dianne Blell shows a visitor a Horus-eyed chair and painted diamonds on the walls that evoke Picasso.
The culture of some of the countries she’s been to is evident.
Above, from left: A Keith Sonnier neon sculpture commands attention. The stairs, right, are original to the house; the railing came from Home Depot.
Chairs and decorative items await a photo shoot, with one of Ms. Blell’s artworks propped against the wall.
The studio is at the foot of the garden.
Left, one of her tableau photographs is hung over a Venetian desk. Center, the second floor of the turret is sometimes used as a sleeping porch. Right,the fireplace surround is antiqued mirror; the seat in front of it is from India.Photos by Durell Godfrey

The tour will take in five private gardens
Fred Stelle will open up his North Haven garden on Guild Hall’s Garden as Art tour Saturday. Durell Godfrey

Every Merrell House Tells A Story
The house offers long views toward the ocean from the second floor living areas and the third floor office and roof deck. Below, James Merrell pauses during a recent visit. Durell Godfrey Photos
Crepe myrtles flank a 20-step staircase made of dry-stack granite blocks.
A steep staircase leads to the ground floor. Right, recliners face the ocean in the master suite.
Rolling mahogany shutters help modulate sunlight at the rear of the house.
The family room, adjoining the kitchen, looks out over wetlands.
A fire pit can be lighted for outdoor comfort on chilly nights.
In the kitchen, gold-leaf glass tiles reflect sunlight throughout the day.
Durell Godfrey Photos

Five Years in the Making, the Gardens and Buildings Have Distinctive Personality
The main house, with cues from Japanese architecture and Frank Lloyd Wright, is large but nestled into the landscape. It faces part of the water garden. Photographs by Durell Godfrey
A house original to the property is now a comfortable guesthouse.
A new barn, with a fireplace and screening room, is perfect for parties.
This screened-in porch is Monica Graham’s favorite room. She also loves the kilim-covered cubes.
The gym, above, has equipment of every possible kind. It can be seen from the indoor pool, below, which boasts two underwater treadmills.
A corner of Ms. Graham’s bathroom.
Clerestory windows, horizontal stone-work, and light fixtures reflect Frank Lloyd Wright, and custom-made patio umbrellas replicate some of the house’s roof lines.
A freestanding, wood spindle-work screen, left, separates the living and dining rooms. Right, an antique Chinese gong makes a statement in the hall even when not struck.
Folding doors have custom-painted panels with an Asian motif and open onto the office. Photographs by Durell Godfrey

Inspired by the Giants of 20th Century Architecture
The south side of Don Lenzer and Bettina Volz’s house in Amagansett lets in the light, below. Above, the north side shows few windows but classic modernism.
The open floor plan, above, allows graceful flow with ample glass and pleasing sight lines, while radiant heat provides comfort. Below, a whimsical rocking horse enlivens the mud room, and Jules, the family cat, graces the living area, where a Design Within Reach sofa is paired with an Ikea chair.
Above, from left, the cantilevered bedroom is fit for dreaming, the accompanying bathroom has a half-eggshell tub, and Don Lenzer’s office, below, where a sleeper sofa sports bold pillows and the Ikea bookshelves are full to bursting.

Defined by Reclaimed Pine and Vibrant Fabrics
Climbing roses almost conceal the main house, left, and the guesthouse. Photographs by Durell Godfrey
The great room in the former house, seen from the hall, was retained. Below, the great room’s large windows look out at a grove of shade trees.
A massive breakfront, like other pieces in the house, consists of repurposed sections of different furniture.
Wooden doors above the fireplace in the sitting room off the entry hall conceal a television.
A comfortable guest bedroom has its own sitting area.
A view of the master bedroom, which is in the new part of the house, reflects a love of fabrics.
Touches of blue brighten the kitchen, paneling conceals the refrigerator and freezer, and a hidden folding door can close the kitchen off from the dining room.Photographs by Durell Godfrey

A large floral pillow provides Catherine Constance Cooper with cozy comfort in her grandmother’s house. Photos by Durell Godfrey
Hurricane lamps and flowers enhance the dining room.
Shabby-chic is epitomized in the sun room.
A postcard of French bathing beauties is among antiques on a mantel.
An old high chair sits in the corner of the parlor.
The sun room was a 20th century addition.
Valerie Smith takes a break from the Monogram Shop with Dixie, her golden retriever.

Creativity Runs in the Family
The cast concrete legs of Nico Yektai’s massive Bench #8 have intricate detailing. Gestural wood components make the bench, which is designed for the outdoors, unique.
The Pontus table is a functional sculpture.
The artist-craftsman’s hands are seen in motion as he shapes a piece of wood.
The Shore dining table has an undulating edge, defining where each person sits. Stainless-steel legs transfer the sculptural effect to a concrete base.
The Waves bench has curved, tapered, and angled cast concrete legs. The seat is bleached maple.
Custom wall-hung consoles blend art and utility. This console has drawers that open in unexpected ways.

Design, ecological, and economic benefits
Mats of low-growing sedum are wrapped in netting and transferred from pallets for installation. Arthur Beckenstein
The sedum is grown in “engineered” soil, and it requires little weeding.